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Need advice: General Productivity and Light Gaming PC

Tags:
  • Gaming
  • Productivity
  • Systems
  • Light
Last response: in Systems
March 29, 2014 9:35:28 AM

I am putting together a general productivity and light gaming PC for family use. Any suggestions on the rig below? I have an existing ATX case and Windows 7 Ultimate retail license that I am not including here.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H87-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($104.79 @ Amazon)
Memory: A-Data XPG V2 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($68.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Constellation ES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($60.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7770 1GB Video Card ($105.38 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 400W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Mwave)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($22.95 @ Amazon)
Total: $632.09
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-29 12:32 EDT-0400)

More about : advice general productivity light gaming

March 29, 2014 5:59:34 PM

What do your family do for "general productivity"?

If you change the CPU to an i3-4130 ($125) and apply the to graphics if you want it look better when playing modern games (higher settings). You could also go with the lower clocked i5-4430 (for around $190).
March 29, 2014 11:54:11 PM

General productivity is mostly general MS Office apps, perhaps some light Photoshop and video editing.

I did some research on the i5, and it looks like the sweet spot for price is the 4750 at $30 cheaper. I bumped up the video card to the Gigabyte Radeon R7 260x. Based on the review on this site, it looks like the performance is about 1/3 better.

Anyone have any input of the power supply? SeaSonic is generally a good brand, but I know nothing about this particular model.

With the changes, PCPartPicker estimates the power usage at ~300W. Is a 400W PS big enough?

I have several PATA DVD drives on hand. Can someone recommend a reliable PATA to SATA converter? The ones I have found so far are generally not well reviewed.

Here's the updated config:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H87-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($104.79 @ Amazon)
Memory: A-Data XPG V2 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($68.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Constellation ES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($60.00)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R7 260X 1GB Video Card ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 400W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Mwave)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($22.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $616.73
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-30 02:50 EDT-0400)
Related resources
March 30, 2014 2:47:04 PM

I'm running slightly more power-hungry components on a Corsair CX430. There's a list of recommended PSUs: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/322966-28-list-recomm...

That seasonic power supply doesn't seem like it's that great. You can look through the charts in the article, but from the conclusion page referring to output voltage of that OEM Seasonic model "Seasonic OEM unit could not run within specs".
http://www.anandtech.com/show/2697/45

The 450 W rosewill capstone from the recommended PSU list seems like a better choice as it's both Haswell compatible (otherwise you may need to disable C6/C7 states in the BIOS) and supplies decent power to the http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

That i5-4570 looks good.
March 30, 2014 4:39:58 PM

Thanks for the info on the PS. The Rosewill sounds like the way to go. The extra power efficiency is a bonus.

Here's my final component list. Any last suggestions? Do I need Thermal Compound or is the material supplied with the CPU fine?

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H87-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($104.79 @ Amazon)
Memory: A-Data XPG V2 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($68.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Constellation ES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($60.00)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R7 260X 1GB Video Card ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 450W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $618.73
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-30 19:37 EDT-0400)

March 30, 2014 5:57:26 PM

When I built my tower with an i5-2400 a few years ago, the thermal material was strips already on the heatsync and it worked fine. Maybe check your old case to make sure that the fins on the ram have clearance from hdd cages. I can't think of anything else to change.