Big improvement in picture quality

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

When my nephew visited recently, I mentioned that I was NOT happy with the
picture quality that I have on my big screen Sony. I have TimeWarner cable
input; and I use two Tivo's. I use a splitter so I can record one program
and watch another. I do NOT have digital coming in and I don't want it ( so
I can record and watch ).

He's been in the cable business for fifteen years or so. He asked how many
TV's I had in the house, and how many of those were connected to my cable
system I answered 5 and all 5 are connected to the cable.

He spent a minute explaining Decibels, etc....and we went to Best-Buy. We
bought ( for about $12.00 ) a 10 db 110 v. powered amplifier. Ten minutes
to hook it up on the main incoming line.... and all 6 TV's look like
brand-new.

Just thought I would share. RichG TX

--
RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
..
23 answers Last reply
More about big improvement picture quality
  1. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    In article <GWxee.1403$7U.138@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com>,
    "RichG" <rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net> wrote:

    > When my nephew visited recently, I mentioned that I was NOT happy with the
    > picture quality that I have on my big screen Sony. I have TimeWarner cable
    > input; and I use two Tivo's. I use a splitter so I can record one program
    > and watch another. I do NOT have digital coming in and I don't want it ( so
    > I can record and watch ).
    >
    > He's been in the cable business for fifteen years or so. He asked how many
    > TV's I had in the house, and how many of those were connected to my cable
    > system I answered 5 and all 5 are connected to the cable.
    >
    > He spent a minute explaining Decibels, etc....and we went to Best-Buy. We
    > bought ( for about $12.00 ) a 10 db 110 v. powered amplifier. Ten minutes
    > to hook it up on the main incoming line.... and all 6 TV's look like
    > brand-new.
    >
    > Just thought I would share. RichG TX

    Typical "You're just a piece of cash flow" thinking that the cable
    company hadnt done this upon install.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    While I agree that the cable companies don't much care much about individual
    clients, in fairness to them....I probably added two or three TV's since I
    had the original install some 5 years ago.

    Rather than spend two days waiting for someone to please show up and "try"
    to fix the picture quality issue.. it seems that a $12.00 solution was a
    good thing for me.

    --
    RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
    http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
    ..
  3. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    "RichG" <rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net> wrote in message
    news:awJee.1359$1o3.228@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
    > While I agree that the cable companies don't much care much about
    individual
    > clients, in fairness to them....I probably added two or three TV's since I
    > had the original install some 5 years ago.
    >
    > Rather than spend two days waiting for someone to please show up and "try"
    > to fix the picture quality issue.. it seems that a $12.00 solution was a
    > good thing for me.
    >
    > --
    > RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
    > http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
    > .
    >
    >

    Not to mention that 4 hour time window they give you !!!!
  4. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    In article <wZQee.5080$7F4.1729@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>,
    "Scooby" <mmscooby1@removeme.earthlink.net> wrote:

    > "RichG" <rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net> wrote in message
    > news:awJee.1359$1o3.228@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
    > > While I agree that the cable companies don't much care much about
    > individual
    > > clients, in fairness to them....I probably added two or three TV's since I
    > > had the original install some 5 years ago.
    > >
    > > Rather than spend two days waiting for someone to please show up and "try"
    > > to fix the picture quality issue.. it seems that a $12.00 solution was a
    > > good thing for me.
    > >
    > > --
    > > RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
    > > http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
    > > .
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Not to mention that 4 hour time window they give you !!!!

    and in the case of Warner Cable in Houston, They may meet the window,
    and then "discover" they don't have the key to your apartment complex's
    wiring closet.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    TWC, Houston is my vendor , too. They make an appointment..... I give up a
    day of fishing or golfing..they show up. ..two, or maybe three or more hours
    late..they don't have the necessary materials or... even, in one case..a
    LADDER.... to get up the pole ( I lent them mine to save me another day of
    frustration)...

    Life is much too short for this. And now they have the audacity to buy TV
    ads advertising against competition from SBC ( not much better, in my
    opinion...)

    Somebody's got to find a better way to deliver the signal. Satellite dishes
    go out in storms; cable can't get it right...seems like there is room for
    improvement here.
    --
    RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
    http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
    ..

