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First computer build, need advice.

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January 6, 2014 11:29:32 PM

I've done quite a bit of research and feel that I'm competent enough to put together my own PC. The primary reason for the computer is gaming. I just want to make sure that all the parts of have picked out will go together and are worth the price.

Case:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Hard drive:
http://www.amazon.com/WD-Blue-Desktop-Hard-Drive/dp/B00...

GPU:
http://www.amazon.com/PNY-GeForce-DisplayPort-PCI-Expre...

RAM:
http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Vengeance-PC3-12800-1600m...

Motherboard:
http://www.amazon.com/ASUS-P8Z77-V-LX-Intel-Motherboard...

Processor:
http://www.amazon.com/Intel-Core-i5-3350P-Quad-Core-Pro...

PSU:
http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Builder-Series-Watt-CX600...

I was aiming to spend about $900 and these components almost fit that perfectly. Any advice on these components or changes I should make would be appreciated. Thanks.

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January 7, 2014 4:45:53 AM

Just a few thoughts. First, make sure the RAM you selected is compatible with your motherboard. Either visit the motherboard's webpage and look to see if your RAM is in the QVL for compatible memory or go to the memory maker's website and use their RAM configurator program/app, just tell it your motherboard and they will list all compatible memory they make. Second, I'd advise looking for a non-CX series PSU from Corsair or getting a PSU from Seasonic, XFX, or Antec. Lastly, unless you are planning to SLI in the future, you don't necessarily need a "Z" series motherboard.
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January 7, 2014 4:23:16 PM

animal said:
Just a few thoughts. First, make sure the RAM you selected is compatible with your motherboard. Either visit the motherboard's webpage and look to see if your RAM is in the QVL for compatible memory or go to the memory maker's website and use their RAM configurator program/app, just tell it your motherboard and they will list all compatible memory they make. Second, I'd advise looking for a non-CX series PSU from Corsair or getting a PSU from Seasonic, XFX, or Antec. Lastly, unless you are planning to SLI in the future, you don't necessarily need a "Z" series motherboard.


Thanks. I did check Corsairs web site and found a different set of ram that it said for sure would be compatible with the motherboard.
http://www.corsair.com/us/vengeance-8gb-dual-channel-dd...
I'll have to do some more research on a different PSU. Any reason you wouldn't recommend CX series?
Also, I do plan to SLI in the future.
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January 7, 2014 4:41:19 PM

While Corsair generally does make quality PSUs, their CX series is the budget line and uses cheap low-quality capacitors in the builds. For a low-end to moderate system they might be sufficient, but with your planning to SLI in the future, I'd get one of their better series PSU or one listed from the previously mentioned manufacturers.
Here is a link to a reference page that has recommended system wattages based upon the type and amount of GPUs:

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

If you plan on changing CPUs in the future in order to overclock, you will want to add 50-100W onto the recommendations. And if you do change to an overclocking capable CPU (Intel "K" series), don't forget that you will need an aftermarket CPU cooler.
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January 7, 2014 5:48:03 PM

animal said:
While Corsair generally does make quality PSUs, their CX series is the budget line and uses cheap low-quality capacitors in the builds. For a low-end to moderate system they might be sufficient, but with your planning to SLI in the future, I'd get one of their better series PSU or one listed from the previously mentioned manufacturers.
Here is a link to a reference page that has recommended system wattages based upon the type and amount of GPUs:

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

If you plan on changing CPUs in the future in order to overclock, you will want to add 50-100W onto the recommendations. And if you do change to an overclocking capable CPU (Intel "K" series), don't forget that you will need an aftermarket CPU cooler.


Thanks again. I did look at the link you left, I think a 600 watt PSU should do the trick for now. I don't plan to SLI for quite sometime, and when I do I'll be sure to upgrade the PSU. I found a Corsair TX series on Newegg I could fit into the budget that I think would work.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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