Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Samsung Mass Producing 3D Vertical NAND Flash

Last response: in News comments
Share
a b } Memory
August 6, 2013 6:37:57 AM

Now this is exciting news! Back in the '90s when die shrinks were becoming a popular way to bring performance improvements everyone was talking about how there is a limit to how small you can really go (back at the time they thought the limit was ~20nm or so). But the thought was that after the end of the die shrinks then we would either have to make changes by building 3D structures, layered structures, or maybe abandon the way we view tech and move to 'something else'. I was a kid at the time, and so now as an adult I have a strange fascination about this time we are entering where there is less and less importance to die shrinks anymore.

I think that for storage this is going to be a huge thing, especially for portable storage so that we can hopefully start getting 240GB+ of storage on phones and 1TB+ on tablets. But CPUs and GPUs are going to have some serious challenges moving to this kind of tech. Not only are the structures a whole lot more complicated, but they also produce a bunch of heat. I think that Intel was really hoping that things like Knight's Corner and the 'many core' designs would take off because each individual core would be much simpler, give off much less heat, and workloads could be distributed in a way so that once a core got warm then the load could move to a different core so that the entire unit would stay relatively cool. If they could accomplish that then each core could fit perpendicular to a back-plane, making for an insanely dense processing solution. But the fact of the matter is that normal workloads only take 1-2 cores and rarely up to 4, so this many core design does not work for most end users. To have a truly 3D CPU or GPU on current technology would just put out way too much heat to be practical yet, but I am sure they will think of something before too long. I mean, they really have to.
Score
7
August 6, 2013 6:50:11 AM

Intel 3d tech now in storage. Surprised that Intel didn't do this first for their ssd. They've sold the tech since ivy
Score
-6
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
August 6, 2013 6:52:38 AM

Great achievement to everyone involved.
Score
9
August 6, 2013 12:08:14 PM

A big round of applause. I'm getting sick of all developers giving ALL attention to the freaking software and none at all to hardware... I'm a hardware guy. I create tech designs as a hobby. Now i'm proud of Samsung, and i'm also proud of owning a Galaxy Note 2 5.5" smartphone. GO SAMSUNG, GO!!!
Score
1
August 6, 2013 2:46:00 PM

Prepare for 10Tb SSDs - this is real innovation, NOT rounded corners - in light of recent events if I were Samsung I would keep this tech and not license it and if Apple come knocking to buy some tell them to go fu@k themselves.
Score
2
August 6, 2013 3:13:00 PM

I think Samsung is winning my respect back after they used Pentile screens.
Score
0
August 6, 2013 4:06:50 PM

You've just got to love REAL progress! Seems like SSDs could displace HDDs in a not too distant future.
I hope they haven't been cuting any corners, though it's unlikely they'll be getting any patents on rounded corners, ha.
I'm on vaccation, typing this on à borrowed "touch" pad. I miss My keyboard!!!
Score
0
August 7, 2013 7:35:24 AM

CaedenV said:
Now this is exciting news! Back in the '90s when die shrinks were becoming a popular way to bring performance improvements everyone was talking about how there is a limit to how small you can really go (back at the time they thought the limit was ~20nm or so). But the thought was that after the end of the die shrinks then we would either have to make changes by building 3D structures, layered structures, or maybe abandon the way we view tech and move to 'something else'. I was a kid at the time, and so now as an adult I have a strange fascination about this time we are entering where there is less and less importance to die shrinks anymore.

I think that for storage this is going to be a huge thing, especially for portable storage so that we can hopefully start getting 240GB+ of storage on phones and 1TB+ on tablets. But CPUs and GPUs are going to have some serious challenges moving to this kind of tech. Not only are the structures a whole lot more complicated, but they also produce a bunch of heat. I think that Intel was really hoping that things like Knight's Corner and the 'many core' designs would take off because each individual core would be much simpler, give off much less heat, and workloads could be distributed in a way so that once a core got warm then the load could move to a different core so that the entire unit would stay relatively cool. If they could accomplish that then each core could fit perpendicular to a back-plane, making for an insanely dense processing solution. But the fact of the matter is that normal workloads only take 1-2 cores and rarely up to 4, so this many core design does not work for most end users. To have a truly 3D CPU or GPU on current technology would just put out way too much heat to be practical yet, but I am sure they will think of something before too long. I mean, they really have to.


back_by_demand said:
Prepare for 10Tb SSDs - this is real innovation, NOT rounded corners - in light of recent events if I were Samsung I would keep this tech and not license it and if Apple come knocking to buy some tell them to go fu@k themselves.


brute force is going to die at some point, thats what single core applications are basicly, they require a faster cpu to run faster no matter how many cores there are.

amd has a solution, and is in every new console, along with the pc, multi core, and multithreaded is going to work its way into the games second, first was pro programs, and it may trickel down to consumer programs.

i can honestly see a day when there is one power house cpu (something that can run single core applications really really fast) and the rest of the cpu is made up of smaller cores that work together to distribute the load. the fast single will require the heat sync, but the small distributed may be possibly to cool passively while working faster than what we have now.

but a new cooling solution would probably be the best way to go.

graphene to my knowledge can handle the 50-200ghz speed on air cooling

just imagine that at 3-5ghz, but with 40-120 cores stacked 3d.

and it may not be initially, but the 3d process will fall under frand., not giving samsung the ability to tell apple to eff off.
Score
0
August 7, 2013 6:20:44 PM

Brute force AND multi parallel will all eventually taper off in favor of efficiency, but the future is bright. Brute force for Processors have mostly been saturated, forcing cool innovation.

And why you mention Samsung and Apple? 3D tech is being developed and tested in super wide areas by many companies. Also, 3D can mean stacking, but not in the near future. Think more along the lines of Ivy/Haswell 3D transistors. Yes, high density parallel stuff will happen anyways, but not how you imagine it.
Score
1
August 14, 2013 1:19:52 PM

>SiN
Am I the only one who had a nostalgia-induced chuckle when I saw that?
Score
0
September 9, 2013 4:03:12 PM

Hopefully we can see this in the Galaxy S V
Score
0
!