    "Jack Zwick" <jzwick3@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    news:jzwick3-93A64F.16312906052005@news1.west.earthlink.net...
    > In article <wZQee.5080$7F4.1729@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>,
    > "Scooby" <mmscooby1@removeme.earthlink.net> wrote:
    >
    > > "RichG" <rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net> wrote in message
    > > news:awJee.1359$1o3.228@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
    > > > While I agree that the cable companies don't much care much about
    > > individual
    > > > clients, in fairness to them....I probably added two or three TV's
    since I
    > > > had the original install some 5 years ago.
    > > >
    > > > Rather than spend two days waiting for someone to please show up and
    "try"
    > > > to fix the picture quality issue.. it seems that a $12.00 solution
    was a
    > > > good thing for me.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
    > > > http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
    > > > .
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > > Not to mention that 4 hour time window they give you !!!!
    >
    > and in the case of Warner Cable in Houston, They may meet the window,
    > and then "discover" they don't have the key to your apartment complex's
    > wiring closet.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    > Somebody's got to find a better way to deliver the signal. Satellite dishes
    > go out in storms; cable can't get it right...seems like there is room for
    > improvement here.

    I know we've been over this, but even as a cable customer, I think the
    storm dish issue is *way* overblown. I'd love to see an average yearly
    outage rate per customer due to storms, I bet it's less than 15 minutes
    per year.

    There are other, more legitimate problems that may be encountered with
    satellite, mainly lacking line of sight due to tall buildings, mountains
    or trees, an admittedly anemic amount of HD content (which is
    improving), and inconstant access to local stations. Plus there are
    always issues of overcompression as they try to get the most channels in
    the least bandwidth. But cable suffers from the last one as well, with
    less excuse (since they have much more available bandwidth).

    Randy S.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    "Randy S." <rswittNO@SPAMgmail.com> wrote in message
    news:d5hgma$rn0$1@spnode25.nerdc.ufl.edu...
    >
    > > Somebody's got to find a better way to deliver the signal. Satellite
    dishes
    > > go out in storms; cable can't get it right...seems like there is room
    for
    > > improvement here.
    >
    > I know we've been over this, but even as a cable customer, I think the
    > storm dish issue is *way* overblown. I'd love to see an average yearly
    > outage rate per customer due to storms, I bet it's less than 15 minutes
    > per year.
    >
    > There are other, more legitimate problems that may be encountered with
    > satellite, mainly lacking line of sight due to tall buildings, mountains
    > or trees, an admittedly anemic amount of HD content (which is
    > improving), and inconstant access to local stations. Plus there are
    > always issues of overcompression as they try to get the most channels in
    > the least bandwidth. But cable suffers from the last one as well, with
    > less excuse (since they have much more available bandwidth).
    >
    > Randy S.

    I would guess that mine (Sat TV) goes out more like about 1-1.5 hours per
    year - of which I notice. A majority of that would be early summer when we
    have pretty harsh evening storms. That is a lot less than I used to lose
    cable and less than I currently lose my cable internet. For reference, I
    live in North Carolina.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    You must live in a pretty "weather -passive" area. I had dish for five years
    ( Summers only ) at my cottage in northern Illinois.

    EVERY time we had a storm to the South.... ( which was the ONLY time that I
    bothered to watch TV ) the d^%$# dish went out. Half hour later, after
    watching the storm move off, over the lake..the picture came back on. It
    seemed that when I "needed" the TV for entertainment ( I couldn't fish or
    golf ) it was out. Maybe only 1 or 2 hours a month..but it was the one or
    two hours that I wanted to watch the darn thing. --
    RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
    http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
    ..

