FS: Large collection of RCA Videodiscs (CED) Movies

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

For sale: Large (200 plus) collection of RCA videodisc movies. Titles
include classic movies from the 70's, along with some from the 60's as
well as early to mid-80's titles. Collection also includes a good
selection of concert titles, mainly consisting of rock acts. A few of
the rarer discs that come to mind is The Beatles "Let It Be" and "Back
To The Future", which I believe was one of the last CED discs to be
produced.

This is a great chance to pickup a instant movie collection, no more
late night trips to Blockbuster for awhile! Most of the titles are
classics as a videophile helped me pick out the titles from a larger
collection. I would be willing to sell the whole collection for $.50
per disc. I am in the Portland, OR. metro area and can arrange
shipping but local pickup would be prefered.

Please contact me if interested.


thanks
LP
17 answers Last reply
More about large collection rca videodiscs ced movies
  1. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    "Cartrivision1" <doidy1@juno.com> wrote in message
    news:1115891524.490844.70450@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > For sale: Large (200 plus) collection of RCA videodisc movies. Titles
    > include classic movies from the 70's, along with some from the 60's as
    > well as early to mid-80's titles. Collection also includes a good
    > selection of concert titles, mainly consisting of rock acts. A few of
    > the rarer discs that come to mind is The Beatles "Let It Be" and "Back
    > To The Future", which I believe was one of the last CED discs to be
    > produced.
    >
    > This is a great chance to pickup a instant movie collection, no more
    > late night trips to Blockbuster for awhile! Most of the titles are
    > classics as a videophile helped me pick out the titles from a larger
    > collection. I would be willing to sell the whole collection for $.50
    > per disc. I am in the Portland, OR. metro area and can arrange
    > shipping but local pickup would be prefered.
    >
    > Please contact me if interested.
    >
    >
    > thanks
    > LP


    > which I believe was one of the last CED discs to be
    >produced.
    There is a good reason for this; MUCH better technology in other systems
    (laserdisc).


    --
  2. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    In article <1186slmrnas6l27@corp.supernews.com>, _ <-@-.com> wrote:

    >"Cartrivision1" <doidy1@juno.com> wrote in message
    >news:1115891524.490844.70450@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >> For sale: Large (200 plus) collection of RCA videodisc movies. Titles
    >> include classic movies from the 70's, along with some from the 60's as
    >> well as early to mid-80's titles. Collection also includes a good
    >> selection of concert titles, mainly consisting of rock acts. A few of
    >> the rarer discs that come to mind is The Beatles "Let It Be" and "Back
    >> To The Future", which I believe was one of the last CED discs to be
    >> produced.
    >>
    >> This is a great chance to pickup a instant movie collection, no more
    >> late night trips to Blockbuster for awhile! Most of the titles are
    >> classics as a videophile helped me pick out the titles from a larger
    >> collection. I would be willing to sell the whole collection for $.50
    >> per disc. I am in the Portland, OR. metro area and can arrange
    >> shipping but local pickup would be prefered.
    >>
    >> Please contact me if interested.

    >> which I believe was one of the last CED discs to be
    >>produced.

    >There is a good reason for this; MUCH better technology in other systems
    >(laserdisc).

    The other reason was the RCA had a revolving door for the CEO's to
    go in and out. I forget the names now, but one comes in an junks
    the RCA VCR development and says 'buy a VHS system and have it on
    the market by Christmas'.

    Next CEO comes in and says VHS costs too much [they were about
    $700+ then] and pushes the CED.

    Next CEO comes in and junks the CED - right after CBS announced
    they were jumping on the CED bandwagon - which at that time had a
    larger catalog than laser.

    RCA was a truly screwed up company.

    "Much Better Technology" seldom wins in the consumer market place.

