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Seagate Laptop Ultrathin HDD Review: 500 GB In 5 mm Of Space

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July 31, 2013 9:29:22 PM

makes ya wonder how small this format can go. impressive.
July 31, 2013 9:34:46 PM

For the hard drive being benchmarked, is it possible for tomshardware to color the text to make them easier to find in the list?

for example http://i.imgur.com/VXwTs6y.jpg

it only takes about 3 seconds to do (even faster if you are in the process of making the chart and not changing colors in post)
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a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
July 31, 2013 10:07:09 PM

Quote:
Its main selling point is the fact that it's only 5 mm thick, instead of the 9.5"

Think you meant 9.5mm there.

At least it's not got proprietary connectors like the WD 5mm ones do. Think you need to add one of those to the benchmarks though - it's Seagate's biggest competition.
July 31, 2013 11:04:36 PM

This would be a good choice for a mITX build when you want budget storage to complement a SSD.
a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
July 31, 2013 11:28:05 PM

Not really; it'll cost significantly more per GB than a 9.5mm drive, but all the bays are fine with the thicker drives.
July 31, 2013 11:54:11 PM

Someone Somewhere said:
Not really; it'll cost significantly more per GB than a 9.5mm drive, but all the bays are fine with the thicker drives.


Regular thickness drives are $60-80 and this one is mentioned to be under $100 with no price given for the consumer market. I wouldn't mind paying a small premium for a drive that utilizes 53% of the area of a 9.5mm drive.
a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
August 1, 2013 1:07:14 AM

The thing is there's nothing you can do with the extra space; it's a couple of millimeters in the middle of an HDD cage
August 1, 2013 1:11:30 AM

No point in 5 mm HDD, any laptop can install regular 9 mm HDD
More expensive, more slower
a b G Storage
August 1, 2013 1:12:11 AM

Please Tom's, get rid of the new format for pictures having the caption as an alpha-blended banner overlapping the bottom of the picture. This article's second picture, which attempts to illustrate the thinness of the new drive, is ruined by the new captioning method. Use some intelligence and put the caption UNDER the picture. This is the way that has worked for decades in both print and online. Why change something that works for a system that fails?
a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
August 1, 2013 1:14:19 AM

XngXtuHl said:
No point in 5 mm HDD, any laptop can install regular 9 mm HDD
More expensive, more slower


Nope, ultrabooks often have 7mm slots or none, and soon I'd expect that to be 5mm.
August 1, 2013 3:39:37 AM

XngXtuHl, this HD is really about fitting in the 'ultra-book' form factor.
August 1, 2013 6:16:20 AM

Someone Somewhere said:
The thing is there's nothing you can do with the extra space; it's a couple of millimeters in the middle of an HDD cage


Who said anything about a HDD cage?
August 1, 2013 8:01:25 AM

There is one interesting use that I can think of. A new laptop, in place of the DVD drive, you can have 2 slots for ultra thin hard drives in addition to a standard SSD.

Allowing for a lot of extra storage, or RAID 1 bulk storage since it is common place for laptops to use SSD's now but it is also well known that you should always backup your important data and keep bulk data off of the SSD. (SSD= OS and applications only)
August 1, 2013 8:19:47 AM

@someone somewhere

Remember the old wash tub disk drive disk packs? Even they were only like 6" tall tho'. :) 
August 1, 2013 9:06:06 AM

Why not go with SSD? stop using these mechanical drives already, when I shop for monitor I can't find crt anymore, lets make it the same.
August 1, 2013 9:34:30 AM

jaber2 said, "Why not go with SSD? stop using these mechanical drives already, when I shop for monitor I can't find crt anymore, lets make it the same."

You can get an answer to your question in an article on this subject - the article on this page (if you read it)
August 1, 2013 10:17:22 AM

This technology should be used with iPod classics! They're so unpopular because the only ones who buy one are people with alot of music and videos, and the highest capacity they offer is 160Gb. That's not very much for movie files, especially HD/ Bluray ones. Apple might be better off adopting technology like this!
a b D Laptop
a b G Storage
August 1, 2013 10:55:42 AM

I'd have to wonder about the durability of a drive like this, especially in a tablet or other thin form factor that might flex, even a little.
August 1, 2013 12:29:43 PM

Leamon said:
This technology should be used with iPod classics! They're so unpopular because the only ones who buy one are people with alot of music and videos, and the highest capacity they offer is 160Gb. That's not very much for movie files, especially HD/ Bluray ones. Apple might be better off adopting technology like this!

The current hard drive based ipods use 1.8" 1 platter drives, not sure of the thickness, 7mm?
so they'd have to have a larger chassis in length/width but not as much thickness.
With current platter densities, Apple could put in a 250GB 1.8" 1 platter drive in their ipods
August 2, 2013 5:59:45 AM

Reliability?
I'm more interested in reliability than speed.
One would suspect 1 platter to be more reliable than 2, 3, or 4 platters.
The article doesn't mention how many heads, 1 or 2.
Again, I suspect 1 head more reliable than 2 heads.
Unfortunately, Tomshardware can't test 5 year reliability, but there might be data somewhere on improved reliability of 1 platter and of 1 head.
a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
August 2, 2013 6:03:16 AM

Not really. Most trouble is due to read failures rather than mechanical failures. In fact, I think lower densities are more reliable due to higher SNRs.
August 2, 2013 8:28:12 AM

Mother of Gosh. Wow, that is tiny!
a b G Storage
August 2, 2013 7:26:13 PM

HGST has a 7mm thick 7200RPM 500GB drive. One came in my Thinkpad over a year ago.
a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
August 2, 2013 8:52:10 PM

Not a 5mm though.
August 2, 2013 11:42:21 PM

the size of the drive is fine and dandy and all, but I don't see much of a benefit especially since the devices I use can't utilize the extra space.
a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
August 3, 2013 5:51:18 PM

For new laptops, where they can fill the extra space.
a b D Laptop
a b G Storage
August 7, 2013 12:28:17 PM

I want to see these hard drives being brought to cell phones. Wouldn't that be great if you could store your entire music collection on your phone?
a b D Laptop
a b G Storage
August 7, 2013 1:31:01 PM

Well, you can already get 32GB microSD cards; those will hold a LOT of music.
a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
August 7, 2013 7:53:40 PM

64GB ones aren't hard to find either.

Data density in flash is quite a bit higher than in HDDs, too. Think how many µSDs you'd need to take up that much space...
August 12, 2013 10:20:07 AM

The date when SSD takes over HDD has just been pushed by a decade into the future!
a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
August 12, 2013 10:01:54 PM

Yeah... no.

I reckon in a couple of years the only thing HDDs are going to be around for is long term bulk storage in datacentres. Everything else will be SSDs.

Seen how fast prices are dropping? And the only reason for these over mSATA/NVM is price?
August 20, 2013 7:42:44 PM

Who is going to buy this? The only advantage of creating something like this is if your creating a new form factor. No system builder will use this because the size is basicly proprietary, and no consumer will buy this because if your upgrading a HD who cares if its 9mm or 5mm. I don't see a market.
a b D Laptop
a c 76 G Storage
August 20, 2013 8:06:01 PM

Oh, they will. The thin wars continue...

Why wouldn't manufacturers use proprietary standards?
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