    "Scooby" <mmscooby1@removeme.earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:kv1fe.5296$7F4.2019@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > "Randy S." <rswittNO@SPAMgmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:d5hgma$rn0$1@spnode25.nerdc.ufl.edu...
    > >
    > > > Somebody's got to find a better way to deliver the signal. Satellite
    > dishes
    > > > go out in storms; cable can't get it right...seems like there is room
    > for
    > > > improvement here.
    > >
    > > I know we've been over this, but even as a cable customer, I think the
    > > storm dish issue is *way* overblown. I'd love to see an average yearly
    > > outage rate per customer due to storms, I bet it's less than 15 minutes
    > > per year.
    > >
    > > There are other, more legitimate problems that may be encountered with
    (snip)
    > less excuse (since they have much more available bandwidth).
    > >
    > > Randy S.
    >***********************************************************
    > I would guess that mine (Sat TV) goes out more like about 1-1.5 hours per
    > year - of which I notice. A majority of that would be early summer when
    we
    > have pretty harsh evening storms. That is a lot less than I used to lose
    > cable and less than I currently lose my cable internet. For reference, I
    > live in North Carolina.
    ******************************************************************>
  9. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    RichG wrote:
    > You must live in a pretty "weather -passive" area. I had dish for five years
    > ( Summers only ) at my cottage in northern Illinois.
    >
    > EVERY time we had a storm to the South.... ( which was the ONLY time that I
    > bothered to watch TV ) the d^%$# dish went out. Half hour later, after
    > watching the storm move off, over the lake..the picture came back on. It
    > seemed that when I "needed" the TV for entertainment ( I couldn't fish or
    > golf ) it was out. Maybe only 1 or 2 hours a month..but it was the one or
    > two hours that I wanted to watch the darn thing. --
    > RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
    > http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
    > .

    I keep reading *highly* divergent anecdotes about rainfade experiences,
    and at least a portion of the discordance has got to be attributable to
    individual cases and not due to the system as a whole, there is just too
    much variance. Some of the difference can probably be attributed to
    location, more northern installations will be more prone to noticeable
    rain-fade than southern ones since the satellite elevation angle is
    shallower and the signal path passes through a longer distance of
    atmosphere, but the geosynchronous satellites are high enough that I
    don't think the actual increase is too much. Some of it can probably be
    attributed to aiming precision, dishes aimed more precisely will
    obviously be less-prone to rain-fade. And probably some of it is due to
    exaggeration, poor experiences stand out so those who've experienced
    them with either cable or satellite will remember them as taking up an
    exaggerated period of time.

    Randy S.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    RichG (rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net) wrote in alt.video.ptv.tivo:
    > You must live in a pretty "weather -passive" area. I had dish for five years
    > ( Summers only ) at my cottage in northern Illinois.
    >
    > EVERY time we had a storm to the South.... ( which was the ONLY time that I
    > bothered to watch TV ) the d^%$# dish went out.

    I think "had dish" is the operative term. Both satellite companies have
    done a lot of tweaking to their signal strengths in the last two years. I
    noticed a lot more outages when I first got DirecTV than I have lately,
    and the weather is pretty much the same as always (DC area). In particular,
    the spot beams for locals are a lot more powerful, so even when I lose
    something due to rain fade, the locals might still be on.

    --
    Jeff Rife |
    | http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/OverTheHedge/TeriHatcher.gif
  11. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    "Jeff Rife" <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1ce6ac0d4d2ccb5d989d19@news.nabs.net...
    > RichG (rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net) wrote in alt.video.ptv.tivo:
    > > You must live in a pretty "weather -passive" area. I had dish for five
    years
    > > ( Summers only ) at my cottage in northern Illinois.
    > >
    > > EVERY time we had a storm to the South.... ( which was the ONLY time
    that I
    > > bothered to watch TV ) the d^%$# dish went out.
    >
    > I think "had dish" is the operative term. Both satellite companies have
    > done a lot of tweaking to their signal strengths in the last two years. I
    > noticed a lot more outages when I first got DirecTV than I have lately,
    > and the weather is pretty much the same as always (DC area). In
    particular,
    > the spot beams for locals are a lot more powerful, so even when I lose
    > something due to rain fade, the locals might still be on.
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Rife |
    > | http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/OverTheHedge/TeriHatcher.gif

    Actually, we get some pretty mean storms. But, when it happens, it seems
    like I only lose the signal for a piece of it (5-10 minutes) - it usually
    takes a pretty good electrical storm before mine goes out. Most rain storms
    do not cause me any problems. The interesting part is this... The storms
    come in from the southwest - exactly where my dish points. When I lose my
    signal, there is often no rain, or light rain. It is 10-15 minutes before
    the worst part of the storm hits. By the time that the bad part is on top
    of me, my signal is back. It is a neat little built in storm warning system
    <grin>.

    I think another key is the availability of good signal under the right
    circumstances. My signal meter on an average day is around 98-99. So, it
    takes a lot to get mine to drop to an unwatchable level. If you have a poor
    view, poor installation or something else affecting your signal strength,
    then you will lose it quicker during rain storms.

    I guess if you only watch tv when there is a storm outside, you will see a
    higher percentage of time that there is an issue.