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
  3. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    On Sat, 14 May 2005 04:25:01 GMT, Bill Vermillion <bv@wjv.com> wrote:


    >In article <1186slmrnas6l27@corp.supernews.com>, _ <-@-.com> wrote:

    >>"Cartrivision1" <doidy1@juno.com> wrote in message
    >>news:1115891524.490844.70450@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >>> For sale: Large (200 plus) collection of RCA videodisc movies. Titles
    >>> include classic movies from the 70's, along with some from the 60's as
    >>> well as early to mid-80's titles. Collection also includes a good
    >>> selection of concert titles, mainly consisting of rock acts. A few of
    >>> the rarer discs that come to mind is The Beatles "Let It Be" and "Back
    >>> To The Future", which I believe was one of the last CED discs to be
    >>> produced.
    >>>
    >>> This is a great chance to pickup a instant movie collection, no more
    >>> late night trips to Blockbuster for awhile! Most of the titles are
    >>> classics as a videophile helped me pick out the titles from a larger
    >>> collection. I would be willing to sell the whole collection for $.50
    >>> per disc. I am in the Portland, OR. metro area and can arrange
    >>> shipping but local pickup would be prefered.
    >>>
    >>> Please contact me if interested.

    >>> which I believe was one of the last CED discs to be
    >>>produced.

    >>There is a good reason for this; MUCH better technology in other systems
    >>(laserdisc).

    >The other reason was the RCA had a revolving door for the CEO's to
    >go in and out. I forget the names now, but one comes in an junks
    >the RCA VCR development and says 'buy a VHS system and have it on
    >the market by Christmas'.

    >Next CEO comes in and says VHS costs too much [they were about
    >$700+ then] and pushes the CED.

    >Next CEO comes in and junks the CED - right after CBS announced
    >they were jumping on the CED bandwagon - which at that time had a
    >larger catalog than laser.

    >RCA was a truly screwed up company.

    >"Much Better Technology" seldom wins in the consumer market place.

    It did this time.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    The LAST CED produced was Diseny's Pinochio, and RCA had to fire up a
    pressing plant back into production for that one. In Indianapolis, I
    believe. Also..the formats demise had more to do with Tax Breaks as opposed
    to marketplace.

    CED was the FIRST format to offer titles right after theatrical runs. War
    Games and Octopussy hitting that format MONTHS before videotape. I was in
    the business renting these and Laser and my customers thought I didn't order
    those titles, and a couple of others, just to promote the format. At the
    time I rented CED/Laser/Beta/VHS.
    CED also had the first run of Letterboxed titles including Manhattan and
    some Elliot Gould detective movie I can not recall the title of right now.

    BTW..I have HUNDREDS of discs..many unopened as well as 2 of the SJT/SKT-400
    players and the 4 interactive titles that went with them.

    "AZ Nomad" <aznomad@PmunOgeBOX.com> wrote in message
    news:slrnd8cv76.au5.aznomad@ip70-176-155-130.ph.ph.cox.net...
    > On Sat, 14 May 2005 04:25:01 GMT, Bill Vermillion <bv@wjv.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In article <1186slmrnas6l27@corp.supernews.com>, _ <-@-.com> wrote:
    >
    >>>"Cartrivision1" <doidy1@juno.com> wrote in message
    >>>news:1115891524.490844.70450@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >>>> For sale: Large (200 plus) collection of RCA videodisc movies. Titles
    >>>> include classic movies from the 70's, along with some from the 60's as
    >>>> well as early to mid-80's titles. Collection also includes a good
    >>>> selection of concert titles, mainly consisting of rock acts. A few of
    >>>> the rarer discs that come to mind is The Beatles "Let It Be" and "Back
    >>>> To The Future", which I believe was one of the last CED discs to be
    >>>> produced.
    >>>>
    >>>> This is a great chance to pickup a instant movie collection, no more
    >>>> late night trips to Blockbuster for awhile! Most of the titles are
    >>>> classics as a videophile helped me pick out the titles from a larger
    >>>> collection. I would be willing to sell the whole collection for $.50
    >>>> per disc. I am in the Portland, OR. metro area and can arrange
    >>>> shipping but local pickup would be prefered.
    >>>>
    >>>> Please contact me if interested.
    >
    >>>> which I believe was one of the last CED discs to be
    >>>>produced.
    >
    >>>There is a good reason for this; MUCH better technology in other systems
    >>>(laserdisc).
    >
    >>The other reason was the RCA had a revolving door for the CEO's to
    >>go in and out. I forget the names now, but one comes in an junks
    >>the RCA VCR development and says 'buy a VHS system and have it on
    >>the market by Christmas'.
    >
    >>Next CEO comes in and says VHS costs too much [they were about
    >>$700+ then] and pushes the CED.
    >
    >>Next CEO comes in and junks the CED - right after CBS announced
    >>they were jumping on the CED bandwagon - which at that time had a
    >>larger catalog than laser.
    >
    >>RCA was a truly screwed up company.
    >
    >>"Much Better Technology" seldom wins in the consumer market place.
    >
    > It did this time.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    "NJM1" <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:5NGhe.1922$_f7.124@trndny01...
    > The LAST CED produced was Diseny's Pinochio, and RCA had to fire up a
    > pressing plant back into production for that one. In Indianapolis, I
    > believe. Also..the formats demise had more to do with Tax Breaks as
    opposed
    > to marketplace.

