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Setup for whole house networking

Tags:
  • Networking
  • Cable
  • cat
  • Switch
  • cat6
  • home
  • Ethernet Card
Last response: in Networking
February 19, 2014 5:27:29 AM

I'm moving into an old house, so therefore thick walls, where the phone line enters at the far end of the house. In order to achevie wifi coverage across the entire house and wired internet for certain rooms I intend to run the setup below, will this work and is there anything that should be changed?

ADSL router far end of house --> 24 port unmanaged switch --> wired through conduits put in walls to multiple access points / devices that need wired connection around the house

If this a good way of doing the setup, will this cable be good enough if run in a bundle http://www.scan.co.uk/products/305m-cat6enhanced-23awg-...
and is it better to use wall sockets at the ends of the cables or can the conduits simply lead to an opening with the cables terminated therefore easily allowing more cables to be added and in future easily upgrade cables? Thanks

More about : setup house networking

February 19, 2014 6:59:57 AM

The cat6e cable will be fine. Depending on local building codes, you may be required to terminate those conduits into an outlet box with an RJ-45/ethernet cover plate. If you don't care about building codes, then you can leave your conduit exposed at an opening. Individual cable length shouldn't exceed 100m.
February 19, 2014 8:56:23 AM

Cat6e cable is designed for 10g it maybe overkill for what you need almost nobody has a 10g device used in home environments yet. Cat5e will run 1g and cost about 1/3 at the particular company you linked. If you are running conduit it will be trivial to replace the cable 5yrs from now if you need 10g stuff and by then the cost of cat6e cable will likely be lots cheaper.

What is very strange is this company has no specs on the cat6e cable. Other than them indicating it has the non flammable jacket required in commercial building they have nothing else. This jacket also increases the price of the cable. The key thing that makes cable be able to run 10g if the ability to run higher frequencies. All the short cat6a cable they sell they very clearly specify this. If this is normal cat6 cable as opposed to cat6a or cat6e (different names for the same) then it is a complete waste of money since normal cat6 cable can only run 10g a shorter lengths.
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February 19, 2014 9:10:42 AM

bill001g said:
Cat6e cable is designed for 10g it maybe overkill for what you need almost nobody has a 10g device used in home environments yet. Cat5e will run 1g and cost about 1/3 at the particular company you linked. If you are running conduit it will be trivial to replace the cable 5yrs from now if you need 10g stuff and by then the cost of cat6e cable will likely be lots cheaper.

What is very strange is this company has no specs on the cat6e cable. Other than them indicating it has the non flammable jacket required in commercial building they have nothing else. This jacket also increases the price of the cable. The key thing that makes cable be able to run 10g if the ability to run higher frequencies. All the short cat6a cable they sell they very clearly specify this. If this is normal cat6 cable as opposed to cat6a or cat6e (different names for the same) then it is a complete waste of money since normal cat6 cable can only run 10g a shorter lengths.


Sorry to go off topic... bill001g, have you checked your PM's lately? You should have a message from our Community manager.
February 19, 2014 9:20:28 AM

Cable choice aside is this the best way to achieve Ethernet across the house? In regard to the cable if running 50m lengths in bundles is the cat5e still capable of 1g or will the speed reduce at these distances, also does being near power sockets/wires have any effect? In regard to the wall plate will there be any performance difference between the two?
February 19, 2014 11:37:33 AM

Can't help much with technicals, but. I just ran cable to much of my home. I terminated them at the wall in every place but one. It looks cleaner on the wall and allows the device to be placed at whatever length the patch cable will go to. The only place I ran straight through was the the switch in the TV cabinet because it is fixed in place. I used Cat 6e because I didn't know better. But you don't need the commercial plenum rated cable for behind the wall residential use, at least I have been told this is true for the U. S. It is way to expensive. Most commercial installations I have seen put the Ethernet about a foot away from the power outlet since they are needed in tandem.
February 19, 2014 12:31:18 PM

Cat5e works to 100m at 1g and we have bundled many 100s of cables in the cable trays in the ceiling. You generally only have issue with electrical cable if you run it parallel to the cable. Even then I suspect it would have to almost be touching. The only time I have ever seen a issue is when a installer ran the cable though a florescent fixture and almost wrapped it around the ballast. This is a big time code violation so he should have known better since he was a licensed electrician.

Wall plates are a personal preference. I don't care so much but certain other people I live with think it looks messy to not have the plate
February 20, 2014 4:59:02 PM

That company you listed sells it. I don't know if it is a good price or not for where you are located. Last stuff I got from the local home improvement store.

The key stuff to avoid is called CCA. This is aluminum covered copper. You want solid copper wires. This CCA stuff is very cheap but it does not meet the standards. If your search amazon you will see mostly cca cable. The cable technically must meet ETA/TIA-568B standards to be used for data cable.

That switch will be as good as any others. There is very little difference in these devices they all can pass data at 1g up and 1g down on all ports at the same time.