High-end gaming system, future-proof

Hey everybody,
For the first time I am building a PC, I am trying to make myself a good setup for 1440p gaming and at the same time future/upgrading proof (maybe for 4k gaming).
I am not planning to overclock, that is why I chose the regular I5-6600, it doesn't have hyperthreading though, but will it still be good enough? Since I am not overclocking I think I don't really need a CPU cooler or do I?
I picked 16GB (2*8GB dual channel) memory, do you think this is overkill at the moment? Should I go with 8GB (1x8GB) for now and upgrade too 16GB later on?
So in the future I can buy another GPU and use crossfire with my existing GPU, well at least will there be enough space on my motherboard?
I know 750 is a bit overkill in this setup but I am looking at the future when I want to use 2 GPU's, I think 750 will be kind of necessary then?
I was thinking to maybe pick a 1TB HDD for now and add another later to reduce the costs, or should I just go with the 2TB right away?

Any input and other corrections to improve performance are very welcome.
Thank you very much in advance.

CPU: Intel Core i5-6600 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($215.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock H170 Pro4S ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory ($96.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 850 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($132.20 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.89 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: MSI Radeon R9 390X 8GB Video Card ($399.99 @ Micro Center)
Case: Fractal Design Define R5 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG CH12LS28 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer
Total: $1185.03
5 answers Last reply
More about high end gaming system future proof
  1. The i5 will not be a bottleneck in the forseeable future. I would ditch the stock cooler, though, and get something a little better. AN EVO 212 or equivalent. The stock coolers are marginal, even without overclocking. Although 8 Gb of RAM is plenty if all your doing is gaming right now, 16 Gb is still a good idea in regards to future proofing. Memory consumption has always historically increased. Doesn't look like that motherboard supports XFire, though. And if you think you might want to Xfire or SLI in the future, I would suggest a slightly larger PSU, something at ieast 850 watts, with 4 x 6+2 PCIe connectors. Heres another Asrock board with Xfire support:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157635&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-PCPartPicker,%20LLC-_-na-_-na-_-na&cm_sp=&AID=10446076&PID=3938566&SID=
  2. Anonymous said:
    kennieee said:

    I am not planning to overclock, that is why I chose the regular I5-6600, it doesn't have hyperthreading though, but will it still be good enough? Since I am not overclocking I think I don't really need a CPU cooler or do I?



    i find this particular sentence funny... you need a cooler,no matter what,but i get that you mean that you won't need a aftermarket cooler.though i suggest getting one just in case.

    storage depends on your games,is there a lot of games that you want to play? if not,just opt for 1 tb and upgrade later.
    btw, unless the board you pointed to here is not the same as whatever board you were choosing,you can't run crossfire,check it again,perhaps. there's no crossfire support. unless i'm wrong?

    oh,also,here's the board above,but in pcpartpicker's website
    https://pcpartpicker.com/part/asrock-motherboard-z170pro4


    When I check the website (http://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/H170%20Pro4S/) It says AMD Quad CrossFireX™ , so I thought it was Crossfire ready, unless I am wrong about it?
    The Z170pro4 is a bit more expensive so I might have to downgrade to 8GB RAM and a 1TB HDD for now and then I think I can also fit in another CPU cooler.

    Any other suggestions or improvements?
  3. You are correct. Asrocks website does show it as being XFire capable, PCPartPicker got it wrong. I would not change the SSD though. You could always add more storage later when you need it. If you need to make some room in your budget for a cooler, go for and 8 Gb kit of some cheaper RAM, say:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231886 or something similar from your mobo's compatibility list.
  4. BadActor said:
    You are correct. Asrocks website does show it as being XFire capable, PCPartPicker got it wrong. I would not change the SSD though. You could always add more storage later when you need it. If you need to make some room in your budget for a cooler, go for and 8 Gb kit of some cheaper RAM, say:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231886 or something similar from your mobo's compatibility list.


    Thanks for double checking, ok so I made a couple of edits and this is what it looks like now, think I'm good to go with this setup?

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-6600 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($224.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock H170 Pro4S ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($94.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 850 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($149.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($50.49 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: MSI Radeon R9 390X 8GB Video Card ($413.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Fractal Design Define R5 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: LG CH12LS28 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer
    Total: $1194.40
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-11-10 06:55 EST-0500
  5. Awesome! And on s side note, most people will be hard pressed to see any real difference between the 850 PRO and EVO in everyday use.
Ask a new question

Read More

Gaming Systems