    I did not know.


    > CED was the FIRST format to offer titles right after theatrical runs. War
    > Games and Octopussy hitting that format MONTHS before videotape. I was in
    > the business renting these and Laser and my customers thought I didn't
    order
    > those titles, and a couple of others, just to promote the format. At the
    > time I rented CED/Laser/Beta/VHS.

    Yep, those were the days.


    > BTW..I have HUNDREDS of discs..many unopened as well as 2 of the
    SJT/SKT-400
    > players and the 4 interactive titles that went with them.

    WOW! Those aught to be worth about 25¢ each by now?
  6. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    On Sun, 15 May 2005 11:55:45 +0000, NJM1 wrote:

    > The LAST CED produced was Diseny's Pinochio, and RCA had to fire up a
    > pressing plant back into production for that one. In Indianapolis, I
    > believe. Also..the formats demise had more to do with Tax Breaks as opposed
    > to marketplace.

    And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically designed so that
    it *will* wear out with repeated plays.

    For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    >
    > And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically designed so that
    > it *will* wear out with repeated plays.
    >
    > For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.
    >
    To the contrary, it was a highly specilaized vinyl to inhibit static
    electricity. And the more you played the discs, the better they actually
    looked. As the stylus worn down the special coating on the discs, it gave a
    more accurate rendering of the pressing, as wel as make the notorious
    "skips" go away.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    In article <pan.2005.05.15.16.28.37.212993@spamblocked.com>,
    Morely Dotes <morelydotes@spamblocked.com> wrote:
    >On Sun, 15 May 2005 11:55:45 +0000, NJM1 wrote:
    >
    >> The LAST CED produced was Diseny's Pinochio, and RCA had to fire up a
    >> pressing plant back into production for that one. In Indianapolis, I
    >> believe. Also..the formats demise had more to do with Tax Breaks as opposed
    >> to marketplace.

    >And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically
    >designed so that it *will* wear out with repeated plays.

    Bull-pucky.

    A CED is vinyl - and it was designed to be pressed in places
    that could press LPs. However LP pressing plants were not clean
    enough to make good CEDs. [I've been in them and with all the
    carbon black used in the plastic some seem as dirty as a coal
    mine].

    As to wearing out, they were NOT like a phonograph. The grooves
    were there to move the tangential tracking tone arm - a really
    cheap way to avoid putting in tracking servos such as in the
    VHD video disks. What wore out were the stylii. They rode in the
    groove and tracked the capacitance below the groove.
    Theoretically good for at least 1000 plays. But I've yet to see
    anything I'd watch that much.

    >For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.

    LD never reached a critical consumer mass - it just was loved by
    all of us who collected great/rare films - and so many have yet to
    make it to DVD. I own both CEDs and LDs.

    Bill


    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
  9. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    In article <5NGhe.1922$_f7.124@trndny01>, NJM1
    <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:

    >The LAST CED produced was Diseny's Pinochio, and RCA had to
    >fire up a pressing plant back into production for that one. In
    >Indianapolis, I believe. Also..the formats demise had more to do
    >with Tax Breaks as opposed to marketplace.

    >CED was the FIRST format to offer titles right after theatrical
    >runs. War Games and Octopussy hitting that format MONTHS before
    >videotape. I was in the business renting these and Laser and
    >my customers thought I didn't order those titles, and a couple
    >of others, just to promote the format. At the time I rented
    >CED/Laser/Beta/VHS. CED also had the first run of Letterboxed
    >titles including Manhattan and some Elliot Gould detective movie
    >I can not recall the title of right now.

