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Google Announces Android 4.3, Update Rolling Out Today

Tags:
  • Software
  • Android
  • Google
  • Tablets
  • Smartphones
Last response: in News comments
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July 24, 2013 1:29:06 PM

Don't you dare pull a xbone on me, google.
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2
July 24, 2013 1:29:07 PM

Double post. (Ignore please, it's not my fault)
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July 24, 2013 1:49:33 PM

Well, I know my phone (HTC One S) won't be getting updated...
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3
July 24, 2013 2:18:31 PM

Mike Friesen said:
Double post. (Ignore please, it's not my fault)


Um, no. all they did is make it EASIER for devs to include DRM IF they choose to do so. if anything, this will see devs who were unwilling to get on the android boat (donno anyone...) hop on. Also, it'll make a big difference for Indie developers if they want to have DRM for whatever reason. DRM isn't all evil, and to many small-time devs it can be critical to their success. it's all about implementation. MS screwed it up with XB1, but in this case all google is offering is choice for devs
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July 24, 2013 3:39:04 PM

I just bought an ACER ICONIA a700. Does anybody know if any device can take this upgrade? Or can only certain devices?
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July 24, 2013 5:37:34 PM

otacon72 said:
Good luck waiting months to get it...if at all.


You still don't get it, even if it's been explained to everybody plenty of times.
Google is only directly responsible for their own Nexus line, and their devices are getting the upgrade already.
The other manufacturers are responsible for their own Android-BASED devices (in bold letters, so thick people can get it).
Got it?
Since you don't even comprehend the difference between a Nexus device and an Android-based phone, it would be futile to try to explain to you the difference between a closed OS and an open OS (one that is made available for free to other manufacturers to use as a BASE for their own OS).
IF iOS were an open OS, and assuming that other manufacturers would bother to use that as a template to make some other iOS-based phones, it would be their direct responsibility to update their own phones when a new version comes out.

Anyhow, my luck seems to be good, indeed, since my Nexus 10 is getting the update. Chew on that for a while, buddy.
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July 24, 2013 6:48:27 PM

come on Google let us Nexus S owners have one more update :) 
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3
July 24, 2013 7:55:45 PM

@house70 - While I get your point, that's like saying that that if you wanted the latest Windows updates, you should buy a Surface...but too bad, you bought an Asus..or a homebuilt so you don't get it. Yes, technically those other devices are Android based instead of running a vanilla build, but they are close enough to run nearly every app, so they should be built in such a way as to allow the kernal upgrade (that's OOP fundamentals...)
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July 25, 2013 12:59:04 AM

vmem said:
Um, no. all they did is make it EASIER for devs to include DRM IF they choose to do so. if anything, this will see devs who were unwilling to get on the android boat (donno anyone...) hop on. Also, it'll make a big difference for Indie developers if they want to have DRM for whatever reason. DRM isn't all evil, and to many small-time devs it can be critical to their success. it's all about implementation. MS screwed it up with XB1, but in this case all google is offering is choice for devs


Microsoft was basically just putting their own version of Steam on the Xbox. With some fancier stuff that Steam does not yet have. They were just bad at explaining that. And I guess consol rage nin general.
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July 25, 2013 4:20:48 AM

inanition02 said:
@house70 - While I get your point, that's like saying that that if you wanted the latest Windows updates, you should buy a Surface...but too bad, you bought an Asus..or a homebuilt so you don't get it. Yes, technically those other devices are Android based instead of running a vanilla build, but they are close enough to run nearly every app, so they should be built in such a way as to allow the kernal upgrade (that's OOP fundamentals...)

