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Have to get active HDMI/DVI-D to VGA converter, have 3 questions

I just got a new PC, and the GPU I picked didn't have a VGA port, so since my monitor is VGA only I have to get one of those active converters and I have two questions I'd like answers to:

1. I bought my PC for gaming, and I play a lot of FPS games, so speed really matters. Since these things have to convert my GPU's digital signal to analog before sending it to the screen, does this add any delay that is of any importance in gaming? I assume any delay will be in the ms range, but I'd like to know whether this makes any real difference or not.

2. Do these need any extra cables to receive power? If yes, what type, and do they come with one or should I get my own?

3. Not really important, but I noticed HDMI to VGA seems to be cheaper compared to DVI-D to VGA. Why is that?

Thanks a lot.
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  1. Best answer
    There certainly is a delay, but I've never noticed it nor heard anyone else complaining about it, so I doubt you'll run into trouble.

    They generally need extra power, but it's often just a USB plug or something small like that. It's not a high-power process.

    If the adapter is an older model, then the HDMI version also old like 1.0 such that DVI-D (while having the same signaling) could be dual-link and offers twice the bandwidth of HDMI. Newer versions of HDMI can circumvent this, but adapters tend to not use the most recent version of HDMI. This is my best guess about why HDMI adapters would be cheaper. If you're just going for say a 1080p display at regular 24b color, then you have nothing to worry about either way so long as the adapter says it supports your resolution or near it (if it says a 2K resolution like 2048x1536 then it's fine) at 60Hz and 24b color or better.
  2. blazorthon said:
    There certainly is a delay, but I've never noticed it nor heard anyone else complaining about it, so I doubt you'll run into trouble.

    They generally need extra power, but it's often just a USB plug or something small like that. It's not a high-power process.

    If the adapter is an older model, then the HDMI version also old like 1.0 such that DVI-D (while having the same signaling) could be dual-link and offers twice the bandwidth of HDMI. Newer versions of HDMI can circumvent this, but adapters tend to not use the most recent version of HDMI. This is my best guess about why HDMI adapters would be cheaper. If you're just going for say a 1080p display at regular 24b color, then you have nothing to worry about either way so long as the adapter says it supports your resolution or near it (if it says a 2K resolution like 2048x1536 then it's fine) at 60Hz and 24b color or better.


    Thanks for the answer. Just to clarify, when you say "a USB plug", do you mean like a USB to Micro-USB cable or something else?
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