LaserDisc in the digital age

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

In the last couple of days, I've recorded some samples from LaserDisc
to PC.
The results are quite amazing.
I was wondering if any of you have tried this too and what your results
are.

My LaserDisc player is a Pioneer LD-V4300D.
This machine is capable of delivering a raw and unmodified
composite-signal.
This is also documented in the servicemanual.

First I've used some specific Video Essential-testframes, which show
vertical lines in higher and higher frequency. (Last segment of chapter
15)

This is fed into a (Reg.db-tweaked) Hauppauge PVR-350.
(All recordings are made in MPEG-2, 720x480pixels, NTSC, CBR 15000
Kbit/sec.)

All vertical lines show up, even the highest frequencies, without any
herringbone patterns.
Seeing a LaserDisc deliver this kind of resolution is a stunning
surprise.

Recordings made from "Fifth Element" is also an eyecracker.
Crisp and clear picture to a point, that a DVD must be scared.

Later, if time permits, I'll try to have some specific samples made, so
they can be attached to a mail, if anyone is interested in seeing this
for themselves.
Samples will just be cutouts (1-2 seconds long).

Apart from this, what are your experiences in bringing LaserDisc into
the digital age ?

Kindest regards
Brian Hougaard Baldersbæk
8 answers Last reply
More about laserdisc digital age
  1. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

    The specific frames from Video Essentials contain:

    H Frequency Sweep to 5.5 MHz w/1 MHz markers

    Source: http://www.videoessentials.com/VEtestpat.php
  2. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

    tk421 wrote:
    > Other than the problem with brightness, the LD captures looked pretty
    > good.

    That's like saying, "other than the foul stench, the soured milk tasted
    pretty good."

    -Junior
  3. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

    I have a simpler and faster way. I connected my laserdisc player to a Sony
    Digital 8 deck (a deck version of the camcorder) This records the disc to
    digital in real time. Once I have the tape, using an i.LINK, I can go
    digital to digital to my computer or to a DVD recorder. I have tried going
    directly to the DVD recorder, but, I get a much better transfer if I do the
    tape first.


    "[DK6400] Brian Hougaard Baldersbæk" <DK6400Brian@gmail.com> wrote in
    message news:1119732803.638899.248720@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    In the last couple of days, I've recorded some samples from LaserDisc
    to PC.
    The results are quite amazing.
    I was wondering if any of you have tried this too and what your results
    are.

    My LaserDisc player is a Pioneer LD-V4300D.
    This machine is capable of delivering a raw and unmodified
    composite-signal.
    This is also documented in the servicemanual.

    First I've used some specific Video Essential-testframes, which show
    vertical lines in higher and higher frequency. (Last segment of chapter
    15)

    This is fed into a (Reg.db-tweaked) Hauppauge PVR-350.
    (All recordings are made in MPEG-2, 720x480pixels, NTSC, CBR 15000
    Kbit/sec.)

    All vertical lines show up, even the highest frequencies, without any
    herringbone patterns.
    Seeing a LaserDisc deliver this kind of resolution is a stunning
    surprise.

    Recordings made from "Fifth Element" is also an eyecracker.
    Crisp and clear picture to a point, that a DVD must be scared.

    Later, if time permits, I'll try to have some specific samples made, so
    they can be attached to a mail, if anyone is interested in seeing this
    for themselves.
    Samples will just be cutouts (1-2 seconds long).

    Apart from this, what are your experiences in bringing LaserDisc into
    the digital age ?

    Kindest regards
    Brian Hougaard Baldersbæk
  4. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

    I've had mixed results capturing LD from my Pioneer CLD-D703. I use a
    Sony miniDV camcorder as the capture device, which has a pass-thru
    feature so that I don't have to record to tape, I can simply stream to
    computer.

    The main problem I am running into is the captured video is too
    bright. Often it is extremely bright, with whites being burned out so
    that no detail is left. Blacks are a little brighter than they should
    be, but not elevated to the same extent as the whites are. That is
    hard to explain, what I mean is if I edit the video in an NLE and
    simply adjust the brightness down until the whites are correct, then
    the blacks are crushed. So different parts of the picture are
    different levels of overbright at any given time, very hard to correct
    in an NLE.

