What size TV do you use to play classic games?

Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

You've all seen pictures of my basement, right? I have 10 television
sets down there (long story... there is a certain brand I collect, and
buy every time I see one at a thrift store..)

Anyway, I personally like to play on a 19 or 20 inch screen, as that is
pretty much the standard of an ARCADE game, so naturally it would
follow to try to hook home systems up to this standard.

I have one table available down there that I'm thinking of doing
something with, like hooking up a computer system with perepherals
(Commodore or Atari computer with disc drives, perepherals, etc.. or
perhaps an Intellivision computer setup, or even an Adam!). The trouble
is, this particular table is long enough, but not quite big enough to
hold a 19 inch TV. I have a small 13 inch TV that would fit perfect,
but I don't know how I feel about playing games on a smaller screen.

What are your thoughts about this? On one hand, I really like to stick
with the 19 inch.. on the other hand, didn't a lot of classic game
displays in stores (atari,intellivision) use a 13 inch screen? I guess
I could use that to reconcile the whole small screen thing if you know
what I mean. I'm trying to figure out what to do. What types of TV's do
you hook your games up to?

Any advice appreciated. Thank you.
29 answers Last reply
More about size play classic games
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    I alternate between a DLP XGA front projector displaying a 100" screen
    (with everything upconvereted to 1080i) to a 13" Commodore 1084s that
    I can flip on it's side for vertically oriented games like Xevious.

    A pretty big difference, but both have their advantages. It freaks
    people out to see Pac-man taking up their entire wall. ;-)

    All my classic gaming these days is done with a a hacked Xbox running
    emulators. All of it in one convenient box.
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    "The Space Boss" <drsmith666@aol.com> wrote in
    news:1127269169.264655.234560@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:

    > What are your thoughts about this? On one hand, I really like to stick
    > with the 19 inch.. on the other hand, didn't a lot of classic game
    > displays in stores (atari,intellivision) use a 13 inch screen? I guess
    > I could use that to reconcile the whole small screen thing if you know
    > what I mean.

    Tough call. Really tough call. Most demos I'd seen before the mid-90s
    used smaller TVs, so I think you'd have no problem feeling "authentic".
    however, do you really think you'd be comfortable playing on that size
    set in this room? I don't know... only you can answer that. If you can
    hook up your small-screen set, and see it and be happy, go for it.

    Or hell, get a new table.

    >I'm trying to figure out what to do. What types of TV's do
    > you hook your games up to?

    I'm the wrong person to ask this. The reason being, my setup is
    designed more to suit my immediate needs than it is to make my
    "dream game room". I do most of my gaming on a 13" TV, because it
    fits aside of my desk where I do most of my work (and most of my
    playing). Occasionally, I'll hook something up to the 27" set in
    the family room, but not often.

    My goal is to eventually settle on a nice 45-55" HDTV set, and take
    my display totally modern. When it happens, I'm setting up things
    *right*.


    --

    Aaron J. Bossig

    http://www.GodsLabRat.com
    http://www.dvdverdict.com
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > Tough call. Really tough call. Most demos I'd seen before the mid-90s
    > used smaller TVs, so I think you'd have no problem feeling "authentic".
    > however, do you really think you'd be comfortable playing on that size
    > set in this room? I don't know... only you can answer that. If you can
    > hook up your small-screen set, and see it and be happy, go for it.

    If you remember correctly TVs were much smaller in the 80s. Our 'family
    big screen' was probably 25 inches. The TV I used to play most of my
    games on was a circa 1980 Sears 12 or 13inch set that was at least in
    color. Anyway, screw that. The only displays I have that are smaller
    than 15inches are a few old C= monitors I still have. Sometimes I'll
    hook up a system to one of those because they have excellent clairty,
    much better than a TV set. But for the most part I use my 61in NTSC
    RPTV.

    There's being authentic, then there's being practical.

    = numsix
    = http://www.villagebbs.com
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    rob_ocelot@hotmail.com wrote:
    > I alternate between a DLP XGA front projector displaying a 100" screen
    > (with everything upconvereted to 1080i) to a 13" Commodore 1084s that
    > I can flip on it's side for vertically oriented games like Xevious.

    I though Xevious was a top down shooter??

    >
    > A pretty big difference, but both have their advantages. It freaks
    > people out to see Pac-man taking up their entire wall. ;-)
    >
    > All my classic gaming these days is done with a a hacked Xbox running
    > emulators. All of it in one convenient box.

    do they sell hacked xboxes on ebay?
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    In article <1127269169.264655.234560@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
    "The Space Boss" <drsmith666@aol.com> wrote:

    > Any advice appreciated. Thank you.

