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Internet Explorer 11 is Officially Available for Windows 7

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November 7, 2013 4:11:35 PM

Great another IE for me to uninstall.
Score
-6
November 7, 2013 4:21:48 PM

Guess I'm one of the few that use IE, with plugins and never have issues.. Always has been fast enough for me. Specially with quad cores now the normal.
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11
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November 7, 2013 4:23:18 PM

Yet another form of IE to download chrome with.
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-1
November 7, 2013 4:29:23 PM

IE 11: "Which browser would you like to download? (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)"
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-3
November 7, 2013 4:40:39 PM

OMG I am sick of this anti IE sluts.
Why do You post here if You don't care about IE??
I only use IE and now IE11 really kick A**!!
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6
November 7, 2013 5:00:07 PM

tanjali said:
OMG I am sick of this anti IE sluts.
Why do You post here if You don't care about IE??
I only use IE and now IE11 really kick A**!!


Cool story bro!
Score
-6
November 7, 2013 5:29:19 PM

I certainly wouldn't praise the likes of Safari, Chrome, Firefox or any other browser as being problem free. Each browser has it's issues, but at least with Internet Explorer, we get a sizeable window of time in which we know what to expect from reasonably polished software. Firefox seems to break something with every other release, and need constant, major version changes, while Chrome is going to toss features because Google feels like it. Apple's browser doesn't even ping my radar. I like and use IE on a regular basis and only when it fails to do something correctly do I need to turn to other browsers.
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5
November 7, 2013 5:31:01 PM

bochica said:
IE 11: "Which browser would you like to download? (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)"


IE11 is actually a very good browser. Its fast and it links in with MSE so it works out to be very secure.

Add in the TPL lists that can be used to block adds without having to have an add-on and its not a bad browser.

Firefox was a great browser but overall its not as good as it use to be.

Chrome tracks the crap out of you and I hate that.

And Safari? A browser proven to be the most insecure browser?

Sorry but IE has actually become a good browser.
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5
November 7, 2013 5:32:56 PM

Let me guess... just like IE10 for Win7.... it is "for" Windows7, but the stupid browser is skinned for Windows 8. Really really.... unprofessional. frankly its very sloppy work.
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-5
November 7, 2013 5:37:24 PM

Internet Explorer, the best web browser....

To download Chrome.
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-5
November 7, 2013 5:46:21 PM

Meh, around IE7, I stopped using it because it was bad. Switched to Mozilla, then switched to Chrome, LOVED Chrome for several years, and then one day I reformatted and I had some odd bug where I would hit the executable for Chrome and nothing would happen. I tried IE10, my backup, and it wasn't bad, so I kept using it... With IE11, it has pretty much matched Chrome at its high point. At this point, unless Chrome does something special, it's my backup browser.

Many of the people who complain about IE haven't used it for years. IE10 was competitive, IE11 is possibly the best browser on the market at the moment. My girlfriend uses Firefox, Chrome is my backup, and I prefer IE11. If you haven't touched IE in a few years, give it a try - it ain't the clunky, crash ridden piece of junk that IE was up until 10. Though, if your current browser is working for you, why change? I didn't until Chrome became temporarily unusable. Just be glad that there is another good alternative when you need it.
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2
November 7, 2013 5:48:52 PM

Skinned for Windows 8? belardo, I've used IE 10 and am currently using IE 11 and have seen no skinning at all, making me question what your complaint is actually about.
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4
November 7, 2013 5:59:12 PM

They really need to write an article, in layman's terms, as to why those in the IT profession despise IE, and the benefits of using something else.
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1
November 7, 2013 6:26:10 PM

Most IT profession don't despise IE, they mostly look at each browser from a neutral point of view. It's idiotic to say a browser sucks just because everyone else say so.
Maybe they want to be accepted in to inner "cool" circle or something?
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5
November 7, 2013 7:01:21 PM

Time to give it a shot.
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1
November 7, 2013 7:03:01 PM

