Is this an alright PC? (link)

https://www.instar-informatika.hr/racunalo-instar-gamer-ultra-intel-core-i3-4170-370ghz-4gb-1000gb-nvidia-geforce-gtx1050-2gb-gddr5-dvd-rw-5-god-jamstvo/4170-ULT-HDD-1050-2/product/

I'm going to but a pre-built PC within my budget, and I've found one. But not an expert, though. Can this PC run things like GTA V or less demanding games like Skyrim, with a stable FPS on 1080 res with high graphics? I mean, those aren't my standards, I have a Intel HD Graphics Card right now, so even minimum graphics with a good fps count is good, but I just wanna know if It's the real deal...

Thanks, in advance!
Reply to thelux008
4 answers Last reply
More about alright link
  1. Not knowing the language, but 4gb is not good, freedos will not run your games; you need windows.
    the quality of the psu is not likely to be good.
    I3-4170 is good, but a GTX1050 is not going to rum anything with fast action.

    Nothing is a good deal if it will not do the job you need done.
    I would pass.
    Reply to geofelt
  2. Yeah, that is really scraping the bare minimum and probably actually dropping underneath it.

    Obviously it's going to have a better shot than integrated graphics, but it's not necessarily going to get the job done, as geofelt says.

    What's your budget and your region? You might be able to do better for your money. Alternatively you could look at picking up a second hand PC. I don't know what the second hand prices are like in your region, but I've often had success NOT looking at "gaming PCs" (which tend to be overpriced), but rather carefully choosing a decent base PC and then turning it into a gaming PC with a simple GPU (and sometimes PSU) upgrade.

    If that's not possible, depending on your budget, you might actually be better holding off and saving up a little more. When you're on a really tight budget, even small budget increases translate into massive performance differences and can add years to the effective life of the PC.
    Reply to rhysiam
  3. rhysiam said:
    Yeah, that is really scraping the bare minimum and probably actually dropping underneath it.

    Obviously it's going to have a better shot than integrated graphics, but it's not necessarily going to get the job done, as geofelt says.

    What's your budget and your region? You might be able to do better for your money. Alternatively you could look at picking up a second hand PC. I don't know what the second hand prices are like in your region, but I've often had success NOT looking at "gaming PCs" (which tend to be overpriced), but rather carefully choosing a decent base PC and then turning it into a gaming PC with a simple GPU (and sometimes PSU) upgrade.

    If that's not possible, depending on your budget, you might actually be better holding off and saving up a little more. When you're on a really tight budget, even small budget increases translate into massive performance differences and can add years to the effective life of the PC.


    Well, I appreciate your suggestion, but I was looking for prebuilt PC's because i want to purchase it by installment. I don't have a huge amount of money saved up. Wouldn't really work if I bought it second-hand.
    Reply to thelux008
  4. thelux008 said:
    Well, I appreciate your suggestion, but I was looking for prebuilt PC's because i want to purchase it by installment. I don't have a huge amount of money saved up. Wouldn't really work if I bought it second-hand.

    I hear what you're saying, if I understand you correctly, then you want to spend money over time with the ultimate goal of working towards a solid mid-range gaming PC. That's a good plan and makes perfect sense.

    Here's the problem though: that PC you're looking at has a 1050, a 3 generations old dual core processor, an ultra budget power supply and 4GB of RAM. There is almost nothing in that system that can be usefully built on or reused for your final goal of the solid mid-range gaming PC. That PC will require replacing all of the components I just listed (you could potentially reuse the RAM, but that's a tiny amount anyway). So you spend your entire budget on that PC, get something that barely does the job now and, critically, doesn't actually get you much closer at all to your final goal. That's the point I'm trying to make - and I'm pretty sure is basically what @geofelt was saying too.

    This is why I'm suggesting you look at second hand. Basically any Sandy Bridge quad core or later (i5 or i7 2xxx, 3xxx, 4xxx, 6xxx, 7xxx) system is still a really solid mid range gaming platform. Get that, and you have yourself a good base to work from. Maybe you can pick up one for your budget now with an old graphics card, like a GTX 760, R9 280X or something like that. Now out of the box that's going to be a low-medium gaming system, adequate, but not ideal. However, once you save up a little down the track, you can add a GTX 1060 or RX 480 (or whatever the modern equivalent is), ensure you have 8 or even 16GB of RAM, and all of a sudden you have the very capable mid-range gaming machine that'll play GTA V on high. Chuck an SSD in there and you'll have a lovely little machine.

    The plan above - as a hypothetical example - is a better way to work towards your goal. It really depends on what you can pick up in your budget in your region - which is why I asked for you budget and region.

    Anyway - naturally the choice is yours - but I would encourage to think about how you're going to get what you want in the long term, because unfortunately buying new at the very bottom end often gives you nothing to work from, and come upgrade time, you ultimately discover you need to upgrade everything, and thus start looking at new machines all over again. You get stuck in a bare-minimum gaming loop.
    Reply to rhysiam
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