    I use my 27" screen...

    But I have access to an 8-foot screen ;)
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    The Space Boss wrote:
    > rob_ocelot@hotmail.com wrote:
    > > I alternate between a DLP XGA front projector displaying a 100" screen
    > > (with everything upconvereted to 1080i) to a 13" Commodore 1084s that
    > > I can flip on it's side for vertically oriented games like Xevious.
    >
    > I though Xevious was a top down shooter??

    It is, but the monitor is in 'portrait' orientation (taller than it is
    wide) in the upright. If you were to view this on a horizontal monitor
    you would end up playing the game in a vertical stripe down the center
    of the screen -- not a very good use of the screen real estate. You
    could also play the game in cocktail mode, but that just puts the same
    sized vertical stripe to the left and the score/lives display on the
    right. On the PS1 Namco museum disks you could select a rotated screen
    with the dip switch settings and turn your monitor/TV on it's side.
    Xbox Mame lets you do the same thing. Pretty darn close to the arcade
    experience.

    > > A pretty big difference, but both have their advantages. It freaks
    > > people out to see Pac-man taking up their entire wall. ;-)
    > >
    > > All my classic gaming these days is done with a a hacked Xbox running
    > > emulators. All of it in one convenient box.
    >
    > do they sell hacked xboxes on ebay?

    Definitely not, since mod chips or softmodded Xboxes are considered
    illegal in some areas -- though not in Canada. Best bet is to find
    someone locally or check the buy/sell forums on www.xbox-scene.com for
    someone selling a modded xbox with an upgraded hard drive (for MAME
    you'd want around 4 Gigs, Daphne laserdisk mpegs can take up about
    15-20 Gigs, An entire Amiga library would use up about 7 Gigs, etc.
    The stock Xbox has either a 10 or 20 Gig HD in it (of which only 8 is
    actually useable).
  7. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > Definitely not, since mod chips or softmodded Xboxes are considered
    > illegal in some areas -- though not in Canada. Best bet is to find
    > someone locally or check the buy/sell forums on www.xbox-scene.com for
    > someone selling a modded xbox with an upgraded hard drive (for MAME
    > you'd want around 4 Gigs, Daphne laserdisk mpegs can take up about
    > 15-20 Gigs, An entire Amiga library would use up about 7 Gigs, etc.
    > The stock Xbox has either a 10 or 20 Gig HD in it (of which only 8 is
    > actually useable).

    You still see modded XBOXs on ebay from time to time, generally if you
    avoid the buzzwords you can get away with it, but prices are nuts. The
    easiest way to mod an xbox is to just softmod it. You just need any
    xbox, a memory card and one of a handful of games, like 007 Agent Under
    Fire. It takes all of 5 minutes to do the mod once you know what you're
    doing, and works like a charm.

    The XBOX has 8GB or HD space, but actually only 4.5 or so is usable for
    games, etc. But, if you can play emulators/games, etc. off DVD+Rs just
    fine, so that's one way around the hard drive limitation. Also, it is
    possible to upgrade the hard drive on a soft mod, although I've never
    done it. You can find all sorts of tutorials and such with google.

    As far as emulation goes, nothing short of a MediaPC or something like
    that beats an X-Box. Even then, i'd argue the X-BOX is better simply
    because its so easy, total plug and play, tons of controllers, etc. No
    drivers, no hassle. It will also run you about $1,000 cheaper than a
    MediaPC as well!

    = numsix
    = http://www.villagebbs.com
  8. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    Jack (www.villagebbs.com) wrote:


    > The
    > easiest way to mod an xbox is to just softmod it. You just need any
    > xbox, a memory card and one of a handful of games, like 007 Agent Under
    > Fire. It takes all of 5 minutes to do the mod once you know what you're
    > doing, and works like a charm.
    >

    How do you do it??
  9. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > > Fire. It takes all of 5 minutes to do the mod once you know what you're
    > > doing, and works like a charm.
    > >
    >
    > How do you do it??

    Ask the people who feed you what google is.

    Hint: Has nothing to do with M-network games.

    = numsix
    = http://www.villagebbs.com
  10. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    Do you have a computer with MAME set up down there too? Turn the monitor
    on its side, then set MAME to shift the display by 90 degrees. Then get
    one of those arcade controllers for your PC. ROCK.
  11. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    Jack (www.villagebbs.com) wrote:
    > The only displays I have that are smaller than 15inches are a
    > few old C= monitors I still have. Sometimes I'll hook up a
    > system to one of those because they have excellent clairty,
    > much better than a TV set.

