TIVO capabilities

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

These should be easy but I can not find sufficient answers on the net in
general or TIVO web sites. If easier, please refer me to a web site
with the answers.

Program TIVO over the internet. One place on the TIVO website says it
is not possibe, another says it is? Can I and, if so, how?

Update TIVO programming over broadband. How do I do this? Can I do
this over coax to TIVO or do I need it to network to my PC?

TIVO Desktop. I still don't understand what this is. I install it on
my PC but do I use this to access my TIVO unit? If so, what do I gain?

Upgrade my sw to TIVO 4 or 5. Does this refer to TIVO Desktop or do I
upgrade the software on my TIVO unit?
18 answers Last reply
More about tivo capabilities
  1. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    A lot of what you ask depends on the type of Tivo DVR you have, which
    you did not specify:

    > Program TIVO over the internet. One place on the TIVO website says it
    > is not possibe, another says it is? Can I and, if so, how?

    Yes, it's very easy w/ Series 2 standalone Tivos:

    http://customersupport.tivo.com/knowbase/root/public/tv2056.htm?

    Note that broadband conneccted Tivos update much more frequently than
    phone-connected ones.

    >
    > Update TIVO programming over broadband. How do I do this? Can I do
    > this over coax to TIVO or do I need it to network to my PC?

    Yes (for standalone series 2 Tivos), but not over coax, you must network
    it with a compatible adapter (it must connect to your home network, not
    necessarily your computer):

    http://customersupport.tivo.com/knowbase/root/public/tv2006.htm?

    Wired connections:

    http://customersupport.tivo.com/knowbase/root/public/tv2009.htm?

    Wireless connections:

    http://customersupport.tivo.com/knowbase/root/public/tv2008.htm?

    Directivos already get their programming over satellite.

    >
    > TIVO Desktop. I still don't understand what this is. I install it on
    > my PC but do I use this to access my TIVO unit? If so, what do I gain?

    See http://www.tivo.com/4.9.4.1.asp

    Basically you get access to music and photos on your computer from your
    Tivo, plus Tivo-to-go which allows you to download movies from your Tivo
    to your computer. Be sure to check out the JavaHMO extension (3rd party
    software).

    > Upgrade my sw to TIVO 4 or 5. Does this refer to TIVO Desktop or do I
    > upgrade the software on my TIVO unit?

    Standalone series 2 DVR's should be automatically updated to SW version
    7. If you have another type of Tivo your options will be different.
    Post with exactly what you have and we can give you better info.

    Randy S.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    Old Guy wrote:
    > These should be easy but I can not find sufficient answers on the net in
    > general or TIVO web sites. If easier, please refer me to a web site
    > with the answers.
    >
    > Program TIVO over the internet. One place on the TIVO website says it
    > is not possibe, another says it is? Can I and, if so, how?

    You can log in to TiVo.com and select from an online program guide to
    *request* new recordings on your TiVo. You cannot see if there are
    conflicts, etc., but your TiVo will notify you via email if it was able
    (or unable) to schedule your request. That is the extent of programming
    possible on an unmodified TiVo.

    > Update TIVO programming over broadband. How do I do this? Can I do
    > this over coax to TIVO or do I need it to network to my PC?

    You connect TiVo to your network using a USB-Ethernet adapter (TiVo.com
    lists compatible wired or wireless USB adapters).

    > TIVO Desktop. I still don't understand what this is. I install it on
    > my PC but do I use this to access my TIVO unit? If so, what do I gain?

    TiVo Desktop allows you to transfer shows from your TiVo to a local PC
    hard drive for later / mobile viewing, synching to a compatible mobile
    device or burning to DVD. At this time, you cannot tranfer shows *back*
    to the TiVo, so it does not lend itself to supplemental storage uses,
    but it is particularly nice for laptop users who travel: they can take
    their favorite programs with them and watch them on the road. You can
    also publish specific music or photo directories on a host PC and listen
    to / watch them thru your TiVo.

    > Upgrade my sw to TIVO 4 or 5. Does this refer to TIVO Desktop or do I
    > upgrade the software on my TIVO unit?

    Software upgrades are managed by the TiVo service. You will get the
    latest upgrades when you connect to the TiVo service for the first time.
    Without substantial hacking, you cannot control the upgrade schedule.