    >BTW..I have HUNDREDS of discs..many unopened as well as 2 of the
    >SJT/SKT-400 players and the 4 interactive titles that went with
    >them.

    If RCA had released the 400 series at first instead of the abortive
    model 100 and model 90 [with that stupid lever that kids were
    breaking in the demo machines in stores] they might have had a much
    better accpetance.

    The direct drive turntable in the 400s made a much better looking
    picture than the belt drive units in all that went before.

    If you played the 400s next to the belt driven models you could
    see the weave/motion in the cheaper models. But many people don't
    notice the movement in pictures in home media. Seeing a VHS
    through a TBC as compared to standard playback is surprising. You
    just aren't used to seeing rock-steady pictures.

    While the 400's weren't quite at that level, they were close.

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
  10. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    In article <uj0ie.5119$_f7.1337@trndny01>,
    "NJM1" <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:

    > >
    > > And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically designed so that
    > > it *will* wear out with repeated plays.
    > >
    > > For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.
    > >
    > To the contrary, it was a highly specilaized vinyl to inhibit static
    > electricity. And the more you played the discs, the better they actually
    > looked. As the stylus worn down the special coating on the discs, it gave a
    > more accurate rendering of the pressing, as wel as make the notorious
    > "skips" go away.


    Just curious: I sold LD in the "olden" days, but never played around
    w/CED. What kind of picture/sound quality did it have compared to LD?

    Thx!

    -Doc
  11. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    "Doc" <dochifi@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:FaJje.7544$tX5.1034@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...
    > In article <uj0ie.5119$_f7.1337@trndny01>,
    > "NJM1" <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    >> >
    >> > And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically designed so
    >> > that
    >> > it *will* wear out with repeated plays.
    >> >
    >> > For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.
    >> >
    >> To the contrary, it was a highly specilaized vinyl to inhibit static
    >> electricity. And the more you played the discs, the better they actually
    >> looked. As the stylus worn down the special coating on the discs, it gave
    >> a
    >> more accurate rendering of the pressing, as well as make the notorious
    >> "skips" go away.
    >
    >
    > Just curious: I sold LD in the "olden" days, but never played around
    > w/CED. What kind of picture/sound quality did it have compared to LD?
    >
    > Thx!
    >
    > -Doc

    A step up from VHS depending on the pressing. If y'all remember Video Review
    magazine, they said the CED of Rumble Fish was superior to the LD. Of
    course, Rumble Fish was later re-issued on LD digital audio and all that. It
    was pretty much on par with Beta in terms of picture quality. Again,
    depending on the care given tomastering and pressing. The audio used CX
    noise reduction which you could hear "wroking" from time to time...kind of a
    breathing effect on the audio.

    GEEZ..I can't believe I remember all this stuff!!!
  12. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    In article <FaJje.7544$tX5.1034@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>,
    Doc <dochifi@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >In article <uj0ie.5119$_f7.1337@trndny01>,
    > "NJM1" <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    >> >
    >> > And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically designed so that
    >> > it *will* wear out with repeated plays.
    >> >
    >> > For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.
    >> >
    >> To the contrary, it was a highly specilaized vinyl to inhibit static
    >> electricity. And the more you played the discs, the better they actually
    >> looked. As the stylus worn down the special coating on the discs, it gave a
    >> more accurate rendering of the pressing, as wel as make the notorious
    >> "skips" go away.

    >Just curious: I sold LD in the "olden" days, but never played around
    >w/CED. What kind of picture/sound quality did it have compared to LD?

    CED was better than VHS. Better than standard Beta, but on
    pretty much even footing with SuperBeta based upon my viewing.
    Not as good as SB-1 however - which had a full 6Mhz BW.

    It had it's own visual 'eye-print'. Given three video sources,
    Beta, VHS, CED and switching between them you could identify each
    by it's visual signature.

    Beta was fairly accurate. Color in VHS tended to look like pastel
    painting - eg there were boundaries on the colors with jumps where
    Beta was smooth. Almost like one of the chalk drawings.

    CED had a slight vertical line going from upper right to lower left
    at about 3-5 degrees from vertical. It was not like the vertical
    black lines you would see occaisionally on some Beta Cams used
    for ENG.