    I'm not sure why this happens, I asked around and got some replies
    that it was a technical issue with LD output levels or something like
    that. I'm not sure about that, I thought maybe the Sony miniDV
    camcorder might be doing it, however I don't have another capture
    device to try for comparison, so I can't be sure.

    Other than the problem with brightness, the LD captures looked pretty
    good.


    On 25 Jun 2005 13:53:23 -0700, "[DK6400] Brian Hougaard Baldersbæk"
    <DK6400Brian@gmail.com> wrote:

    >In the last couple of days, I've recorded some samples from LaserDisc
    >to PC.
    >The results are quite amazing.
    >I was wondering if any of you have tried this too and what your results
    >are.
    >
    >My LaserDisc player is a Pioneer LD-V4300D.
    >This machine is capable of delivering a raw and unmodified
    >composite-signal.
    >This is also documented in the servicemanual.
    >
    >First I've used some specific Video Essential-testframes, which show
    >vertical lines in higher and higher frequency. (Last segment of chapter
    >15)
    >
    >This is fed into a (Reg.db-tweaked) Hauppauge PVR-350.
    >(All recordings are made in MPEG-2, 720x480pixels, NTSC, CBR 15000
    >Kbit/sec.)
    >
    >All vertical lines show up, even the highest frequencies, without any
    >herringbone patterns.
    >Seeing a LaserDisc deliver this kind of resolution is a stunning
    >surprise.
    >
    >Recordings made from "Fifth Element" is also an eyecracker.
    >Crisp and clear picture to a point, that a DVD must be scared.
    >
    >Later, if time permits, I'll try to have some specific samples made, so
    >they can be attached to a mail, if anyone is interested in seeing this
    >for themselves.
    >Samples will just be cutouts (1-2 seconds long).
    >
    >Apart from this, what are your experiences in bringing LaserDisc into
    >the digital age ?
    >
    >Kindest regards
    >Brian Hougaard Baldersbæk
  5. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

    On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 00:25:53 GMT, tk421 <name@company.com> wrote:

    >I've had mixed results capturing LD from my Pioneer CLD-D703. I use a
    >Sony miniDV camcorder as the capture device, which has a pass-thru
    >feature so that I don't have to record to tape, I can simply stream to
    >computer.
    >
    >The main problem I am running into is the captured video is too
    >bright. Often it is extremely bright, with whites being burned out so
    >that no detail is left. Blacks are a little brighter than they should
    >be, but not elevated to the same extent as the whites are. That is
    >hard to explain, what I mean is if I edit the video in an NLE and
    >simply adjust the brightness down until the whites are correct, then
    >the blacks are crushed. So different parts of the picture are
    >different levels of overbright at any given time, very hard to correct
    >in an NLE.
    >
    >I'm not sure why this happens, I asked around and got some replies
    >that it was a technical issue with LD output levels or something like
    >that. I'm not sure about that, I thought maybe the Sony miniDV
    >camcorder might be doing it, however I don't have another capture
    >device to try for comparison, so I can't be sure.
    >
    >Other than the problem with brightness, the LD captures looked pretty
    >good.
    >

    The sync for laserdisc is compressed, very approx 200 millivolts
    rather than the correct 284-300 millivolts, on a player without TBC.
    The recording device uses the sync tip to pedestal as a reference for
    the overall gain, assuming peak white will be 700 millivolts. (sync
    300, picture 700 = 1 volt, basically speaking.) Since it increases
    the gain based on this incorrect sync size, it puts the whites at some
    800+ millivolts, thus putting it into clipping. For a player without
    TBC I use an external processing amp, or proc amp, to reconstitute
    sync. This should not be an issue with players with TBC, such as the
    D703, however the unit can get out of adjustment, again setting an
    incorrect relationship between sync size and picture information.

