Building a new PC (2000$), need help picking out parts.

Hey

I'm looking to build a new PC for roughly 2000$ max,

I want to be able to editing raw 4K footage, playing most games (mostly H1Z1) above 75fps at HIGH settings.

I also want to have fast read/writes speeds.

Don't include hard drives in the prices. SSD and M.2 SSD only.

Doesn't matter if its Intel or AMD, same applies to the GPU Nvidia or AMD is fine.

Thank you
11 answers Last reply
More about building 2000 picking parts
  1. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($289.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock - X370 Taichi ATX AM4 Motherboard ($155.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($336.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($117.60 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 1TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($327.89 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card ($532.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Phanteks - ECLIPSE P400S TEMPERED GLASS ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($88.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $1920.42
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-16 06:18 EDT-0400
  2. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($289.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Scythe FUMA Rev.B CPU Cooler (SCFM-1100) ($45.99 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: ASRock - X370 GAMING X ATX AM4 Motherboard ($111.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($295.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: MyDigitalSSD - BPX 512GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: WD Blue 3D NAND 1TB PC SSD - SATA III 6 Gb/s 2.5"/7mm Solid State Drive - WDS100T2B0A ($299.97 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card ($532.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Silverstone - Redline RL06BR-PRO ATX Mid Tower Case ($82.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.89 @ Newegg)
    Total: $1927.77
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-16 06:23 EDT-0400

    8 cores Ryzen 7 for rendering, Scythe Fuma for keeping the temperatures in check, 32GB DDR4.

    MydigitalSSD BPX for better price-to-performance than 960 Evo. WD Blue 3D NAND, Toms Hardware Editor Choice award SSD, that can outperform the 850 Pro in heavy workload.

    From Toms' Review:
    Quote:
    The new Blue 3D and Ultra 3D stand out from the group of the best TLC-based SSDs. The drives even outperform the 850 Pro 1TB in the sequential steady-state test. Samsung designed the Pro series to address this type of workload.

    Quote:
    The new BiCS SSDs obliterate the 850 EVO 1TB when they recover from a heavy workload. It's notable that the 1TB EVO is the slowest in this test compared to the other 850 EVO capacities, largely because the SSD takes longer to recover. This is actually a second-generation 850 EVO 1TB model with 48-layer V-NAND, but the drive originally came to market with 32-layer V-NAND. Samsung changed the flash to decrease costs.


    Silverstone RL06 case for strong airflow as the NVME SSD runs quite a bit hotter than their SATA counterparts.
  3. @FD2Raptor & @Finstar

    Thank you for your reply! I really appreciate it!

    I decided to take both of your builds and switch a few things around. Let me know what you guys think!


    PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/tmpZVY
    Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/tmpZVY/by_merchant/

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($289.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterLiquid 240 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock - X370 Taichi ATX AM4 Motherboard ($155.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($295.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: MyDigitalSSD - BPX 512GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Crucial - MX300 1.1TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($270.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card ($532.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Silverstone - Redline RL06BR-PRO ATX Mid Tower Case ($82.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.89 @ Newegg)
    Total: $1961.79
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-16 10:14 EDT-0400
  4. Don't swap from the new WD 3D NAND to 1st gen Crucial MX300; for your video editing workload, that could cut performance by 30%.



    To quote how Toms test SSD:
    Quote:
    There are some instances when steady state performance data is more relevant, such as prosumer workloads. Sequential mixed workload steady state testing shows us how a drive behaves after heavy multimedia editing on a secondary drive.
  5. You don't need an AIO for the 1700 unless you plan on doing some extreme overclocking. The stock cooler is fine for modest overclocks.
  6. Good to know @FD2Raptor thank you!

