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How to install Ubuntu on second Hdd without affecting Windows 10? no dual boot and no boot up menu.

How to install Ubuntu on second Hdd without affecting Windows 10? no dual boot and no boot up menu. I simply would like this as my set up windows 10 is on my main HDD 2tb drive is sata 1 I would like my pc to always boot directly into windows with no boot up menu like grub for example just straight into windows with ubuntu on my second HDD installed apart from windows where the only way to boot ubuntu is to go into the bios and select the boot medium as the drive with ubuntu on it otherwise the computer should display no signs of having ubuntu installed on it the only other hdd drive on the machine is a WD 320gb in sata 2 this is where i want to install ubuntu but nearly all i have tried so far ends up with a menu when i press the power but asking me wether to start windows or ubuntu this is the complete opposite of what i want i just want an ubuntu backup drive i can access when windows 10 shits out on me which it does frequently thank you microsoft for that but as you imagine im growing more and more infuriated by the fact that everything i have researched has had the same problem it ends in a dual boot scenario when all i am aiming for is a backup drive i can find no helpful information on this topic anywhere else on the internet that actually works except for "its possible, it can be done" and before its mentioned please no answers that would change or damage the windows 10 system in some manner i want the windows 10 disk to stay untouched in the matter
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  1. The concept being that when Windows 10 "fails" you can then apply Ubunto to provide some fix?

    I would think that you would put Ubunto on an external USB drive with USB being set as the first boot option.

    If not the external drive is not plugged in then the existing Windows 10 installation as the second boot drive would boot.

    On a failure, you plug in the Ubunto USB drive and restart the computer booting into Ubunto and then access the Windows 10 drive if and as necessary.

    As another though,t if you really intend to just use one OS or the other, then you might consider using a disk tray/caddy system. Just install the applicable Windows 10 or Ubunto caddy and boot. Neither OS will know about the other.
  2. Ralston18 said:
    The concept being that when Windows 10 "fails" you can then apply Ubunto to provide some fix?

    I would think that you would put Ubunto on an external USB drive with USB being set as the first boot option.

    If not the external drive is not plugged in then the existing Windows 10 installation as the second boot drive would boot.

    On a failure, you plug in the Ubunto USB drive and restart the computer booting into Ubunto and then access the Windows 10 drive if and as necessary.

    As another though,t if you really intend to just use one OS or the other, then you might consider using a disk tray/caddy system. Just install the applicable Windows 10 or Ubunto caddy and boot. Neither OS will know about the other.


    I am very sorry for the language i will keep in mind the nature of the forum and its rules on language in the future but there is something I question why is it that i cant just unplug the windows drive install ubuntu on the drive still plugged in and not end up with a boot menu i mean from my last question and what else i have heard this should be the solution but ive tried this and its not it still ends up with a boot menu and when it comes to making a bootable usb drive if i had a usb tumb drive i might consider that but i dont own one all i have are cd's dvd's and a spare hdd doing nothing which i am trying to use as a back up drive for when windows decides to be fickle as it is and not work for reasons unknown i still need a working pc but so far ive had no luck on getting the installation right it always ends up with boot menu and i cant figure out the devil why :(
  3. MERGED QUESTION
    Question from Steven_180 : "how to install Ubuntu COMPLETELY SEPARATE from windows 10"

    Steven_180 said:
    How do you install Ubuntu COMPLETELY SEPARATE from windows 10 ive tried installing it on a completely seperate HDD but this still ends up with dual booting the two systems where i have to select what OS i want to boot to when i start the PC I dont want to modify the windows 10 system in any way shape or form i just want i totally separated install of Ubuntu that only appears when i select to boot to the HDD it is installed on as if it was the only HDD the computer had im frustrated because no matter what tips i look up online they all end up being a dual boot scenario and im looking for the two systems to be totally separated from each other there should be no kind of start up menu where i have to pick booting into one or the other outside of changing the default boot medium in the bios


    maxwellmelon said:
    install the drive you want windows installed on only...install windows...unplug that drive and install ur drive for Linux.....install Linux.....when both setups are complete then plug both drives in...

    if your getting a boot menu after doing it this way then its your bios and not coming from the hard drive itself as as both drives would have there own MBR (master boot record) with no reference to the other os being on the other drive.


    Rocky Bennett said:
    What maxwellmelon said is absolutely 100% correct, and very easy to do as well.