    Jim
  12. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    I guess I fell into "all of the above" as reasons for it dropping out.
    1. I watched it more often when crummy weather was forecast.
    2. I was way up north with a low angle to the horizon.
    3. my last experience was about 20 months ago..so things may well be better
    now.

    The point is still, though..that having your signal ( from cable; satellite;
    DSL etc. ) drop out completely for part of your viewing time is a PIA and
    shouldn't be unsolvable ( for the right $$$ ). If airline pilots had to
    worry about losing touch with the tower as often as I lost touch with my
    TV...there would be a solution found ....pronto.

    Let's see...two dishes, pointing at different areas of the sky; redundant
    broadcasting; a switchable device to automatically pick up the stronger
    signal. Yea.. just lots of $$$ and it is solved.

    RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
    http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
    ..

    "Scooby" <mmscooby1@removeme.earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:sN5fe.5401$7F4.5083@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > "Jeff Rife" <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote in message
    > news:MPG.1ce6ac0d4d2ccb5d989d19@news.nabs.net...
    > > RichG (rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net) wrote in alt.video.ptv.tivo:
    > > > You must live in a pretty "weather -passive" area. I had dish for five
    > years
    > > > ( Summers only ) at my cottage in northern Illinois.
    > > >
    > > > EVERY time we had a storm to the South.... ( which was the ONLY time
    > that I
    > > > bothered to watch TV ) the d^%$# dish went out.
    > >
    > > I think "had dish" is the operative term. Both satellite companies have
    > > done a lot of tweaking to their signal strengths in the last two years.
    I
    > > noticed a lot more outages when I first got DirecTV than I have lately,
    > > and the weather is pretty much the same as always (DC area). In
    > particular,
    > > the spot beams for locals are a lot more powerful, so even when I lose
    > > something due to rain fade, the locals might still be on.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Jeff Rife |
    > > | http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/OverTheHedge/TeriHatcher.gif
    >
    > Actually, we get some pretty mean storms. But, when it happens, it seems
    > like I only lose the signal for a piece of it (5-10 minutes) - it usually
    > takes a pretty good electrical storm before mine goes out. Most rain
    storms
    > do not cause me any problems. The interesting part is this... The storms
    > come in from the southwest - exactly where my dish points. When I lose my
    > signal, there is often no rain, or light rain. It is 10-15 minutes before
    > the worst part of the storm hits. By the time that the bad part is on top
    > of me, my signal is back. It is a neat little built in storm warning
    system
    > <grin>.
    >
    > I think another key is the availability of good signal under the right
    > circumstances. My signal meter on an average day is around 98-99. So, it
    > takes a lot to get mine to drop to an unwatchable level. If you have a
    poor
    > view, poor installation or something else affecting your signal strength,
    > then you will lose it quicker during rain storms.
    >
    > I guess if you only watch tv when there is a storm outside, you will see a
    > higher percentage of time that there is an issue.
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    RichG (rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net) wrote in alt.video.ptv.tivo:
    > The point is still, though..that having your signal ( from cable; satellite;
    > DSL etc. ) drop out completely for part of your viewing time is a PIA and
    > shouldn't be unsolvable ( for the right $$$ ).

    For DBS, a 1-meter dish with a dual LNB works great for making downtime
    almost nil. The trouble is you need one for each satellite...I'd need
    three.

    > If airline pilots had to
    > worry about losing touch with the tower as often as I lost touch with my
    > TV...there would be a solution found ....pronto.

    Sure, but then who dies if you don't get to watch TV? Or, since this is
    a TiVo newsgroup, I'm sure you have something to watch even if the cable
    (or satellite) goes out for a few days.

    --
    Jeff Rife |
    | http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/FoxTrot/Blackboard.gif
  14. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    RichG wrote:
    > I guess I fell into "all of the above" as reasons for it dropping out.
    > 1. I watched it more often when crummy weather was forecast.
    > 2. I was way up north with a low angle to the horizon.
    > 3. my last experience was about 20 months ago..so things may well be better
    > now.
    >
    > The point is still, though..that having your signal ( from cable; satellite;
    > DSL etc. ) drop out completely for part of your viewing time is a PIA and
    > shouldn't be unsolvable ( for the right $$$ ). If airline pilots had to
    > worry about losing touch with the tower as often as I lost touch with my
    > TV...there would be a solution found ....pronto.