    Frantic, 2D shooting games seem better on my C= monitor. I think
    the small size of the screen allows the eye to take in the entire
    playfield, lessening the chances of dying from some unseen
    projectile catching your vision off guard. Plus, it's a snap to
    flip the monitor vertically to play in "tate" mode.

    --crymad
  12. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    rob_ocelot@hotmail.com wrote:
    > The Space Boss wrote:
    >> do they sell hacked xboxes on ebay?
    >
    >
    > Definitely not, since mod chips or softmodded Xboxes are
    > considered illegal in some areas -- though not in Canada. Best
    > bet is to find someone locally or check the buy/sell forums on
    > www.xbox-scene.com for someone selling a modded xbox with an
    > upgraded hard drive

    Your local craigslist is a good way to find a mod job. I had mine
    done this way -- I wanted a hard drive upgrade and didn't want to
    attempt it on my own. Total cost was $45 plus cost of hard drive.
    Plus cost of Xbox, of course.

    The potential for easy emulation was the initial draw. But the
    Media Center is getting quite a workout too. Download video,
    transfer them to Xbox via disc or FTP with crossover cable, and
    enjoy on the big screen. Or put the Xbox on your network, and you
    don't even have to bother with transferring.

    --crymad
  13. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    The 2600 goes on a 25" Sanyo and the Jag goes on a 45" Mitsubishi.
  14. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    MrBiggles wrote:
    > Do you have a computer with MAME set up down there too? Turn the monitor
    > on its side, then set MAME to shift the display by 90 degrees. Then get
    > one of those arcade controllers for your PC. ROCK.

    Yes sir I do.. I don't have all the ROMS, but I have a lot of them. I
    also have another computer that is EXCLUSIVELY dedicated to NEO RAGE
    (but I also have Neo Geo CD, AES *AND* MVS down there as well so maybe
    it's overkill
  15. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > The 2600 goes on a 25" Sanyo and the Jag goes on a 45" Mitsubishi.

    I had high hopes for the Atari Jag. I mean I totally dumped my SNES in
    order to buy one.
  16. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    Me, too, considering the last game system I bought before my Jag in
    1995 was a Colecovision back in 1982...although I still like playing
    the ol' Jag (just yesterday I was messing about with Hover Strike and
    Worms). I think a game like Tempest 2000 really shows off the system,
    people like Raiden, and back in the day Alien vs. Predator was pretty
    neat and it still elicits a generally positive reaction in this climate
    of Half-Life 2 et al. Attack of the Mutant Penguins, Brutal Sports
    Football, and Primal Rage get a lot of play, too.
  17. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > Me, too, considering the last game system I bought before my Jag in
    > 1995 was a Colecovision back in 1982...although I still like playing
    > the ol' Jag (just yesterday I was messing about with Hover Strike and
    > Worms). I think a game like Tempest 2000 really shows off the system,
    > people like Raiden, and back in the day Alien vs. Predator was pretty
    > neat and it still elicits a generally positive reaction in this climate
    > of Half-Life 2 et al. Attack of the Mutant Penguins, Brutal Sports
    > Football, and Primal Rage get a lot of play, too.

    I'll go on record: The Atari Jaguar is by far, the worst mass marketed
    game system of the last 25 years. Take away Tempest 2000 and maybe 1 or
    2 other games, and you've got a few (and I mean a few) 'OK' titles
    (mostly ports) and a lot of just unplayable garbage.

    = numsix
    = http://www.villagebbs.com
  18. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > Jack (www.villagebbs.com) wrote:
    >> The only displays I have that are smaller than 15inches are a
    >> few old C= monitors I still have. Sometimes I'll hook up a
    >> system to one of those because they have excellent clairty,
    >> much better than a TV set.
    >
    > Frantic, 2D shooting games seem better on my C= monitor. I think
    > the small size of the screen allows the eye to take in the entire
    > playfield, lessening the chances of dying from some unseen
    > projectile catching your vision off guard. Plus, it's a snap to
    > flip the monitor vertically to play in "tate" mode.

    I'd have to agree with this. I have a 1702 and things are much easier to watch
    on a smaller screen. For when I want to sit on the floor I hook up to a small
    TV. Playing Geometry Wars on the big screen means a lot of darting eyes. :)

    I tried playing Galaga on the new 25" reunion cabinets and had a real tough
    time. Too much screen real estate.

