Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Where can I get parts cheaper? or how?

Last response: in General UK & Ireland Discussions
Share
September 30, 2013 2:19:30 AM

I've been thinking about what parts to put together to build a computer recently and I've picked everything up to the case and PSU .
But that's not the question, the question is.
http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/p/1Jc2q
How can I build this rig cheaper? As it is it costs around £1000 pounds but if I were to stay in America IT would cost only 70% of the price. Its $1000 which in GBP at current rates is around £670.
Really what I wanna know is.
Am I doing it wrong?
It is quite a large gap even with the UKs steep taxes.

More about : parts cheaper

a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
September 30, 2013 2:23:14 AM

Well, you could definitely put together a similarly powerful rig for less money, but to address the main body of the question: America gets extremely favorable prices on technology for a number of reasons, and in general have the lowest overall price to build a computer with almost any parts configuration. On the plus side, Britain isn't even close to some of the worst countries in terms of mark-ups. The prices in places like South Africa are horrifying.
September 30, 2013 2:30:25 AM

Which parts do you recommend changing to make it a cheaper system? I was definitely going to clock the CPU to around 4.5Ghz.
I thought there might be a way round the costs like shipping the components from America or somewhere in Europe?
Related resources
a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
September 30, 2013 2:45:17 AM

PerryMcG said:
Which parts do you recommend changing to make it a cheaper system? I was definitely going to clock the CPU to around 4.5Ghz.
I thought there might be a way round the costs like shipping the components from America or somewhere in Europe?


Well, you'd actually need to increase your cost to overclock. You lack a -k CPU, which is designed for overclocking. However, I would actually recommend waiting a few days until the R-200 series of AMD GPUs hits the market. The R9-280X will likely be a good alternative to the 770 (it is to the 7970 what the 770 was to the 680), as it is slated to cost significantly less for roughly equal performance. Beyond that, you could use a cheaper SSD such as the Samsung 840 EVO instead of the Pro, and, if you're willing to lose a bit of performance to decrease costs, you could remove overclocking from the equation.
September 30, 2013 2:58:42 AM

I thought it was the K I had selected thank god you said that. :p  Could have ended up with the wrong CPU. I was originally gonna go for the older haswell CPU the i5 3570k i heard it had better clock rates when overclocked sufficiently. Then I'd need a different MoBo and I'm not sure if that is more expensive and or less. If it is less I would probably change out as if I'm upgrading again next year or whenever my new system cant handle new games ill be changing everything up
a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
September 30, 2013 3:02:52 AM

PerryMcG said:
I thought it was the K I had selected thank god you said that. :p  Could have ended up with the wrong CPU. I was originally gonna go for the older haswell CPU the i5 3570k i heard it had better clock rates when overclocked sufficiently. Then I'd need a different MoBo and I'm not sure if that is more expensive and or less. If it is less I would probably change out as if I'm upgrading again next year or whenever my new system cant handle new games ill be changing everything up


I'd actually recommend the Ivy Bridge i5-3570k for overclocking-oriented work. It tends to be about 5-10% cheaper than the Haswell 4670k, and the Z77 motherboards with which it is compatible are usually cheaper than the newer Z87s.
With a 770/R9-280X, I doubt that you'd need to upgrade within a year. It would depend on your resolution and whether you're at all willing to compromise on graphics, however.
September 30, 2013 3:13:43 AM

Ye sorry I meant Ivy Bridge this is a first time build from me so the amount of info ive been taking in over the last few days my heads about to explode and im getting mixed up :p 
I seen a few guys with the 3570k clocked to like 4.8-5.0Ghz. im sure that would be powerful enough to get me to next december?
a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
September 30, 2013 3:25:49 AM

PerryMcG said:
Ye sorry I meant Ivy Bridge this is a first time build from me so the amount of info ive been taking in over the last few days my heads about to explode and im getting mixed up :p 
I seen a few guys with the 3570k clocked to like 4.8-5.0Ghz. im sure that would be powerful enough to get me to next december?