    - John
  3. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    Randy S. wrote:
    > Old Guy asked:
    >>
    >> Update TIVO programming over broadband. How do I do this? Can I do
    >> this over coax to TIVO or do I need it to network to my PC?
    >
    > Yes (for standalone series 2 Tivos), but not over coax, you must network
    > it with a compatible adapter (it must connect to your home network, not
    > necessarily your computer):
    >
    > http://customersupport.tivo.com/knowbase/root/public/tv2009.htm?

    Note: If you have a PC connected directly to a cable modem, you will
    need to buy a network hub or a cable-modem/DSL firewall router, so
    that there will be a place where your TiVo can plug in to.
    -Joe
  4. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    John wrote:
    > Old Guy wrote:
    >
    >> These should be easy but I can not find sufficient answers on the net
    >> in general or TIVO web sites. If easier, please refer me to a web
    >> site with the answers.
    >>
    >> Program TIVO over the internet. One place on the TIVO website says it
    >> is not possibe, another says it is? Can I and, if so, how?
    >
    >
    > You can log in to TiVo.com and select from an online program guide to
    > *request* new recordings on your TiVo. You cannot see if there are
    > conflicts, etc., but your TiVo will notify you via email if it was able
    > (or unable) to schedule your request. That is the extent of programming
    > possible on an unmodified TiVo.
    >
    >> Update TIVO programming over broadband. How do I do this? Can I do
    >> this over coax to TIVO or do I need it to network to my PC?
    >
    >
    > You connect TiVo to your network using a USB-Ethernet adapter (TiVo.com
    > lists compatible wired or wireless USB adapters).
    >
    >> TIVO Desktop. I still don't understand what this is. I install it on
    >> my PC but do I use this to access my TIVO unit? If so, what do I gain?
    >
    >
    > TiVo Desktop allows you to transfer shows from your TiVo to a local PC
    > hard drive for later / mobile viewing, synching to a compatible mobile
    > device or burning to DVD. At this time, you cannot tranfer shows *back*
    > to the TiVo, so it does not lend itself to supplemental storage uses,
    > but it is particularly nice for laptop users who travel: they can take
    > their favorite programs with them and watch them on the road. You can
    > also publish specific music or photo directories on a host PC and listen
    > to / watch them thru your TiVo.
    >
    >> Upgrade my sw to TIVO 4 or 5. Does this refer to TIVO Desktop or do I
    >> upgrade the software on my TIVO unit?
    >
    >
    > Software upgrades are managed by the TiVo service. You will get the
    > latest upgrades when you connect to the TiVo service for the first time.
    > Without substantial hacking, you cannot control the upgrade schedule.
    >
    > - John

    Thanks for the responses from all.
    Easy followups.
    Connecting TIVO to a network. I already have a wireless network but
    signal strength is poor where the TIVO is. Can I hard-wire TIVO t oa
    wireless adapter? (I have 3 unused LAN ports.)
    I note in some research on the net I connect TIVO to a network by
    Ethernet. Hate to seem hopelessly ignorant, but I have 3 possible phone
    lines (if that is the terminology) in the one phone wires in my house.
    Can I connect Ethernet jacks to, say, line 3, or does Ethernet require
    special wiring?
  5. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    > Thanks for the responses from all.
    > Easy followups.
    > Connecting TIVO to a network. I already have a wireless network but
    > signal strength is poor where the TIVO is. Can I hard-wire TIVO t oa
    > wireless adapter? (I have 3 unused LAN ports.)

    Well, hardwiring a wireless connection is a bit of an oxymoron. I think
    you mean can you hardwire the Tivo to a LAN port, which the answer to is
    yes. My original post has links for connecting via a wired connection.
    You just need to use a usb-to-ethernet connector rather than a
    usb-to-wireless connector.

    > I note in some research on the net I connect TIVO to a network by
    > Ethernet. Hate to seem hopelessly ignorant, but I have 3 possible phone
    > lines (if that is the terminology) in the one phone wires in my house.
    > Can I connect Ethernet jacks to, say, line 3, or does Ethernet require
    > special wiring?

    Fast Ethernet (100 Mpbs over copper) requires Category 5 network wire
    (or better, cat. 5e or cat. 6 work also). Most phone wire is category 3
    or worse. In many newer homes (like, say, built within the last 2-3
    years) they are using Cat. 5 or better for *all* non-electrical wiring,
    since it's cheap. But that's not necessarily the norm, building
    construction practices change very slowly. But even if you have Cat. 5
    in your walls, you can't "split" a single cable, Ethernet requires a
    dedicated cable (it uses more than a single pair).