The thing is, saying IE sucks, or IT professionals despise IE, is subjective opinion. Not everybody has issues with it. :-) You're welcome to point a few things out, if you think they need to be brought up.
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2
November 7, 2013 7:04:43 PM

there are some things chrome and firefox dont work with that IE does, and vice versa. I find it necessary for all to be installed on my work laptop.
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1
November 7, 2013 7:05:37 PM

LOL.. its all very fashionable and "cool" to mock IE..
But its a decent browser and since it standard .. I am quite happy for it to be my default browser.
(I do have a second browser installed to check if any issues are browser related. and most issues I see in IE are also experienced in my alt browser).
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1
November 7, 2013 7:14:01 PM

People forget Opera, it's darn good. (Anyway, IE isn't my prefered browser but it's not that bad either)
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2
November 7, 2013 7:21:03 PM

Operah who? Weren't they the ones who cried about their market share to the EU so Microsoft had to come up with an idiotic ballot screen for Europe?
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0
November 7, 2013 7:49:33 PM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
Operah who? Weren't they the ones who cried about their market share to the EU so Microsoft had to come up with an idiotic ballot screen for Europe?


Another will be RealPlayer.
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1
November 7, 2013 8:15:14 PM

I use IE because I am a rebel and like to live on the wild side. I know you guys don't dare tread into the danger that I head into.
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-1
November 7, 2013 9:05:44 PM

There is a lot of praise for IE. Personally, IE 6 - 8 kinda irreparably ruined IE for me. I think IE 9 was meh. I mean it was a huge step forward for IE, but still behind the curb compared to other browsers. I don't really have issues with Firefox at all, except when my script blocking plug in breaks some site, but that's to be expected. Chrome is nice, but I run into the same issues with script blocking. Plus I start trusting Google less and less everyday (particularly with my data), so I use that pretty sparingly. I keep IE around as fall-back/compatibility, especially considering some sites are designed exclusively for IE, so it's nice to know there is some improvement coming to Windows 7. I loathed the days of IE 6, where merely opening the browser would result in instantaneous virus infection.
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0
November 7, 2013 9:26:30 PM

Lord Jobs frowns upon Internet Explorer.
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-2
November 7, 2013 10:57:26 PM

it's nice but why did they get rid of the disable tab browsing option. I don't care for tab browsing and they removed that feature in ie11 now you are stuck with a tab next to the address bard...
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0
November 7, 2013 11:20:52 PM

Nope... just looked at some screenshots of IE11 for Win7... its flat like Win8, unlike IE9.

Opera was good... now its Chrome,with a bit of Oprera skin on it.
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0
November 7, 2013 11:43:04 PM

double post
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0
November 7, 2013 11:59:48 PM

IE had a couple of bad years, but has been back in the game recently, why aren't people dissing Firefox for laziness the way people were quick to do for IE?
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1
November 8, 2013 12:33:10 AM

IE11 wowo golly gee! Now I have a web browser to go with
AOL 12 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! and my 56k turbo charged super modem!
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-3
November 8, 2013 12:54:39 AM

jimmysmitty said:
IE11 is actually a very good browser. Its fast and it links in with MSE so it works out to be very secure.
MSE... secure... That's where I stopped reading. *Sigh...*
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-2
November 8, 2013 12:58:53 AM

I uninstalled and blocked IE10 because of too many issues, why would I want to install this new browser? Yes there are new features, updated security but I'll still block it at least for the next several month because some sites are a little slow to update their support for new IE versions (same can be said for other browsers as well). IE 9 is working fine for the few sites I do go to on it, and the clients computer I log into that run Win 8.1 with IE 11 are experiencing some hiccups on sites. It's not always a good idea to be an early adopter especially with tech, you're bound to run into hiccups in the first few months after release. I rarely if ever use chrome though I keep it up to date; I mainly use Firefox for my everyday browsing. At work we at least use Windows 7 with IE9, and not like my last job where they are still using Windows XP with IE8. It never hurts to have another browser installed just to see if a site issue is browser related or not.
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0
November 8, 2013 4:23:32 AM

How can you uninstall something you have yet to install?
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0
November 8, 2013 6:26:24 AM

I just had to fix my mother-in-law's computer because she downloaded a virus though IE-11. After removing the virus I installed Firefox and she loves it.