    Well, TV is a much higher bandwidth signal and isn't quite as crucial a
    service, so I'd say it doesn't quite demand the dollars that the other does.

    >
    > Let's see...two dishes, pointing at different areas of the sky; redundant
    > broadcasting; a switchable device to automatically pick up the stronger
    > signal. Yea.. just lots of $$$ and it is solved.

    Geosynchronous satellites (the only ones that stay in a fixed position
    relative to earth and thus are useful for a fixed dish) must be placed
    in an equatorial orbit (no other geosynchronous orbit is stable). That
    means that for those of us north of the equator, your dish will always
    point in some southerly direction. Directv *does* use multiple
    satellite positions now (though they're not redundant, I don't believe,
    due to expense), but a big storm blocking the entire southern sky is
    still going to affect all of them. However, you are much more likely to
    lose some stations rather than all. With the new sats going up, you may
    find you lose the HD local feeds but keep the rest, or vice versa.

    Randy S.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    In article <99Xee.1706$7U.1626@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com>,
    "RichG" <rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net> wrote:

    > TWC, Houston is my vendor , too. They make an appointment..... I give up a
    > day of fishing or golfing..they show up. ..two, or maybe three or more hours
    > late..they don't have the necessary materials or... even, in one case..a
    > LADDER.... to get up the pole ( I lent them mine to save me another day of
    > frustration)...
    >
    > Life is much too short for this. And now they have the audacity to buy TV
    > ads advertising against competition from SBC ( not much better, in my
    > opinion...)
    >
    > Somebody's got to find a better way to deliver the signal. Satellite dishes
    > go out in storms; cable can't get it right...seems like there is room for
    > improvement here.

    If you're in Houston, DirecTv is F A R superior to TWC. Dont fall for
    their propaganda about signal going out when it rains.

    2 or 3 times a year when its raining harder than two inches per hour you
    could lose the signal, but at those times it's likely also lightening so
    much, you'd feel safer having all your electronics off.

    I switched from TWC to DirecTv 8 years ago, and NEVER regretted it, and
    now have had DirecTiVo for that last 2 1/2 years. AWESOME.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    In article <wv7fe.4421$Vz4.3598@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>, "RichG" <rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net> wrote:
    >I guess I fell into "all of the above" as reasons for it dropping out.
    >1. I watched it more often when crummy weather was forecast.
    >2. I was way up north with a low angle to the horizon.
    >3. my last experience was about 20 months ago..so things may well be better
    >now.
    >
    >The point is still, though..that having your signal ( from cable; satellite;
    >DSL etc. ) drop out completely for part of your viewing time is a PIA and
    >shouldn't be unsolvable ( for the right $$$ ). If airline pilots had to
    >worry about losing touch with the tower as often as I lost touch with my
    >TV...there would be a solution found ....pronto.
    >
    >Let's see...two dishes, pointing at different areas of the sky; redundant
    >broadcasting; a switchable device to automatically pick up the stronger
    >signal. Yea.. just lots of $$$ and it is solved.
    >

    You are not forced to stick with a 18" dish you know, there are much bigger
    ones available for those fringe areas.