    Randy S.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    > Fast Ethernet (100 Mpbs over copper) requires Category 5 network wire
    > (or better, cat. 5e or cat. 6 work also). Most phone wire is category 3
    > or worse. In many newer homes (like, say, built within the last 2-3
    > years) they are using Cat. 5 or better for *all* non-electrical wiring,
    > since it's cheap. But that's not necessarily the norm, building
    > construction practices change very slowly. But even if you have Cat. 5
    > in your walls, you can't "split" a single cable, Ethernet requires a
    > dedicated cable (it uses more than a single pair).
    >
    > Randy S.

    Actually, I should mention that there are phone line networking devices.
    They will limit your speed somewhat, but if you have no other options,
    they will work.

    Randy S.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    Randy S. wrote:
    >
    >> Fast Ethernet (100 Mpbs over copper) requires Category 5 network wire
    >> (or better, cat. 5e or cat. 6 work also). Most phone wire is category
    >> 3 or worse. In many newer homes (like, say, built within the last 2-3
    >> years) they are using Cat. 5 or better for *all* non-electrical
    >> wiring, since it's cheap. But that's not necessarily the norm,
    >> building construction practices change very slowly. But even if you
    >> have Cat. 5 in your walls, you can't "split" a single cable, Ethernet
    >> requires a dedicated cable (it uses more than a single pair).
    >>
    >> Randy S.
    >
    >
    > Actually, I should mention that there are phone line networking devices.
    > They will limit your speed somewhat, but if you have no other options,
    > they will work.
    >
    > Randy S.

    Well, my phone lines were replaced last year. How do I tell if they're
    Cat-5? And where do I learn about phone line networking devices. For
    TIVO use, speed is a minor concern.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    Old Guy wrote:
    > Randy S. wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>> Fast Ethernet (100 Mpbs over copper) requires Category 5 network wire
    >>> (or better, cat. 5e or cat. 6 work also). Most phone wire is
    >>> category 3 or worse. In many newer homes (like, say, built within
    >>> the last 2-3 years) they are using Cat. 5 or better for *all*
    >>> non-electrical wiring, since it's cheap. But that's not necessarily
    >>> the norm, building construction practices change very slowly. But
    >>> even if you have Cat. 5 in your walls, you can't "split" a single
    >>> cable, Ethernet requires a dedicated cable (it uses more than a
    >>> single pair).
    >>>
    >>> Randy S.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Actually, I should mention that there are phone line networking
    >> devices. They will limit your speed somewhat, but if you have no
    >> other options, they will work.
    >>
    >> Randy S.
    >
    >
    > Well, my phone lines were replaced last year. How do I tell if they're
    > Cat-5? And where do I learn about phone line networking devices. For
    > TIVO use, speed is a minor concern.

    You'd have to pull out the cable from the wall some and look for
    markings on it. It would have to be round, with 8 wires (4 pairs) in
    it). But it's highly unlikely you could use it for networking purposes
    unless you had an entire spare cable pulled to that spot, and that your
    cables are all home run back to a central point (as opposed to being run
    in series from outlet to outlet).

    There are lots of phoneline networking kits, you can check here to start:

    http://www.netronixinc.com/product_others.htm

    Phoneline networking really hasn't caught on all that much.