IE-11 might have better security protocol than the other browsers today, but that doesn't mean it is more secure. IE is just too big of a target.

As far as speed goes, I don't know what kind of rigs you guys are running, but all the browsers load pretty much instantaneously. I don't know why you would sacrifice security for a few milliseconds load time that is indistinguishable to the human eye anyway.

As far as chrome goes, I get tracked enough by google. I don't need them tracking my favorite porn sites too.
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-3
November 8, 2013 7:33:17 AM

As someone that only uses IE i welcome the new version. IE have always performed great for me. Most people only go against IE because of their enviornment. For example when you work in a coprerate enviornment like Investment Banking or a Law Firm, company IT policy forces you to use IE and it is mostly so locked down that you cannot do anything. Then they start throwing in all those add-ons from third parties and dont get me started on the one version rule as most of these comapnes do not even upgrade their browsers because their Intranet and published web apps are incompatable and do not want to spend the resources to implement a new version of the broswer. This alone makes people who work in these enviornemnts hate IE and its not IE's fault, it is conpany policys fault.

Also users need to stop blaming a browser if they are uneducated enough to download a virus. It can happen in any browser.

For example, in my office we still use IE9. They refuse to update to another version and implement a security policy that prevent anyone from installing another browser even those with admin rights.

You can imagine the frustration I go through hen i go to work and have to use a crappy IE but when i go home my IE is flawless.

Adblock Plus for IE makes it even better now.
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0
November 8, 2013 8:18:53 AM

I use Chrome a majority of the time but when chrome fails to load something, IE always loads it perfectly.
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0
November 8, 2013 9:45:53 AM

thundervore said:

Also users need to stop blaming a browser if they are uneducated enough to download a virus. It can happen in any browser.


You sound like the uneducated one.

The majority of the time, people don't download the virus, their browser does when it loads a banner ad that exploits a weekness unique to that browser. The reason why IE is always more susceptable to these viruses is because hackers target IE more because more people use it. These banner ads aren't just on porn sites either. They pop up on plenty of legitimate sites too.
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-1
November 8, 2013 10:55:11 AM

The largest problem with browser security just happens to be the people who are using the browser, not the browser itself. Grandmaster, I suspect your mother-in-law would have just as happily downloaded her virus using Firefox, if she was using that at the time. Most problems computers get into are do-it-yourself, and blaming the computer or it's software for the initial problem, isn't going to help. Furthermore, since when did any browser launch code from banner ads? Are you talking about Internet Explorer 6 that shipped with Windows XP? Also, the security of other browsers may not be a feature at all, but a lack there-of. What browser do you turn to when you need to run an ActiveX control?
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0
November 8, 2013 11:38:45 AM

If IE handled their plugins as eloquently as Chrome did, I would probably switch. MS needs to allow you to store favorite urls in Skydrive and make a small plugin like YAGBE for Chrome that lets you seemlessly access them from any computer
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0
November 8, 2013 11:46:54 AM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
The largest problem with browser security just happens to be the people who are using the browser, not the browser itself. Grandmaster, I suspect your mother-in-law would have just as happily downloaded her virus using Firefox, if she was using that at the time. Most problems computers get into are do-it-yourself, and blaming the computer or it's software for the initial problem, isn't going to help. Furthermore, since when did any browser launch code from banner ads? Are you talking about Internet Explorer 6 that shipped with Windows XP? Also, the security of other browsers may not be a feature at all, but a lack there-of. What browser do you turn to when you need to run an ActiveX control?


You are just flat out wrong.

This is from Norton's current Threat Spotlight.

http://us.norton.com/security_response/

Threat Spotlight: Trojan.Ransomlock

Trojan.Ransomlock is a detection for Trojan horse programs that lock the desktop of a compromised computer making it unusable.

The threat may arrive on the compromised computer by various means, such as visiting malicious sites, by opening untrusted links or advertisement banners, or by installing software from untrusted sources.

These programs attempt to convince the user to pay money in order to have their computer unlocked and use a variety of different techniques in order to encourage the user to pay the ransom.


More information on Trojan.Ransomlock is available in the Trojan.Ransomlock writeup.