    Steven_180 said:
    Very sad to report after having to reinstall Windows because i have no idea how to fix the Windows 10 bootloader or at the very least getting it back to what it was in the first place simply unplugging one drive and then installing one system and then doing the same for the other still ends up with the GRUB menu at start up asking which OS ? Why this is i have no idea but seeing as how this very solution was the first thing i tried and it didnt work but was told to do it again i thought why not go back and try it and try it carefully to make sure there is no strange mistakes from trying to do the process as quickly as i can and i can tell you from this being my second trip around with this very method this still ends up with a GRUB menu every time you start the computer any other solutions or ideas are very welcome but what has been stated so far definitely ends up with a superfluous starting menu


    Rocky Bennett said:
    I have done it hundreds of times on dozens of systems and it has worked flawlessly every time. In fact, I have performed this method on the computer that I am using right now at least 30 or 40 separate times and I have never seen a GRUB menu.

    There might be one thing that you are overlooking during the process. If you perform this process correctly you should never see a GRUB menu.
  4. I have a few linux OSes, tools, ISO live anti virus, and system testing boots on an external 500GB USB drive. No menu on boot and all I have to do is plug it in and enter boot menu on startup. Once I do that I get about 50 selections on a grub menu. Its portable so I can take to clients or friends to fix any system. Here is a windows tool to do all the setting up for you.
    https://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/
  5. Steven_180 said:
    Ralston18 said:
    The concept being that when Windows 10 "fails" you can then apply Ubunto to provide some fix?

    I would think that you would put Ubunto on an external USB drive with USB being set as the first boot option.

    If not the external drive is not plugged in then the existing Windows 10 installation as the second boot drive would boot.

    On a failure, you plug in the Ubunto USB drive and restart the computer booting into Ubunto and then access the Windows 10 drive if and as necessary.

    As another though,t if you really intend to just use one OS or the other, then you might consider using a disk tray/caddy system. Just install the applicable Windows 10 or Ubunto caddy and boot. Neither OS will know about the other.


    I am very sorry for the language i will keep in mind the nature of the forum and its rules on language in the future but there is something I question why is it that i cant just unplug the windows drive install ubuntu on the drive still plugged in and not end up with a boot menu i mean from my last question and what else i have heard this should be the solution but ive tried this and its not it still ends up with a boot menu and when it comes to making a bootable usb drive if i had a usb tumb drive i might consider that but i dont own one all i have are cd's dvd's and a spare hdd doing nothing which i am trying to use as a back up drive for when windows decides to be fickle as it is and not work for reasons unknown i still need a working pc but so far ive had no luck on getting the installation right it always ends up with boot menu and i cant figure out the devil why :(



    At what point do you see a boot menu? What is listed in the boot menu? Do you have a fresh image of a Linux OS that you can use? How many hard drives, internal and external, are connected to this PC?
  6. Rocky Bennett said:
    Steven_180 said:
    Ralston18 said:
    The concept being that when Windows 10 "fails" you can then apply Ubunto to provide some fix?

    I would think that you would put Ubunto on an external USB drive with USB being set as the first boot option.

    If not the external drive is not plugged in then the existing Windows 10 installation as the second boot drive would boot.

    On a failure, you plug in the Ubunto USB drive and restart the computer booting into Ubunto and then access the Windows 10 drive if and as necessary.

    As another though,t if you really intend to just use one OS or the other, then you might consider using a disk tray/caddy system. Just install the applicable Windows 10 or Ubunto caddy and boot. Neither OS will know about the other.


    I am very sorry for the language i will keep in mind the nature of the forum and its rules on language in the future but there is something I question why is it that i cant just unplug the windows drive install ubuntu on the drive still plugged in and not end up with a boot menu i mean from my last question and what else i have heard this should be the solution but ive tried this and its not it still ends up with a boot menu and when it comes to making a bootable usb drive if i had a usb tumb drive i might consider that but i dont own one all i have are cd's dvd's and a spare hdd doing nothing which i am trying to use as a back up drive for when windows decides to be fickle as it is and not work for reasons unknown i still need a working pc but so far ive had no luck on getting the installation right it always ends up with boot menu and i cant figure out the devil why :(



    At what point do you see a boot menu? What is listed in the boot menu? Do you have a fresh image of a Linux OS that you can use? How many hard drives, internal and external, are connected to this PC?