    ~telengard

    --
    ..--------------------------------------------------,--------.
    | Brian Sturk - http://users.adelphia.net/~bsturk \ C/C++ | .> )\,^a__
    |-------------------------. bsturk<AT>adelphia.net | Python |( _ _)/ /-."~
    | http://www.telengard.com `------------------------`-------| `( )_ )/
    | Telengard Technologies Inc. - NT/*nix UI & device drivers |_<_s_<_s
    `-----------------------------------------------------------'
  19. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    Brian Sturk wrote:
    > Playing Geometry Wars on the big screen means a lot of darting
    > eyes.

    I just learned of this secret game in PGR2 for Xbox. Is there any
    way to play it without having PGR2? Perhaps an isolated
    stand-alone game that someone extracted and put online?

    --crymad
  20. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    Robert J Batina wrote:
    > The Space Boss <drsmith666@aol.com> spewed:
    > > You've all seen pictures of my basement, right?
    >
    > URL pls, kthnx.
    >

    I had to take them off my FTP space so that I could post my audio
    files. Incidentally, you can hear the songs at

    www.angelfire.com/ca2/lcsboots

    I will, however take some new pictures and post them when I can figure
    out how to get some more space.
  21. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    The Space Boss <drsmith666@aol.com> spewed:
    > You've all seen pictures of my basement, right?

    URL pls, kthnx.


    --
    Visit My Site: http://www.rubbertoe.com
  22. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > Brian Sturk wrote:
    >> Playing Geometry Wars on the big screen means a lot of darting
    >> eyes.
    >
    > I just learned of this secret game in PGR2 for Xbox. Is there any
    > way to play it without having PGR2? Perhaps an isolated
    > stand-alone game that someone extracted and put online?

    I wish there was. I would ***love*** to put this in my MAME cab. Haven't
    found a way yet. There is another version that will be in the next
    version of Project Gotham racing. Funny thing is, I bought PRR2 just for
    Geometry Wars and have yet to (and probably won't) play it.

    ~telengard

    --
    ..--------------------------------------------------,--------.
    | Brian Sturk - http://users.adelphia.net/~bsturk \ C/C++ | .> )\,^a__
    |-------------------------. bsturk<AT>adelphia.net | Python |( _ _)/ /-."~
    | http://www.telengard.com `------------------------`-------| `( )_ )/
    | Telengard Technologies Inc. - NT/*nix UI & device drivers |_<_s_<_s
    `-----------------------------------------------------------'
  23. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > It's a tough call... what truly was the worst post-1980 system?
    > I'm going to give my vote to the N-Gage. Terrible design, awful
    > marketing, mediocre games, and to top it all off, mostly unneeded.
    > It entered the market to try and provide an alternative to Nintendo's
    > portable systems, but really all it did was clone a GBA and then
    > make it worse.

    I don't consider the n-gage to be a mass marketed game system. It's an
    attempt and some silly phone/game hybrid. If you open it up to that
    sort of thing, there are tons of 'mini-systems' and other such dreck
    that makes the 7800 and Jag look amazing by comparison. The Tiger
    R-Zone for instance, a 'psuedo' system that used "LCD cartridges" was
    absolute junk.. but you could stretch and say it was a system since it
    had most of the core elements even if it was non-traditional.

    = numsix
    = http://www.villagebbs.com
  24. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > It's a hard distinction to make... I'd also considered nominating the
    > Sega 32X or CD-i, but those systems I at least found mildly interesting.
    > But if we allow the likes of N-Gage in, surely the Game.com gets a mention
    > too.

    The 32x was a bit of a loss, but it had some merit. I remember the 32x
    vs. the Jaguar was the big debate of that one christmas. Kind of a sad
    proposition either way. However, I still take the 32x anyday. The games
    were more polished and were quality. I mean, compare say Fight for Life
    to Virtual Fighter. The 32x version may have been low rent, but damn,
    it was better than fight for life. Etc. Etc.

    The CD-i tried to be too many things, but once again I give it props
    for having the best versions of all the Laserdisc games at the time,
    especially with the MPEG-1 cart. Actually, it was the first system to
    run a 'true' FMV version of Dragon's Lair, the other CD versions at the
    time only animated the moving bits over a static background. I guess
    due to size limitations. The CD-i also boasts the only home version of
    some rare LD games like Freedom Fighter. But all that would depend on
    if you like LD games. I do, but many people don't. But even then, the
    CD-i had some OK funutainment, could play VCDs and had at least a few
    somewhat entertaining games, like Burn: Cycle.

    Finally the game.com, Tiger finally steps up with a 'real' system.
    Unfortuneately when your machine chugs when trying to play the opening
    animation, you know you've got problems. Touch screen never really went
    anywhere, nice resolution compared to the GB, and the 2nd version had a
    nice backlight.. but most of the games were sluggish and iffy. Played
    an OK version of Monopoly or Frogger, and most of the 'Williams
    Classics' played OK. Had a lot of impobable ports, like Resident Evil
    2, but at least they tried, only question was -- should they have?