    Randy S.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    Randy S. wrote:
    > Old Guy wrote:
    >
    >> Randy S. wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>> Fast Ethernet (100 Mpbs over copper) requires Category 5 network
    >>>> wire (or better, cat. 5e or cat. 6 work also). Most phone wire is
    >>>> category 3 or worse. In many newer homes (like, say, built within
    >>>> the last 2-3 years) they are using Cat. 5 or better for *all*
    >>>> non-electrical wiring, since it's cheap. But that's not necessarily
    >>>> the norm, building construction practices change very slowly. But
    >>>> even if you have Cat. 5 in your walls, you can't "split" a single
    >>>> cable, Ethernet requires a dedicated cable (it uses more than a
    >>>> single pair).
    >>>>
    >>>> Randy S.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Actually, I should mention that there are phone line networking
    >>> devices. They will limit your speed somewhat, but if you have no
    >>> other options, they will work.
    >>>
    >>> Randy S.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Well, my phone lines were replaced last year. How do I tell if
    >> they're Cat-5? And where do I learn about phone line networking
    >> devices. For TIVO use, speed is a minor concern.
    >
    >
    > You'd have to pull out the cable from the wall some and look for
    > markings on it. It would have to be round, with 8 wires (4 pairs) in
    > it). But it's highly unlikely you could use it for networking purposes
    > unless you had an entire spare cable pulled to that spot, and that your
    > cables are all home run back to a central point (as opposed to being run
    > in series from outlet to outlet).
    >
    > There are lots of phoneline networking kits, you can check here to start:
    >
    > http://www.netronixinc.com/product_others.htm
    >
    > Phoneline networking really hasn't caught on all that much.
    >
    > Randy S.
    Well, I have Cat-5 - 4 pairs. And I have the home runs. But, I only
    have one cable - using it for line 1 (regular voice). Thanks for the help.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    >
    > Well, I have Cat-5 - 4 pairs. And I have the home runs. But, I only
    > have one cable - using it for line 1 (regular voice). Thanks for the help.

    Well, you're close. You could use the existing cable to pull another
    cable through if you're comfortable pulling cable. That's probably your
    best long term solution, but it would involve crawling around in your
    attic, and I'd imagine it was pretty hot up there right now.

    Also, be aware that just having 4 pairs doesn't make it cat 5, if that's
    the only thing you're basing your assessment on. All Cat 5 cable has 4
    pairs, but not all cables that have 4 pairs are cat 5! In fact, I think
    even cat 3 has 4 pairs as well. You need to see the markings on the
    outer sheath.

    Randy S.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    On 2005-06-20, Old Guy <jay.lunis@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Randy S. wrote:
    >> Old Guy wrote:
    >>
    >>> Randy S. wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Fast Ethernet (100 Mpbs over copper) requires Category 5 network
    >>>>> wire (or better, cat. 5e or cat. 6 work also). Most phone wire is
    >>>>> category 3 or worse. In many newer homes (like, say, built within
    >>>>> the last 2-3 years) they are using Cat. 5 or better for *all*
    >>>>> non-electrical wiring, since it's cheap. But that's not necessarily
    >>>>> the norm, building construction practices change very slowly. But
    >>>>> even if you have Cat. 5 in your walls, you can't "split" a single
    >>>>> cable, Ethernet requires a dedicated cable (it uses more than a
    >>>>> single pair).
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Randy S.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Actually, I should mention that there are phone line networking
    >>>> devices. They will limit your speed somewhat, but if you have no
    >>>> other options, they will work.
    >>>>
    >>>> Randy S.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Well, my phone lines were replaced last year. How do I tell if
    >>> they're Cat-5? And where do I learn about phone line networking
    >>> devices. For TIVO use, speed is a minor concern.
    >>
    >>
    >> You'd have to pull out the cable from the wall some and look for
    >> markings on it. It would have to be round, with 8 wires (4 pairs) in
    >> it). But it's highly unlikely you could use it for networking purposes
    >> unless you had an entire spare cable pulled to that spot, and that your
    >> cables are all home run back to a central point (as opposed to being run
    >> in series from outlet to outlet).
    >>
    >> There are lots of phoneline networking kits, you can check here to start:
    >>
    >> http://www.netronixinc.com/product_others.htm
    >>
    >> Phoneline networking really hasn't caught on all that much.
    >>
    >> Randy S.
    > Well, I have Cat-5 - 4 pairs. And I have the home runs. But, I only
    > have one cable - using it for line 1 (regular voice). Thanks for the help.

    Perfect. You should be able to convert it to do both voice and networking
    then.

    --
    This is my .sig
  12. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    >>Well, I have Cat-5 - 4 pairs. And I have the home runs. But, I only
    >>have one cable - using it for line 1 (regular voice). Thanks for the help.
    >
    >
    > Perfect. You should be able to convert it to do both voice and networking
    > then.
    >

    Is there a way to do that within spec? I'd be afraid to wire 2 pair for
    100 Mbps ethernet and use 1 of the unused pairs for a voice line. You'd
    be risking cross-talk and data loss. A long time ago, I used to piggy
    back 2-10 Mbps ethernet lines on one cable for emergency use only, but I
    don't think fast ethernet is as forgiving.