    It was not as good as LD in bandwidth. My LDs seemed to be around
    400-425 lines. I never had a test disk but it looked to me like
    standard b'cast resolution - same at SuperBeta - just over 300
    lines. Nothing except DVD ever came close to ED-Beta where I
    could see the wedges on the 500 line circles of the standard test
    charts that sort of faded away about half-way to the 550 line
    resolution.

    The only real difference I saw between ED-Beta and the first
    [non-anamorphic DVDs] was the chroma noise in tape. That's
    something you can never get rid of in analog media. Typical copy
    always adds about 3db noise for each generation. It took a good
    set and trained eyes to see the problem in ED [which used the same
    tapes at SP Beta in the studios - but at 1/3 speed].

    CED had films that were never on VHS or LD because exclusive
    license arangements RCA made when they first introduced the format.
    It looked like a strong consumer format and at that time RCA's name
    was a bit shinnier than it became in later years - so that's why
    the exclusive contracts. However it meant that many things would
    not become availabe on VHS or LD until about 6 or 7 after the CED
    system was dropped.

    When CED was a viable format all the consumers benefitted as RCA
    used $24.95 - and later $19.95 as the main title price. That mean
    the LD prices dropped to about $5 more per title. As soon as
    RCA stopped making the machines new LD titles went up almost
    immediately by $5 to $20 title.

    Competition always helps the consumer. Sometimes as the expense of
    the vendor. The competition was so strong between the CED and the
    LD that JVC decided NOT to introduce the VHD in the US, keepin it
    only in Japan. It was a far better capacitance system than CED,
    and use more electronics and didn't depend so much upon mechanical
    devies, such as the mechanical servo emulaton and belt drive
    turntrables as the CED units. Later CED players went to direct
    drive turntables and the pictures looked much better on those
    machines - the 400 series.

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
  13. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    In article <IAMje.14940$_f7.11153@trndny01>, NJM1 <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    >"Doc" <dochifi@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:FaJje.7544$tX5.1034@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...
    >> In article <uj0ie.5119$_f7.1337@trndny01>,
    >> "NJM1" <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> >
    >>> > And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically designed so
    >>> > that
    >>> > it *will* wear out with repeated plays.
    >>> >
    >>> > For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.
    >>> >
    >>> To the contrary, it was a highly specilaized vinyl to inhibit static
    >>> electricity. And the more you played the discs, the better they actually
    >>> looked. As the stylus worn down the special coating on the discs, it gave
    >>> a
    >>> more accurate rendering of the pressing, as well as make the notorious
    >>> "skips" go away.
    >>
    >>
    >> Just curious: I sold LD in the "olden" days, but never played around
    >> w/CED. What kind of picture/sound quality did it have compared to LD?
    >>
    >> Thx!
    >>
    >> -Doc

    >A step up from VHS depending on the pressing. If y'all remember
    >Video Review magazine, they said the CED of Rumble Fish was
    >superior to the LD. Of course, Rumble Fish was later re-issued
    >on LD digital audio and all that. It was pretty much on par with
    >Beta in terms of picture quality. Again, depending on the care
    >given tomastering and pressing. The audio used CX noise reduction
    >which you could hear "wroking" from time to time...kind of a
    >breathing effect on the audio.

    When I got Star Wars on CED I was blown away by how good it looked.
    About this time the LD market was moving to the 1-hour per side
    with their CLV, which proved to be a problem with herringbone
    pattenrs as you could readily see on my best friends copy
    of Blazing Saddles. CLV didn't last long [though the name was
    kept] as the LD industry moved to CAA - constant angular
    acceleration - which was basically banded CAV. That mean the only
    chance for herrinbone was when they changed the speed for the next
    band. It had the advantages of CLV for length without the
    adjancent track interference. You can usually still frame the
    first band on a CAA disk even on machines that don't have 'freeze
    field' [often wrong called freeze frame except on such things
    as the 8000s].

    >GEEZ..I can't believe I remember all this stuff!!!

    I know what you mean. Now if I could only remember what I did last
    week!

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
  14. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    Actually, VHD was a victim of.....the cold!!!! Shipping was a problem
    because the discs had a narrow temperature range before they became damaged.
    So, shipping via boat or plane from Japan was out of the question. And by
    the time they DID start to figure it out, Beta was dying and LD had become
    the disc format of choice, not to mention MUSE hitting the Japan
    marketplace.