Infection

This threat is distributed through several means. Malicious websites, or legitimate websites that have been compromised, may drop the threat onto a compromised computer. This drive-by-download often happens surreptitiously. Another method used to propagate this type of malware is spam email containing infected attachments or links to malicious websites. The threat may also be downloaded manually by tricking the user into thinking they are installing a useful piece of software. Ransomware is also prevalent on peer-to-peer file sharing websites and is often packaged with pirated or illegally acquired software.
Score
-1
November 8, 2013 11:55:17 AM

Grandmastersexsay said:
bigpinkdragon286 said:
The largest problem with browser security just happens to be the people who are using the browser, not the browser itself. Grandmaster, I suspect your mother-in-law would have just as happily downloaded her virus using Firefox, if she was using that at the time. Most problems computers get into are do-it-yourself, and blaming the computer or it's software for the initial problem, isn't going to help. Furthermore, since when did any browser launch code from banner ads? Are you talking about Internet Explorer 6 that shipped with Windows XP? Also, the security of other browsers may not be a feature at all, but a lack there-of. What browser do you turn to when you need to run an ActiveX control?


You are just flat out wrong.

This is from Norton's current Threat Spotlight.

http://us.norton.com/security_response/

Threat Spotlight: Trojan.Ransomlock

Trojan.Ransomlock is a detection for Trojan horse programs that lock the desktop of a compromised computer making it unusable.

The threat may arrive on the compromised computer by various means, such as visiting malicious sites, by opening untrusted links or advertisement banners, or by installing software from untrusted sources.

These programs attempt to convince the user to pay money in order to have their computer unlocked and use a variety of different techniques in order to encourage the user to pay the ransom.


More information on Trojan.Ransomlock is available in the Trojan.Ransomlock writeup.

Infection

This threat is distributed through several means. Malicious websites, or legitimate websites that have been compromised, may drop the threat onto a compromised computer. This drive-by-download often happens surreptitiously. Another method used to propagate this type of malware is spam email containing infected attachments or links to malicious websites. The threat may also be downloaded manually by tricking the user into thinking they are installing a useful piece of software. Ransomware is also prevalent on peer-to-peer file sharing websites and is often packaged with pirated or illegally acquired software.


Strange. I've never ran antivirus and I've never encountered anything like this running Chrome on Linux. :sarcastic:  Perhaps the problem is with the OS and not the browser?
Score
0
November 8, 2013 12:26:22 PM

JD88 said:
Grandmastersexsay said:
bigpinkdragon286 said:
The largest problem with browser security just happens to be the people who are using the browser, not the browser itself. Grandmaster, I suspect your mother-in-law would have just as happily downloaded her virus using Firefox, if she was using that at the time. Most problems computers get into are do-it-yourself, and blaming the computer or it's software for the initial problem, isn't going to help. Furthermore, since when did any browser launch code from banner ads? Are you talking about Internet Explorer 6 that shipped with Windows XP? Also, the security of other browsers may not be a feature at all, but a lack there-of. What browser do you turn to when you need to run an ActiveX control?


You are just flat out wrong.

This is from Norton's current Threat Spotlight.

http://us.norton.com/security_response/

Threat Spotlight: Trojan.Ransomlock

Trojan.Ransomlock is a detection for Trojan horse programs that lock the desktop of a compromised computer making it unusable.

The threat may arrive on the compromised computer by various means, such as visiting malicious sites, by opening untrusted links or advertisement banners, or by installing software from untrusted sources.

These programs attempt to convince the user to pay money in order to have their computer unlocked and use a variety of different techniques in order to encourage the user to pay the ransom.


More information on Trojan.Ransomlock is available in the Trojan.Ransomlock writeup.

Infection

This threat is distributed through several means. Malicious websites, or legitimate websites that have been compromised, may drop the threat onto a compromised computer. This drive-by-download often happens surreptitiously. Another method used to propagate this type of malware is spam email containing infected attachments or links to malicious websites. The threat may also be downloaded manually by tricking the user into thinking they are installing a useful piece of software. Ransomware is also prevalent on peer-to-peer file sharing websites and is often packaged with pirated or illegally acquired software.