    Randy S.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    On 2005-06-20, Randy S. <rswitt@nospamgmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>>Well, I have Cat-5 - 4 pairs. And I have the home runs. But, I only
    >>>have one cable - using it for line 1 (regular voice). Thanks for the help.
    >>
    >>
    >> Perfect. You should be able to convert it to do both voice and networking
    >> then.
    >>
    >
    > Is there a way to do that within spec?

    Yes, the spec had this very concept in mind when it was written.

    > I'd be afraid to wire 2 pair for
    > 100 Mbps ethernet and use 1 of the unused pairs for a voice line. You'd
    > be risking cross-talk and data loss.

    There isn't any concern about cross-talk or data loss when comparing
    digital network and analog voice on parallel lines. The only thing that
    may even impact it is the voltage from a ring and that has been
    demonstrated to not cause issues, hence a safe spec. Just make sure you
    don't split your pairs.

    > A long time ago, I used to piggy
    > back 2-10 Mbps ethernet lines on one cable for emergency use only, but I
    > don't think fast ethernet is as forgiving.

    You're not supposed to use the same pair for voice and network. He has 4
    pairs. 1 pair for voice leaving 3 pair. A 100mbps line only needs two
    pair. So, he would have an extra pair lying around which could be used
    for a second phone line. This is how my house is wired - two voice and 1
    100mbps network all in the same Cat5e cable.

    Now, it is true he can't do 1000mbps as that requires all 4 pair, but
    doing the above will work perfectly and not cause any problems (assuming
    all the pairs are terminated correctly and the wiring really is home-run,
    etc.)

    --
    This is my .sig
  14. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    >>>Perfect. You should be able to convert it to do both voice and networking
    >>>then.
    >>>
    >>
    >>Is there a way to do that within spec?
    >
    >
    > Yes, the spec had this very concept in mind when it was written.

    Really? I've never seen a reference to that. I've been wiring and
    designing networks for more than a few years and it's always been
    drilled into me *not* to split cables. I've done it, but I've accepted
    that I was violating specs. I fully admit I don't know the specs by
    heart, and this may be an area I have never encountered, but it really
    seems unlikely to me. The wiring diagrams that are so common (at
    http://www.kataan.org/techref/eiatia.html for example) always show all 4
    pairs being terminated, even though we both know only 2 pair are
    actively used.

    I do want to emphasize that I'm *not* saying it might not work just fine
    (though I'd think you would definitely be giving up some reliability),
    just that it violates specs.

    >
    >
    >> I'd be afraid to wire 2 pair for
    >>100 Mbps ethernet and use 1 of the unused pairs for a voice line. You'd
    >>be risking cross-talk and data loss.
    >
    >
    > There isn't any concern about cross-talk or data loss when comparing
    > digital network and analog voice on parallel lines. The only thing that
    > may even impact it is the voltage from a ring and that has been
    > demonstrated to not cause issues, hence a safe spec. Just make sure you
    > don't split your pairs.

    Why would cross-talk not be an issue? It seems to me that any EM source
    can cause cross-talk, including analog voice signals. Is it just that
    it's negligible? It definitely makes sense not to split the pairs,
    though, the twist in the pairs eliminates a lot of the potential
    interference.

    >
    >
    >> A long time ago, I used to piggy
    >>back 2-10 Mbps ethernet lines on one cable for emergency use only, but I
    >>don't think fast ethernet is as forgiving.
    >
    >
    > You're not supposed to use the same pair for voice and network. He has 4
    > pairs. 1 pair for voice leaving 3 pair. A 100mbps line only needs two
    > pair. So, he would have an extra pair lying around which could be used
    > for a second phone line. This is how my house is wired - two voice and 1
    > 100mbps network all in the same Cat5e cable.
    >
    > Now, it is true he can't do 1000mbps as that requires all 4 pair, but
    > doing the above will work perfectly and not cause any problems (assuming
    > all the pairs are terminated correctly and the wiring really is home-run,
    > etc.)

    I agree with you technically, I'm just not sure it would still be within
    specs and that it might cause some long-term unreliability.

    Randy S.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    On 2005-06-20, Randy S. <rswittNO@SPAMgmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > I do want to emphasize that I'm *not* saying it might not work just fine
    > (though I'd think you would definitely be giving up some reliability),

    Nope - no reliability given up.