Not quite. The difference is, Windows (or any other closed OS) is provided by MS and the OEM can not modify it's code in any way, the customer gets support directly from MS for the OS and he/she paid a pretty penny for it when bought the system. Android's base code is widely available online for free as AOSP for every OEM to use and modify/abuse any way they feel without any obligation towards Google (even the Google certification only means the device is compatible with G Play services, not that Google is responsible for the device); Google does not see a dime from the OEMs, and the OEMs have the AOSP framework and codebase at their disposal to modify as they wish. As a result, OEMs implement all kind of skinned solutions, proprietary code that often doesn't even see the light of day under open source rules (because it's not open) and Google can not know what it contains, let alone be responsible for it.
All Google can do (and it already does) is release latest AOSP sources for everyone (including manufacturers) to use. By adding closed-sourced code to this, OEMs effectively turn into an Apple-like entity, controlling every aspect of the updating/servicing, etc. for their devices. Some are more successful than others.
To use an analogy, Google provides the dough, but the OEM is responsible for the final pizza that they make. Windows provides the dough and the toppings, along with the instructions of how to make the pizza. Apple just makes the whole pizza without allowing anyone to use/license same ingredients and recipe.
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July 25, 2013 6:43:18 AM

otacon72 said:
Good luck waiting months to get it...if at all.


inanition02 said:
@house70 - While I get your point, that's like saying that that if you wanted the latest Windows updates, you should buy a Surface...but too bad, you bought an Asus..or a homebuilt so you don't get it. Yes, technically those other devices are Android based instead of running a vanilla build, but they are close enough to run nearly every app, so they should be built in such a way as to allow the kernal upgrade (that's OOP fundamentals...)


You can already get it, the git repo was updated yesterday, you can build it yourself. If you want it on YOUR device complain to YOUR device manufacturer. the problem isn't the kernel it's the drivers and customizations. No PC manufacturer screws with the Windows core components because they don't have access to the source code. Take a look at Samsung and Amazon, they run Android but heavily modified versions. Add to that all the locking that the phone companies do. To support all of these devices Google would need to withhold the source or build in all of the modifications, neither works. It's up to the companies that build the devices to update them, or they can stick with the vanilla Android and they can update almost immediately, almost like what Motorola has being doing lately.

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July 25, 2013 8:11:47 AM

Adrianime said:
I just bought an ACER ICONIA a700. Does anybody know if any device can take this upgrade? Or can only certain devices?


Google's nexus devices are direct through google. They always get the latest software first, because the software was developed for them.

You'll have to wait for acer to port the new update to their device and get it through them. Also you can check with XDA developers to see if any hackers out their can root and create a rom for your device with the new software.
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July 25, 2013 9:36:40 AM

@house70
Oh, we get it alright. But we're saying it's a problem. Certainly, the open model has its advantages, but it's not free of disadvantages. Fragmentation is one of those disadvantages in this case. It may not be Google's "responsibility" to update these phones, but I'm sure they don't mind including all the "Android-BASED" phones in their activation numbers they quote. I bet they also don't mind getting all the ad and app revenue either. Google could provide stronger incentives to OEMs to update their phones. For example, they could cut off older versions from accessing the play store or from accessing Google apps. If you're an OEM like Amazon, you have your own store, so you can do what you want. But for those that are accessing the Google stuff, Google could assert more control. It's a little convenient for them to happily take all the ad and app revenue and then just throw up their hands when the OEMs don't push out updates.
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July 25, 2013 10:21:03 AM

So here you go this is the first aosp released of this code already available for non nexus users.
http://www.xda-developers.com/android/first-aosp-4-3-bu...

this is how early this was rooted
http://www.xda-developers.com/android/android-4-3-leake...

If you want to be able to do these things learn this
http://www.xda-developers.com/android/adb-and-fastboot-...

fragmentation is going away month by month. the new IDE is helping devs
http://developer.android.com/sdk/installing/studio.html

and many problems that were difficult in the past are now more routine and this understanding of the android environment by devs will always keep improving.
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July 26, 2013 12:09:03 PM

Well, looks like my Asus Transformer Pad is getting an update! On the other hand My LG Spirit Android phone will not! LG has the worst support I've ever seen even tho they make a darn good phone....
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