No worries, we all get mixed up from time to time. I recall that when I first got into building systems, the four-number GPU designations from AMD and the three-number designations from nVIDIA left me hopelessly confused.
Well, going from my personal experience, my modestly overclocked (4.2GHz) 3770k, which for gaming purposes is functionally a 3570k, hasn't held me back at all, nor do I expect it to do so in the near future. That said, I plan to upgrade to Haswell-E next year, so my lifespan requirements may be lower than yours. However, given that Haswell is only slightly better than Ivy (and the gains are less than what you lose in overclocking), a 3570k is about the best option unless you want an Ivy Bridge-E processor, which would be heavy duty overkill and definitely not worth the cost.
September 30, 2013 3:41:39 AM

I don't know if my post actually posted there. But I don't know anything about motherboards do you have any recommendations? I would like to get the cost down i did really overshoot my £800 budget :p 

Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
September 30, 2013 4:48:55 AM
Share

PerryMcG said:
I don't know if my post actually posted there. But I don't know anything about motherboards do you have any recommendations? I would like to get the cost down i did really overshoot my £800 budget :p 


I love the ASRock Extreme6. Lovely board, usually very reasonably-priced, from a strong brand.

Well, if you're looking for a more wallet-friendly option, how about this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£167.99 @ Aria PC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler (£23.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme6 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£114.17 @ Ebuyer)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory (£52.99 @ Amazon UK)
Storage: Sandisk Ultra Plus 64GB 2.5" Solid State Disk (£47.95 @ CCL Computers)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£47.84 @ CCL Computers)
Case: Xigmatek Asgard II Black ATX Mid Tower Case (£30.51 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£48.96 @ CCL Computers)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHDS118-04 DVD/CD Drive (£11.10 @ Scan.co.uk)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) (£67.69 @ Aria PC)
Total: £613.18
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-09-30 12:47 BST+0100)

The R9-280X looks to be launching somewhere around 200 pounds (though I can't say for certain, I've been tracking the American prices), so it should fit in nicely.
September 30, 2013 1:42:00 PM

ye that looks great as far as I can see do you think the cooler will handle overclocking the CPU?
I would pay the extra for a better graphics card like the gtx 770 i chose in the previous build and i was gonna SLI another in later and that would hopefullly get me to christmas next year where id be thinking about updating my system
a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
September 30, 2013 2:25:28 PM

PerryMcG said:
ye that looks great as far as I can see do you think the cooler will handle overclocking the CPU?
I would pay the extra for a better graphics card like the gtx 770 i chose in the previous build and i was gonna SLI another in later and that would hopefullly get me to christmas next year where id be thinking about updating my system


The 212 Evo won't get you to 5GHz, but it's fine for moderate OCs. In your shoes, I would direct funds into graphics at least to the 2x7970/770/R9-280X or 1xR9-290X level before worrying too much about CPU overclocking. A stronger GPU is definitely more worthwhile. Should you want a stronger cooler, the Noctua NH-D14 is an exceptional choice.
According to current information on the R-200 series, the R9-280X should fall about level with the 770 for less, and the R9-290X will be drastically more powerful (around the level of the GTX Titan) for $100-200 more. It's up to you as to what GPU you put in your system, but I don't consider the 770 to be a strong contender even with the 7970s after AMD's price drops, much less the new series. Other opinions do exist on the matter, however.
October 3, 2013 11:36:14 AM

So u think my graphics card would bottleneck my system before the 3570K? I heard people saying the radeon cards have problems though but its probably BS, I really like nvidia because im familiar with them but if these new GFX cards are better for the price then i wont say no to em :p 
October 3, 2013 11:36:16 AM

So u think my graphics card would bottleneck my system before the 3570K? I heard people saying the radeon cards have problems though but its probably BS, I really like nvidia because im familiar with them but if these new GFX cards are better for the price then i wont say no to em :p 
a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
October 3, 2013 1:31:22 PM

PerryMcG said:
So u think my graphics card would bottleneck my system before the 3570K? I heard people saying the radeon cards have problems though but its probably BS, I really like nvidia because im familiar with them but if these new GFX cards are better for the price then i wont say no to em :p 


Any i5 should avoid a bottleneck, as should the FX8000 AMD CPUs (though the i5s have superior gaming performance). The 3570k is merely the best (in my mind) overclockable gaming CPU.
AMD cards have been known to have issues (or, more accurately, AMD drivers have been known to have issues), but they're rarely large enough to play a large role in decision-making. The biggest problem previously was that CrossFire was really broken, but that's been largely resolved, so I don't see any reason to avoid AMD.
Well, the R9-280X is expected on the 8th, so we'll be able to determine exactly how good the price-to-power on it is in just a few days.
October 3, 2013 1:47:07 PM

oh that soon :p  ye thats the problems i had read about. but really id change to them if they sorted that out im definarely thinking about doing either SLI or crossfire
!