    ... Steve .
    >
    >On 25 Jun 2005 13:53:23 -0700, "[DK6400] Brian Hougaard Baldersbæk"
    ><DK6400Brian@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>In the last couple of days, I've recorded some samples from LaserDisc
    >>to PC.
    >>The results are quite amazing.
    >>I was wondering if any of you have tried this too and what your results
    >>are.
    >>
    >>My LaserDisc player is a Pioneer LD-V4300D.
    >>This machine is capable of delivering a raw and unmodified
    >>composite-signal.
    >>This is also documented in the servicemanual.
    >>
    >>First I've used some specific Video Essential-testframes, which show
    >>vertical lines in higher and higher frequency. (Last segment of chapter
    >>15)
    >>
    >>This is fed into a (Reg.db-tweaked) Hauppauge PVR-350.
    >>(All recordings are made in MPEG-2, 720x480pixels, NTSC, CBR 15000
    >>Kbit/sec.)
    >>
    >>All vertical lines show up, even the highest frequencies, without any
    >>herringbone patterns.
    >>Seeing a LaserDisc deliver this kind of resolution is a stunning
    >>surprise.
    >>
    >>Recordings made from "Fifth Element" is also an eyecracker.
    >>Crisp and clear picture to a point, that a DVD must be scared.
    >>
    >>Later, if time permits, I'll try to have some specific samples made, so
    >>they can be attached to a mail, if anyone is interested in seeing this
    >>for themselves.
    >>Samples will just be cutouts (1-2 seconds long).
    >>
    >>Apart from this, what are your experiences in bringing LaserDisc into
    >>the digital age ?
    >>
    >>Kindest regards
    >>Brian Hougaard Baldersbæk
  6. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

    Steve,

    Thanks for the info. I believe it was you that attempted to help me
    out before with the brightness issue, however to be honest I never did
    get a complete understanding of the cause of the problem or how to
    correct it. I don't have a technical background, and am a beginner in
    all things video, so please pardon my ignorance.

    Is there a simple way I can use a Digital Multi Meter to measure the
    sync level that my CLD-D703 is outputting? Or would this require a
    waveform monitor? I'm wondering if I could attach the DMM probes to
    the video output of the D703 while a LD is playing and get some kind
    of meaningful measurement?

    Also, you mentioned the use of a proc amp. I'm wondering if it would
    be useful in my situation to instead use an outboard TBC? If my
    understanding is correct, an external TBC will resync the incoming
    signal and output a correct sync signal. Would an outboard TBC
    adjust the sync to the 284-300 millivolt level and correct the
    brightness problem? Or would it be more appropriate to use only a
    proc amp in this instance?

    Thanks again,
    tk421


    On Mon, 27 Jun 2005 03:02:18 -0400, "Steve(JazzHunter)"
    <jazzhunterNotHere@internet.com> wrote:

    >The sync for laserdisc is compressed, very approx 200 millivolts
    >rather than the correct 284-300 millivolts, on a player without TBC.
    >The recording device uses the sync tip to pedestal as a reference for
    >the overall gain, assuming peak white will be 700 millivolts. (sync
    >300, picture 700 = 1 volt, basically speaking.) Since it increases
    >the gain based on this incorrect sync size, it puts the whites at some
    >800+ millivolts, thus putting it into clipping. For a player without
    >TBC I use an external processing amp, or proc amp, to reconstitute
    >sync. This should not be an issue with players with TBC, such as the
    >D703, however the unit can get out of adjustment, again setting an
    >incorrect relationship between sync size and picture information.
    >
    >.. Steve
  7. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

    Hey, tk421 -- why aren't you at your post?

    Has anyone got a good reference as to where I'd find a decent
    oscilloscope for messing with LD players? I know jack about 'scopes,
    and presumably there's a whole continuum of styles available. I want
    to get one that will do fine, but not one that is way overkill. Got
    some ideas, anyone?
  8. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

    Steve, where would I get my D703 adjusted? Or is it something I
    could do myself? I don't have a waveform monitor but I do have a nice
    Fluke DMM. I'm not afraid to take the cover off the D703 and do some
    tweaking.

    Is there on online reference that you know of for adjusting the D703,
    or perhaps an online copy of the Service Manual? Thanks for you help!

    tk421


    On Mon, 27 Jun 2005 21:06:25 -0400, "Steve(JazzHunter)"
    <jazzhunterNotHere@internet.com> wrote:

    >Yes, as Kurtis says, you need a 'scope of some sort. My D703 also had
    >misadjusted levels. The sync was the correct 284 mv but the sync tip
    >to peak white level was almost 130 IRE, 850+ mv just for the video.
    >So recordings were way overclipped. Also the vertical pedestal to
    >sync pedestal was off. A couple of simple adjustments put things back
    >the way they should be. You have a D703, properly adjusted it is
    >eminently suitable for laserdisc dubbing.
    >
    >.. Steve ..
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