Strange. I've never ran antivirus and I've never encountered anything like this running Chrome on Linux. :sarcastic:  Perhaps the problem is with the OS and not the browser?


It must be nice using a hobby OS and not be required to use your computer in any professional capacity. You don't have to worry about viruses since no one writes viruses for Linux because less than 2% of PCs have Linux installed at all, let alone as the primary OS.

Score
0
November 8, 2013 12:37:28 PM

Grandmastersexsay said:
JD88 said:
Grandmastersexsay said:
bigpinkdragon286 said:
The largest problem with browser security just happens to be the people who are using the browser, not the browser itself. Grandmaster, I suspect your mother-in-law would have just as happily downloaded her virus using Firefox, if she was using that at the time. Most problems computers get into are do-it-yourself, and blaming the computer or it's software for the initial problem, isn't going to help. Furthermore, since when did any browser launch code from banner ads? Are you talking about Internet Explorer 6 that shipped with Windows XP? Also, the security of other browsers may not be a feature at all, but a lack there-of. What browser do you turn to when you need to run an ActiveX control?


You are just flat out wrong.

This is from Norton's current Threat Spotlight.

http://us.norton.com/security_response/

Threat Spotlight: Trojan.Ransomlock

Trojan.Ransomlock is a detection for Trojan horse programs that lock the desktop of a compromised computer making it unusable.

The threat may arrive on the compromised computer by various means, such as visiting malicious sites, by opening untrusted links or advertisement banners, or by installing software from untrusted sources.

These programs attempt to convince the user to pay money in order to have their computer unlocked and use a variety of different techniques in order to encourage the user to pay the ransom.


More information on Trojan.Ransomlock is available in the Trojan.Ransomlock writeup.

Infection

This threat is distributed through several means. Malicious websites, or legitimate websites that have been compromised, may drop the threat onto a compromised computer. This drive-by-download often happens surreptitiously. Another method used to propagate this type of malware is spam email containing infected attachments or links to malicious websites. The threat may also be downloaded manually by tricking the user into thinking they are installing a useful piece of software. Ransomware is also prevalent on peer-to-peer file sharing websites and is often packaged with pirated or illegally acquired software.


Strange. I've never ran antivirus and I've never encountered anything like this running Chrome on Linux. :sarcastic:  Perhaps the problem is with the OS and not the browser?


It must be nice using a hobby OS and not be required to use your computer in any professional capacity. You don't have to worry about viruses since no one writes viruses for Linux because less than 2% of PCs have Linux installed at all, let alone as the primary OS.



Hmm. I suppose all Android app development is a hobby then. I also suppose everything Google does at their headquarters is a hobby too. I suppose everything the U.S. Air Force, Navy, and NASA does is also a hobby.

In all seriousness, part of it is indeed low user base and therefore low interest. However, Linux is inherently more secure than Windows. There's a reason it is used on the International Space Station after their Windows PCs got infected a few years back.

http://www.computerweekly.com/blogs/open-source-insider...

Linux is where the big boys play. Windows is for Office work.
Score
0
November 8, 2013 1:13:06 PM

"The threat may arrive on the compromised computer by various means, such as visiting malicious sites, by opening untrusted links or advertisement banners, or by installing software from untrusted sources."

How have you proven me wrong when your own quote backs my point? In all of the attack vectors listed, it requires the user to initiate the intrusion of the unwanted software.
Score
1
November 8, 2013 6:40:17 PM

Actually most of you are wrong it's java and flash that has security issues and most infections are from sites with ads that exploit them.
Block ads and you won't get infected unless the code is imbedded in the web page itself.
I run a virtual machine and browse bad sites with ad blockers and scan after so far i have yet to see an infection.
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0
November 8, 2013 6:49:11 PM

huh huh,,,, IE is the best browser to download another browser..... LOL!!!
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-1
November 8, 2013 6:50:14 PM

Bwahahaha!!! IE for me is the best browser... to download another browser LOL !!!
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-1
November 8, 2013 6:50:42 PM

Bwahahaha!!! IE for me is the best browser... to download another browser LOL !!!
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-1
!