    "Bill Vermillion" <bv@wjv.com> wrote in message news:IH0HH5.1unt@wjv.com...
    > In article <FaJje.7544$tX5.1034@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>,
    > Doc <dochifi@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>In article <uj0ie.5119$_f7.1337@trndny01>,
    >> "NJM1" <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> >
    >>> > And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically designed so
    >>> > that
    >>> > it *will* wear out with repeated plays.
    >>> >
    >>> > For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.
    >>> >
    >>> To the contrary, it was a highly specilaized vinyl to inhibit static
    >>> electricity. And the more you played the discs, the better they actually
    >>> looked. As the stylus worn down the special coating on the discs, it
    >>> gave a
    >>> more accurate rendering of the pressing, as wel as make the notorious
    >>> "skips" go away.
    >
    >>Just curious: I sold LD in the "olden" days, but never played around
    >>w/CED. What kind of picture/sound quality did it have compared to LD?
    >
    > CED was better than VHS. Better than standard Beta, but on
    > pretty much even footing with SuperBeta based upon my viewing.
    > Not as good as SB-1 however - which had a full 6Mhz BW.
    >
    > It had it's own visual 'eye-print'. Given three video sources,
    > Beta, VHS, CED and switching between them you could identify each
    > by it's visual signature.
    >
    > Beta was fairly accurate. Color in VHS tended to look like pastel
    > painting - eg there were boundaries on the colors with jumps where
    > Beta was smooth. Almost like one of the chalk drawings.
    >
    > CED had a slight vertical line going from upper right to lower left
    > at about 3-5 degrees from vertical. It was not like the vertical
    > black lines you would see occaisionally on some Beta Cams used
    > for ENG.
    >
    > It was not as good as LD in bandwidth. My LDs seemed to be around
    > 400-425 lines. I never had a test disk but it looked to me like
    > standard b'cast resolution - same at SuperBeta - just over 300
    > lines. Nothing except DVD ever came close to ED-Beta where I
    > could see the wedges on the 500 line circles of the standard test
    > charts that sort of faded away about half-way to the 550 line
    > resolution.
    >
    > The only real difference I saw between ED-Beta and the first
    > [non-anamorphic DVDs] was the chroma noise in tape. That's
    > something you can never get rid of in analog media. Typical copy
    > always adds about 3db noise for each generation. It took a good
    > set and trained eyes to see the problem in ED [which used the same
    > tapes at SP Beta in the studios - but at 1/3 speed].
    >
    > CED had films that were never on VHS or LD because exclusive
    > license arangements RCA made when they first introduced the format.
    > It looked like a strong consumer format and at that time RCA's name
    > was a bit shinnier than it became in later years - so that's why
    > the exclusive contracts. However it meant that many things would
    > not become availabe on VHS or LD until about 6 or 7 after the CED
    > system was dropped.
    >
    > When CED was a viable format all the consumers benefitted as RCA
    > used $24.95 - and later $19.95 as the main title price. That mean
    > the LD prices dropped to about $5 more per title. As soon as
    > RCA stopped making the machines new LD titles went up almost
    > immediately by $5 to $20 title.
    >
    > Competition always helps the consumer. Sometimes as the expense of
    > the vendor. The competition was so strong between the CED and the
    > LD that JVC decided NOT to introduce the VHD in the US, keepin it
    > only in Japan. It was a far better capacitance system than CED,
    > and use more electronics and didn't depend so much upon mechanical
    > devies, such as the mechanical servo emulaton and belt drive
    > turntrables as the CED units. Later CED players went to direct
    > drive turntables and the pictures looked much better on those
    > machines - the 400 series.
    >
    > Bill
    >
    > --
    > Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
  15. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    In article <LPYke.993$gk3.407@trndny07>, NJM1 <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:
    >Actually, VHD was a victim of.....the cold!!!! Shipping was a problem
    >because the discs had a narrow temperature range before they became damaged.
    >So, shipping via boat or plane from Japan was out of the question. And by
    >the time they DID start to figure it out, Beta was dying and LD had become
    >the disc format of choice, not to mention MUSE hitting the Japan
    >marketplace.