    >RichG manager, Carolina Skiff Owners Group on MSN
    >http://groups.msn.com/CarolinaSkiffOwners
    >..
    >
    >"Scooby" <mmscooby1@removeme.earthlink.net> wrote in message
    >news:sN5fe.5401$7F4.5083@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >> "Jeff Rife" <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote in message
    >> news:MPG.1ce6ac0d4d2ccb5d989d19@news.nabs.net...
    >> > RichG (rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net) wrote in alt.video.ptv.tivo:
    >> > > You must live in a pretty "weather -passive" area. I had dish for five
    >> years
    >> > > ( Summers only ) at my cottage in northern Illinois.
    >> > >
    >> > > EVERY time we had a storm to the South.... ( which was the ONLY time
    >> that I
    >> > > bothered to watch TV ) the d^%$# dish went out.
    >> >
    >> > I think "had dish" is the operative term. Both satellite companies have
    >> > done a lot of tweaking to their signal strengths in the last two years.
    >I
    >> > noticed a lot more outages when I first got DirecTV than I have lately,
    >> > and the weather is pretty much the same as always (DC area). In
    >> particular,
    >> > the spot beams for locals are a lot more powerful, so even when I lose
    >> > something due to rain fade, the locals might still be on.
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > Jeff Rife |
    >> > | http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/OverTheHedge/TeriHatcher.gif
    >>
    >> Actually, we get some pretty mean storms. But, when it happens, it seems
    >> like I only lose the signal for a piece of it (5-10 minutes) - it usually
    >> takes a pretty good electrical storm before mine goes out. Most rain
    >storms
    >> do not cause me any problems. The interesting part is this... The storms
    >> come in from the southwest - exactly where my dish points. When I lose my
    >> signal, there is often no rain, or light rain. It is 10-15 minutes before
    >> the worst part of the storm hits. By the time that the bad part is on top
    >> of me, my signal is back. It is a neat little built in storm warning
    >system
    >> <grin>.
    >>
    >> I think another key is the availability of good signal under the right
    >> circumstances. My signal meter on an average day is around 98-99. So, it
    >> takes a lot to get mine to drop to an unwatchable level. If you have a
    >poor
    >> view, poor installation or something else affecting your signal strength,
    >> then you will lose it quicker during rain storms.
    >>
    >> I guess if you only watch tv when there is a storm outside, you will see a
    >> higher percentage of time that there is an issue.
    >>
    >> Jim
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  17. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    On Sat, 07 May 2005 04:06:29 GMT, "RichG" <rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net>
    wrote:
    >Somebody's got to find a better way to deliver the signal. Satellite dishes
    >go out in storms; cable can't get it right...seems like there is room for
    >improvement here.

    I've got both, (basic cable comes "free" with Cable Internet access),
    have had them both for about 4.5 years now. I live in Seattle, we gets
    lots of rain. I have a TiVo, so it is recording at all sorts of random
    times.

    On DirecTV I see some weather-related pixelation for about 10-30sec
    about once every 2 weeks. I get an actual signal loss of 15-40sec
    about once every 6 months.

    On cable I get one outage of 1+hrs about once a month. These will
    occasionally cause me to miss aan entire program, the DirecTV problems
    have never caused me to miss more than a few minutes of a broadcast.

    The digital sound seems much better on DirecTV as well.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    In article <0p6v71daf4e62g2ctdt4ktm8nvnmv8bftj@4ax.com>,
    Scott <spam784@spam.spam> wrote:

    > On Sat, 07 May 2005 04:06:29 GMT, "RichG" <rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net>
    > wrote:
    > >Somebody's got to find a better way to deliver the signal. Satellite dishes
    > >go out in storms; cable can't get it right...seems like there is room for
    > >improvement here.
    >
    > I've got both, (basic cable comes "free" with Cable Internet access),
    > have had them both for about 4.5 years now. I live in Seattle, we gets
    > lots of rain. I have a TiVo, so it is recording at all sorts of random
    > times.
    >
    > On DirecTV I see some weather-related pixelation for about 10-30sec
    > about once every 2 weeks. I get an actual signal loss of 15-40sec
    > about once every 6 months.
    >
    > On cable I get one outage of 1+hrs about once a month. These will
    > occasionally cause me to miss aan entire program, the DirecTV problems
    > have never caused me to miss more than a few minutes of a broadcast.
    >
    > The digital sound seems much better on DirecTV as well.

    Cable varies with the local franchise.

    DirecTv gets better the farther South you live. It's GREAT in Houston.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    On Sat, 07 May 2005 00:37:30 -0400, "Randy S." <rswittNO@SPAMgmail.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >> Somebody's got to find a better way to deliver the signal. Satellite dishes
    >> go out in storms; cable can't get it right...seems like there is room for
    >> improvement here.
    >
    >I know we've been over this, but even as a cable customer, I think the
    >storm dish issue is *way* overblown. I'd love to see an average yearly
    >outage rate per customer due to storms, I bet it's less than 15 minutes
    >per year.

    In New England, I didn't lose my signal once due to snow this year - and it
    was a heavier snow year than normal.

    As for rain, if a seriously nasty cloud is approaching the signal may go
    out for 2-3 minutes while it passes over. It's also a good indicator to
    close the windows in about 10 minutes when the storm hits us!

    15 minutes a year is reasonable. Maybe as much as 30.

    I can say, without question, I've lost cable for longer than this on single
    instances. Never mind cumulative over the whole year.