    I see Grub as soon as I press the power button or within shortly there after asking Windows or Ubuntu ? I have a Ubuntu dvd -r freshly burned with ImgBurn at X8 speed I have one 2tb hdd for Windows 10 and one 320gb WD hdd for Ubuntu and one final sata cable going to cd/dvd drive upon further inspection sata0 is 2tb drive then sata1 is cd/dvd drive and sata2 is WD drive(installed by me becase i wanted a backup OS should windows fail and become unbootable as it frequently does for no reason) keep in mind this pc was assembled prebuilt from HP and bought at an HP outlet brand new as an HP Envy Desktop with cor i7 , 16gb ram, nvidia geforce GTX 745 other than what i have mentioned the only other things connected to the pc are hdmi to display and wireless usb mouse/keyboard combo and wireless headset usb adapters
  7. Rocky Bennett said:
    Steven_180 said:
    Ralston18 said:
    The concept being that when Windows 10 "fails" you can then apply Ubunto to provide some fix?

    I would think that you would put Ubunto on an external USB drive with USB being set as the first boot option.

    If not the external drive is not plugged in then the existing Windows 10 installation as the second boot drive would boot.

    On a failure, you plug in the Ubunto USB drive and restart the computer booting into Ubunto and then access the Windows 10 drive if and as necessary.

    As another though,t if you really intend to just use one OS or the other, then you might consider using a disk tray/caddy system. Just install the applicable Windows 10 or Ubunto caddy and boot. Neither OS will know about the other.


    I am very sorry for the language i will keep in mind the nature of the forum and its rules on language in the future but there is something I question why is it that i cant just unplug the windows drive install ubuntu on the drive still plugged in and not end up with a boot menu i mean from my last question and what else i have heard this should be the solution but ive tried this and its not it still ends up with a boot menu and when it comes to making a bootable usb drive if i had a usb tumb drive i might consider that but i dont own one all i have are cd's dvd's and a spare hdd doing nothing which i am trying to use as a back up drive for when windows decides to be fickle as it is and not work for reasons unknown i still need a working pc but so far ive had no luck on getting the installation right it always ends up with boot menu and i cant figure out the devil why :(



    At what point do you see a boot menu? What is listed in the boot menu? Do you have a fresh image of a Linux OS that you can use? How many hard drives, internal and external, are connected to this PC?


    I see Grub as soon as I press the power button or within shortly there after asking Windows or Ubuntu ? I have a Ubuntu dvd -r freshly burned with ImgBurn at X8 speed I have one 2tb hdd for Windows 10 and one 320gb WD hdd for Ubuntu and one final sata cable going to cd/dvd drive upon further inspection sata0 is 2tb drive then sata1 is cd/dvd drive and sata2 is WD drive(installed by me becase i wanted a backup OS should windows fail and become unbootable as it frequently does for no reason) keep in mind this pc was assembled prebuilt from HP and bought at an HP outlet brand new as an HP Envy Desktop with cor i7 , 16gb ram, nvidia geforce GTX 745 other than what i have mentioned the only other things connected to the pc are hdmi to display and wireless usb mouse/keyboard combo and wireless headset usb adapters
  8. Might be viable for you to set up a virtual machine on a second drive.

    E.g. the following links:

    https://www.lifewire.com/install-ubuntu-linux-windows-10-steps-2202108

    https://dirkstrauss.com/moving-virtualbox-vm/
  9. Ralston18 said:
    Might be viable for you to set up a virtual machine on a second drive.

    E.g. the following links:

    https://www.lifewire.com/install-ubuntu-linux-windows-10-steps-2202108

    https://dirkstrauss.com/moving-virtualbox-vm/


    A virtual machine is inaccessible without the host OS to run virtualbox in the first place im looking to have a back up OS should windows crash and decide not to boot which it does frequently i would just switch to Ubuntu if it wasnt for the fact i use programs not emulate-able in Wine I mean really this should not be as difficult as this is i just want the Ubuntu installation to live on its own HDD and that drive only without any Grub boot menu when i press the power on button on my pc the only way my pc should boot into Ubuntu is by changing the boot medium in bios to the WD drive the installation wiill live on and then if i see a grub menu with Ubuntu and its own options then thats more than fine i just want the pc to boot straight into windows without any superfluous unneeded ugly menus like Grub when i power the tower on why cant i just make grub live on its own HDD and leave the Windows 10 drive and its boot up procedure alone unless that drive is selected for boot up by the bios
  10. Best answer
    Leaving my comfort zone somewhat - maybe even more than somewhat...

    So if Windows fails as you describe and you restart your PC you are willing to "F2", "F10", or otherwise press the necessary key to go into BIOS and change the boot drive to Ubuntu installed drive - correct?

    Otherwise, as another option, maybe boot into Ubuntu and if you "do nothing" then Windows is loaded.

    Again out of my comfort zone but will provide the following link:

    https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2336099

    Seems to address some of issues involved.

    Wondering if your post might get more exposure in another category "Open Source Software" perhaps.

    Maybe one of the moderators can advise accordingly.
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