    That's interesting information. I saw the VHD, an intresting quad
    audio, and a digital cassette recorder using the standard cassette
    size shell in a room JVC had at an AES show in NYC in the late
    1970s [or thereabouts].

    It was interesting technology. A frined of mine worked at the JVC
    1/2 spped master lab in LA [designed to master the RCA quad LP
    discs and converted to high-end audio, and I remember him telling
    me that JVC had tons of money in VHD and it almost had to succeed
    if JVC was to survive.

    And Beta died in the US but stayed quite large in other countries.
    When there were almost no Beta blanks in local stores all you had
    to was visit Sea World or Disney, and there were Beta blanks
    everywhere as most of the SA tourists were using Beta Camcorders.
    Very few VHS from the SA tourists.

    LD was the format of choice for collectors/film-buffs, while the
    media selection for CED was more equivalent of the VHS tape
    librarys. When LD had about 400 titles in it's category one store
    here had at least twice that many on display on their shelves, with
    titles running down one wall and around the end of the room, and
    many bays standing alone with hundreds of titles.

    I do miss the great collectors selections we used to see on LD and
    only now are we starting to see some on DVD.

    Bill
    >
    >"Bill Vermillion" <bv@wjv.com> wrote in message news:IH0HH5.1unt@wjv.com...
    >> In article <FaJje.7544$tX5.1034@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>,
    >> Doc <dochifi@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>>In article <uj0ie.5119$_f7.1337@trndny01>,
    >>> "NJM1" <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> >
    >>>> > And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically designed so
    >>>> > that
    >>>> > it *will* wear out with repeated plays.
    >>>> >
    >>>> > For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.
    >>>> >
    >>>> To the contrary, it was a highly specilaized vinyl to inhibit static
    >>>> electricity. And the more you played the discs, the better they actually
    >>>> looked. As the stylus worn down the special coating on the discs, it
    >>>> gave a
    >>>> more accurate rendering of the pressing, as wel as make the notorious
    >>>> "skips" go away.
    >>
    >>>Just curious: I sold LD in the "olden" days, but never played around
    >>>w/CED. What kind of picture/sound quality did it have compared to LD?
    >>
    >> CED was better than VHS. Better than standard Beta, but on
    >> pretty much even footing with SuperBeta based upon my viewing.
    >> Not as good as SB-1 however - which had a full 6Mhz BW.
    >>
    >> It had it's own visual 'eye-print'. Given three video sources,
    >> Beta, VHS, CED and switching between them you could identify each
    >> by it's visual signature.
    >>
    >> Beta was fairly accurate. Color in VHS tended to look like pastel
    >> painting - eg there were boundaries on the colors with jumps where
    >> Beta was smooth. Almost like one of the chalk drawings.
    >>
    >> CED had a slight vertical line going from upper right to lower left
    >> at about 3-5 degrees from vertical. It was not like the vertical
    >> black lines you would see occaisionally on some Beta Cams used
    >> for ENG.
    >>
    >> It was not as good as LD in bandwidth. My LDs seemed to be around
    >> 400-425 lines. I never had a test disk but it looked to me like
    >> standard b'cast resolution - same at SuperBeta - just over 300
    >> lines. Nothing except DVD ever came close to ED-Beta where I
    >> could see the wedges on the 500 line circles of the standard test
    >> charts that sort of faded away about half-way to the 550 line
    >> resolution.
    >>
    >> The only real difference I saw between ED-Beta and the first
    >> [non-anamorphic DVDs] was the chroma noise in tape. That's
    >> something you can never get rid of in analog media. Typical copy
    >> always adds about 3db noise for each generation. It took a good
    >> set and trained eyes to see the problem in ED [which used the same
    >> tapes at SP Beta in the studios - but at 1/3 speed].
    >>
    >> CED had films that were never on VHS or LD because exclusive
    >> license arangements RCA made when they first introduced the format.
    >> It looked like a strong consumer format and at that time RCA's name
    >> was a bit shinnier than it became in later years - so that's why
    >> the exclusive contracts. However it meant that many things would
    >> not become availabe on VHS or LD until about 6 or 7 after the CED
    >> system was dropped.
    >>
    >> When CED was a viable format all the consumers benefitted as RCA
    >> used $24.95 - and later $19.95 as the main title price. That mean
    >> the LD prices dropped to about $5 more per title. As soon as
    >> RCA stopped making the machines new LD titles went up almost
    >> immediately by $5 to $20 title.
    >>
    >> Competition always helps the consumer. Sometimes as the expense of
    >> the vendor. The competition was so strong between the CED and the
    >> LD that JVC decided NOT to introduce the VHD in the US, keepin it
    >> only in Japan. It was a far better capacitance system than CED,
    >> and use more electronics and didn't depend so much upon mechanical
    >> devies, such as the mechanical servo emulaton and belt drive
    >> turntrables as the CED units. Later CED players went to direct
    >> drive turntables and the pictures looked much better on those
    >> machines - the 400 series.
    >>
    >> Bill
    >>
    >> --
    >> Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
    >
    >