    = numsix
    = http://www.villagebbs.com
  25. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > I wish someone would come out a full color 3D system... I think console
    > systems should concentrate on the next level of 'virtual reality' that
    > worring about being a PC alternative.

    The Sega Master System was a 'full color 3-d' system back in '88, and
    it worked quite well. Used the exact same shutter system they still use
    today in many 3-D applications, such as those 3-D DVD sets.

    Too bad it never really caught on, it did work well. We maybe in for a
    return to 3D with people like James Cameron and George Lucas looking to
    bring it back to theatres. Imax 3-D has been around for a few years and
    looks absolutely fantastic. Problem is, you need a proper system.. the
    'red/blue' glasses just don't cut it.

    = numsix
    = http://www.villagebbs.com
  26. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    "Jack (www.villagebbs.com)" <lupin3@planetjurai.com> wrote in
    news:1127791564.974540.293400@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com:

    >> It's a tough call... what truly was the worst post-1980 system?
    >> I'm going to give my vote to the N-Gage. Terrible design, awful
    >> marketing, mediocre games, and to top it all off, mostly unneeded.
    >> It entered the market to try and provide an alternative to Nintendo's
    >> portable systems, but really all it did was clone a GBA and then
    >> make it worse.
    >
    > I don't consider the n-gage to be a mass marketed game system. It's an
    > attempt and some silly phone/game hybrid. If you open it up to that
    > sort of thing, there are tons of 'mini-systems' and other such dreck
    > that makes the 7800 and Jag look amazing by comparison. The Tiger
    > R-Zone for instance, a 'psuedo' system that used "LCD cartridges" was
    > absolute junk.. but you could stretch and say it was a system since it
    > had most of the core elements even if it was non-traditional.

    It's a hard distinction to make... I'd also considered nominating the
    Sega 32X or CD-i, but those systems I at least found mildly interesting.
    But if we allow the likes of N-Gage in, surely the Game.com gets a mention
    too.

    --

    Aaron J. Bossig

    http://www.GodsLabRat.com
    http://www.dvdverdict.com
  27. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    > I think the ship has sailed on this whole VR thing. The idea was
    > polished long before the technology existed to make it work, and by
    > the time the technology was here, some great things were happening
    > with our non-VR consoles

    We may yet see a return of VR, but for that to happen the HMDs (or
    something that achieves the same) needs to be sharper, cheaper and more
    comfortable than the units we've seen so far. We're probably still a
    ways away from that.

    = numsix
    = http://www.villagebbs.com
  28. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    "Jack (www.villagebbs.com)" <lupin3@planetjurai.com> wrote in
    news:1127793811.076742.103340@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:

    >> It's a hard distinction to make... I'd also considered nominating the
    >> Sega 32X or CD-i, but those systems I at least found mildly
    >> interesting. But if we allow the likes of N-Gage in, surely the
    >> Game.com gets a mention too.
    >
    > The 32x was a bit of a loss, but it had some merit. I remember the 32x
    > vs. the Jaguar was the big debate of that one christmas. Kind of a sad
    > proposition either way. However, I still take the 32x anyday. The
    > games were more polished and were quality. I mean, compare say Fight
    > for Life to Virtual Fighter. The 32x version may have been low rent,
    > but damn, it was better than fight for life. Etc. Etc.

    Interesting... what about SegaCD vs. 3DO? That's another quagmire.


    --

    Aaron J. Bossig

    http://www.GodsLabRat.com
    http://www.dvdverdict.com
  29. Archived from groups: rec.games.video.classic (More info?)

    "VastFear" <vastfear@csinet.net> wrote in
    news:OK-dne8Z_LsiI6XeRVn-gA@csinet.net:

    > I wish someone would come out a full color 3D system... I think
    > console systems should concentrate on the next level of 'virtual
    > reality' that worring about being a PC alternative.

    I think the ship has sailed on this whole VR thing. The idea was
    polished long before the technology existed to make it work, and by
    the time the technology was here, some great things were happening
    with our non-VR consoles. Consoles work because they use existing
    equipment (ie, TVs) or provide inexpensive displays (ie, Gameboy)
    to make gaming cheap and plentiful. I highly doubt you'll see VR
    displays becoming practical for these things, not until the gaming
    public rejects TV displays en masse.


    --

    Aaron "Livin' in the Red Zone" Bossig

    http://www.GodsLabRat.com
    http://www.dvdverdict.com
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