    > Why would cross-talk not be an issue? It seems to me that any EM source
    > can cause cross-talk, including analog voice signals. Is it just that
    > it's negligible? It definitely makes sense not to split the pairs,
    > though, the twist in the pairs eliminates a lot of the potential
    > interference.

    Not only is it negligible, but the cross-talk impacts both lines in the
    pair and so it ends up getting canceled out. That is why it's so
    important to not split the pairs.

    > I agree with you technically, I'm just not sure it would still be within
    > specs and that it might cause some long-term unreliability.

    Any unreliability would be the same short-term vs long-term but in this
    case, there isn't a reliability issue.

    This topic comes up from time to time on comp.dcom.cabling and you'll
    always have people who say it's bad form to use 1 cable for mutliple uses
    (and that's probably accurate) but from a technical stand-point, it's
    perfectly fine running 1-2 voice lines in the same cat5 cable as two-pairs
    for a 100mbps network line.

    --
    This is my .sig
  16. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    > This topic comes up from time to time on comp.dcom.cabling and you'll
    > always have people who say it's bad form to use 1 cable for mutliple uses
    > (and that's probably accurate) but from a technical stand-point, it's
    > perfectly fine running 1-2 voice lines in the same cat5 cable as two-pairs
    > for a 100mbps network line.
    >

    Well, I can accept that. I can tell you that you won't see it happening
    where I work though ;-).

    Randy S.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    >> I do want to emphasize that I'm *not* saying it might not work just fine
    >> (though I'd think you would definitely be giving up some reliability),
    >
    >Nope - no reliability given up.

    I'm not sure you can be sure of *NO* reliability given up, but the
    difference is negligible. How much reliability do you give up if
    you double the chance of the cable being taken out by an asteroid
    hitting Earth? It's not zero but it's pretty darn close.

    >> Why would cross-talk not be an issue? It seems to me that any EM source
    >> can cause cross-talk, including analog voice signals. Is it just that

    Consider the frequency of the signals involved. Analog voice signals
    are typically 400Hz - 4KHz. 100Mbit ethernet is much closer to
    100MHz. It's a lot easier to reject interference if it is at a
    significantly different frequency from the signal.

    Consider the problem of power running in cables parallel to this
    one for a long distance. Pervasive power line hum is 60Hz or 50Hz
    in most parts of the world, and at much higher signal levels
    than an analog line.

    You might have a worse problem with low-frequency components (you
    might, for example, have 2,000 packets/second going through the
    cable) of the ethernet signal causing cross-talk in the analog
    signal. Pair twisting and the frequency separation help reduce
    this to a low level.


    >> it's negligible? It definitely makes sense not to split the pairs,
    >> though, the twist in the pairs eliminates a lot of the potential
    >> interference.
    >
    >Not only is it negligible, but the cross-talk impacts both lines in the
    >pair and so it ends up getting canceled out.

    Approximately. Twisting the pairs does not do perfect cancellation,
    especially near the ends when they go to a connector.

    >That is why it's so
    >important to not split the pairs.
    >
    >> I agree with you technically, I'm just not sure it would still be within
    >> specs and that it might cause some long-term unreliability.
    >
    >Any unreliability would be the same short-term vs long-term but in this
    >case, there isn't a reliability issue.
    >
    >This topic comes up from time to time on comp.dcom.cabling and you'll
    >always have people who say it's bad form to use 1 cable for mutliple uses
    >(and that's probably accurate) but from a technical stand-point, it's
    >perfectly fine running 1-2 voice lines in the same cat5 cable as two-pairs
    >for a 100mbps network line.

    Gordon L. Burditt
  18. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    Randy S. wrote:

    >> There isn't any concern about cross-talk or data loss when comparing
    >> digital network and analog voice on parallel lines. The only thing that
    >> may even impact it is the voltage from a ring and that has been
    >> demonstrated to not cause issues, hence a safe spec. Just make sure you
    >> don't split your pairs.
    >
    > Why would cross-talk not be an issue? It seems to me that any EM source
    > can cause cross-talk, including analog voice signals.

    The bandwidths are completely different and widely separated.

    The ethernet signals, which run in the 10 MHz to 2 GHz range, have no
    affect on analog voice circuits.

    The voice signals, which span 20 Hz to 4 KHz, have no affect on
    ethernet transceivers.

    -Joe
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