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Why are there no monitors above 1920x1080 @ 100+hz?

I have always wondered why there are no monitors above 1920x1080 that can go above 60Hz?

Do they not want to or just cannot due to technical issues?

Always wondered why since Google doesn't appear to know.
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about monitors 1920x1080 100
  1. Look for some 3D ready models they are 120Hz
  2. I'm using a 2560x1440 Monitor at 120Hz right now.
    QX2710LED, cost me $300.

    The thing is, by default from what I've seen no monitors above 1080p do come with out of the box 120Hz support. However, you can force your display adapter to output signals at a higher refresh rate and the monitor may still accept it.

    The cheap Korean 2560x1440p monitors use panels from say LG (like my QNIX) then use a bypass board inside. This basically leads to not having on OSD for adjusting the monitors settings, you can only adjust brightness. However, it means there is nothing in the way of forcing the panel to display non-native refresh rates such as 120Hz.

    So technically there ARE monitors above 1920x1080 resolution that CAN do over 100Hz, but not 'out of the box'. As well, your mileage may vary for how high of a refresh rate the panel may display without artifacts.
  3. littleleo said:
    Look for some 3D ready models they are 120Hz

    I assume you need a monitor above 60hz for 3D?
  4. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236313

    There are very few above 75/85 Hz. Most are 60. It has to do with the video cards and what not.
  5. Aphala said:
    littleleo said:
    Look for some 3D ready models they are 120Hz

    I assume you need a monitor above 60hz for 3D?


    Think of 3D using to two images so you have 60Hz for each side.
  6. Best answer
    Because the next resolution up 2560x1440 @ 120Hz would be pushing more data through a dual link DVI cable than it can actually support. You can overclock some korean models (which i have safely at 96Hz) but you will notice once you approach 100-120Hz you will start to drop some frames due to the limitation of the cable itself.

    Some people will buy a heavy duty DVI cable that can support more bandwidth to get better results. From personal experience and from other reviews I have read you can usually get up to around 100Hz on a normal cable with no issues if the monitor you buy over clocks.
  7. burdenbound said:
    Because the next resolution up 2560x1440 @ 120Hz would be pushing more data through a dual link DVI cable than it can actually support. You can overclock some korean models (which i have safely at 96Hz) but you will notice once you approach 100-120Hz you will start to drop some frames due to the limitation of the cable itself.

    Some people will buy a heavy duty DVI cable that can support more bandwidth to get better results. From personal experience and from other reviews I have read you can usually get up to around 100Hz on a normal cable with no issues if the monitor you buy over clocks.



    Thank you, EXACTLY what I wanted to know, never understood why haha I guess HDMI 2.0 will bring about some change on the playing field!
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