    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
  16. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    "Bill Vermillion" <bv@wjv.com> wrote in message news:IH4Mws.98M@wjv.com...

    > I do miss the great collectors selections we used to see on LD and
    > only now are we starting to see some on DVD.

    Despite what the vendors call those DVDs,
    I wouldn't consider something with
    a guaranteed limited life and
    which could cease to function at any moment,
    a "collectors edition".
  17. Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc,pdx.forsale,seattle.forsale.misc (More info?)

    In article <IH0HoM.1us7@wjv.com>, bv@wjv.com (Bill Vermillion) wrote:

    > In article <IAMje.14940$_f7.11153@trndny01>, NJM1 <vze34wdv@verizon.net>
    > wrote:
    > >
    > >"Doc" <dochifi@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > >news:FaJje.7544$tX5.1034@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...
    > >> In article <uj0ie.5119$_f7.1337@trndny01>,
    > >> "NJM1" <vze34wdv@verizon.net> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> >
    > >>> > And CED is essentially a pressed paper disk, specifically designed so
    > >>> > that
    > >>> > it *will* wear out with repeated plays.
    > >>> >
    > >>> > For once, superior technology won out in the marketplace.
    > >>> >
    > >>> To the contrary, it was a highly specilaized vinyl to inhibit static
    > >>> electricity. And the more you played the discs, the better they actually
    > >>> looked. As the stylus worn down the special coating on the discs, it gave
    > >>> a
    > >>> more accurate rendering of the pressing, as well as make the notorious
    > >>> "skips" go away.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Just curious: I sold LD in the "olden" days, but never played around
    > >> w/CED. What kind of picture/sound quality did it have compared to LD?
    > >>
    > >> Thx!
    > >>
    > >> -Doc
    >
    > >A step up from VHS depending on the pressing. If y'all remember
    > >Video Review magazine, they said the CED of Rumble Fish was
    > >superior to the LD. Of course, Rumble Fish was later re-issued
    > >on LD digital audio and all that. It was pretty much on par with
    > >Beta in terms of picture quality. Again, depending on the care
    > >given tomastering and pressing. The audio used CX noise reduction
    > >which you could hear "wroking" from time to time...kind of a
    > >breathing effect on the audio.
    >
    > When I got Star Wars on CED I was blown away by how good it looked.
    > About this time the LD market was moving to the 1-hour per side
    > with their CLV, which proved to be a problem with herringbone
    > pattenrs as you could readily see on my best friends copy
    > of Blazing Saddles. CLV didn't last long [though the name was
    > kept] as the LD industry moved to CAA - constant angular
    > acceleration - which was basically banded CAV. That mean the only
    > chance for herrinbone was when they changed the speed for the next
    > band. It had the advantages of CLV for length without the
    > adjancent track interference. You can usually still frame the
    > first band on a CAA disk even on machines that don't have 'freeze
    > field' [often wrong called freeze frame except on such things
    > as the 8000s].
    >
    > >GEEZ..I can't believe I remember all this stuff!!!
    >
    > I know what you mean. Now if I could only remember what I did last
    > week!
    >
    > Bill

    I have thoroughly enjoyed this thread (don't think i'll be running out
    and buying a CED machine, though). I told my wife it is nice to know
    there are others out their with more electronics trivia in their heads
    than I. So thanks, gang!

    -Doc
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