    Never again. I'll live with 5 channels OTA before I ever go back to cable.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    On Tue, 10 May 2005 11:00:02 GMT, Jack Zwick <jzwick4@mindspring.com>
    wrote:

    >In article <0p6v71daf4e62g2ctdt4ktm8nvnmv8bftj@4ax.com>,
    > Scott <spam784@spam.spam> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 07 May 2005 04:06:29 GMT, "RichG" <rich99sue@sbcxxxglobal.net>
    >> wrote:
    >> >Somebody's got to find a better way to deliver the signal. Satellite dishes
    >> >go out in storms; cable can't get it right...seems like there is room for
    >> >improvement here.
    >>
    >> I've got both, (basic cable comes "free" with Cable Internet access),
    >> have had them both for about 4.5 years now. I live in Seattle, we gets
    >> lots of rain. I have a TiVo, so it is recording at all sorts of random
    >> times.
    >>
    >> On DirecTV I see some weather-related pixelation for about 10-30sec
    >> about once every 2 weeks. I get an actual signal loss of 15-40sec
    >> about once every 6 months.
    >>
    >> On cable I get one outage of 1+hrs about once a month. These will
    >> occasionally cause me to miss aan entire program, the DirecTV problems
    >> have never caused me to miss more than a few minutes of a broadcast.
    >>
    >> The digital sound seems much better on DirecTV as well.
    >
    >Cable varies with the local franchise.
    >
    >DirecTv gets better the farther South you live. It's GREAT in Houston.

    Better how? You either get the signal or you don't. A 50% signal strength
    looks no different than a 100% signal strength.

    I happen to be in one of the farthest areas for reception, yet I still get
    high 90's and a few 100%'s on just about every channel.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    > Better how? You either get the signal or you don't. A 50% signal strength
    > looks no different than a 100% signal strength.
    >
    > I happen to be in one of the farthest areas for reception, yet I still get
    > high 90's and a few 100%'s on just about every channel.

    I think he means that the farther south you are, the less attenuation
    you will experience from rain or snow fall (obviously from snow
    accumulation as well, but for different reasons ;-) ). Since the angle
    to the satellite is shallower, the path through a cloud zone is longer
    and will attenuate the signal more in more northern installations. IOW,
    more southern installations will experience rain-fade less often on
    average. Other than that, there really shouldn't be much difference,
    normal weather reception should be as good everywhere since normal
    atmospheric attenuation is not that significant.

    Randy S.
  22. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    > >DirecTv gets better the farther South you live. It's GREAT in Houston.
    >
    > Better how? You either get the signal or you don't. A 50% signal
    strength
    > looks no different than a 100% signal strength.
    >
    > I happen to be in one of the farthest areas for reception, yet I still get
    > high 90's and a few 100%'s on just about every channel.

    Maybe on a nice sunny day they are the same. However, if is light storm
    comes in that would drop your signal strength 15-20%, then 50% and 100% are
    no longer the same thing. The stronger signal you have, the more adverse
    conditions you can face before losing your acceptable signal.

    When setting up your dish, don't just be happy if you've achieved a good
    enough signal. Spend a little time to maximize and get the best possible
    signal level. That will minimize your down times.

    Jim
  23. Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

    In article <U9vge.1052$bm5.620@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net>,
    "Scooby" <mmscooby1@removeme.earthlink.net> wrote:

    >
    > > >DirecTv gets better the farther South you live. It's GREAT in Houston.
    > >
    > > Better how? You either get the signal or you don't. A 50% signal
    > strength
    > > looks no different than a 100% signal strength.
    > >
    > > I happen to be in one of the farthest areas for reception, yet I still get
    > > high 90's and a few 100%'s on just about every channel.
    >
    > Maybe on a nice sunny day they are the same. However, if is light storm
    > comes in that would drop your signal strength 15-20%, then 50% and 100% are
    > no longer the same thing. The stronger signal you have, the more adverse
    > conditions you can face before losing your acceptable signal.
    >
    > When setting up your dish, don't just be happy if you've achieved a good
    > enough signal. Spend a little time to maximize and get the best possible
    > signal level. That will minimize your down times.

    Simple Geometry. If the bird is low in the sky to you because you live
    up in Seattle (for instance), you're looking through far more
    atmosphere, (and thus more susceptable to distant storms reducing
    reception) than if its high in the sky, as in South Texas.
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