    I do plan on doing some over clocking, I’ve seen test that the 1700 @4Ghz runs fast then a stock 1800x which is something that caught my eye since I original was just going to purchase the 1800x @Finstar


    So this is my final build here

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($289.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterLiquid 240 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock - X370 Taichi ATX AM4 Motherboard ($155.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($295.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: MyDigitalSSD - BPX 512GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card ($532.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Silverstone - Redline RL06BR-PRO ATX Mid Tower Case ($82.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.89 @ Newegg)
    Other: WD Blue 3D NAND 1TB PC SSD - SATA III 6 Gb/s 2.5"/7mm Solid State Drive - WDS100T2B0A ($299.97 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1990.77
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-16 16:19 EDT-0400


    Good?
  7. Finstar said:
    You don't need an AIO for the 1700 unless you plan on doing some extreme overclocking. The stock cooler is fine for modest overclocks.


    Good to know @FD2Raptor thank you!

    I do plan on doing some over clocking, I’ve seen test that the 1700 @4Ghz runs fast then a stock 1800x which is something that caught my eye since I original was just going to purchase the 1800x @Finstar


    So this is my final build here

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($289.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterLiquid 240 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock - X370 Taichi ATX AM4 Motherboard ($155.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($295.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: MyDigitalSSD - BPX 512GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card ($532.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Silverstone - Redline RL06BR-PRO ATX Mid Tower Case ($82.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.89 @ Newegg)
    Other: WD Blue 3D NAND 1TB PC SSD - SATA III 6 Gb/s 2.5"/7mm Solid State Drive - WDS100T2B0A ($299.97 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1990.77
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-16 16:19 EDT-0400


    Good?
  8. FD2Raptor said:
    Don't swap from the new WD 3D NAND to 1st gen Crucial MX300; for your video editing workload, that could cut performance by 30%.



    To quote how Toms test SSD:
    Quote:
    There are some instances when steady state performance data is more relevant, such as prosumer workloads. Sequential mixed workload steady state testing shows us how a drive behaves after heavy multimedia editing on a secondary drive.


    Good to know @FD2Raptor thank you!

    I do plan on doing some over clocking, I’ve seen test that the 1700 @4Ghz runs fast then a stock 1800x which is something that caught my eye since I original was just going to purchase the 1800x @Finstar


    So this is my final build here

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($289.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterLiquid 240 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock - X370 Taichi ATX AM4 Motherboard ($155.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($295.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: MyDigitalSSD - BPX 512GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card ($532.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Silverstone - Redline RL06BR-PRO ATX Mid Tower Case ($82.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.89 @ Newegg)
    Other: WD Blue 3D NAND 1TB PC SSD - SATA III 6 Gb/s 2.5"/7mm Solid State Drive - WDS100T2B0A ($299.97 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1990.77
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-16 16:19 EDT-0400


    Good?
  9. I'd say you'll do just fine with the Scythe Fuma. The ~$100 MasterLiquid 240 Pro with better fans and pump, compare to the normal MasterLiquid 240, only barely manage to beat the Fuma by 2 degrees; similar story with the other humongous tower like Noctua D15/Cryorig R1, only 2-3 degrees.

    In term of price to performance, it is unrivaled, seeing that it'd take a high end ~$120+ MSRP AIO to get ~4-5°C more or a custom loop liquid cooling setup in the few hundred dollars to truly beat the Fuma. It's not by random chance that it's the Tom's Hardware Editor Recommended, Tech Power Up Editor Recommended, HardOCP's Gold Award cooler.

    Tech PowerUp:
    Quote:
    It's not very often an entry level cooler impresses me as much as the Scythe Fuma has. It offers exceptional performance. To put it into perspective, in the FPU load tests on the overclocked 6700K, it's just 2°C behind the Noctua NH-D15. Offering performance so close to Noctua's flagship is nothing to scoff at. Even more amazing is that it does so with roughly the same noise profile, making the Scythe Fuma a fearsome offering in that it doesn't sacrifice a low-noise operation for its exceptional price-to-performance ratio.
    ...
    Overall, the Scythe Fuma is an exceptionally quiet dual-tower CPU cooler that, while not jaw-dropping or head-turning, performs so well it is impossible to ignore. Giving top-tier performance with budget friendly pricing, the Fuma is definitely worth a look.


    HardOCP:
    Quote:
    Scythe has a real winner on its hands with the FUMA. It killed it in our testing phases as long as you’re looking to overclock. Stock CPU users need not apply. The performance of the FUMA rivals many of the bigger water coolers in addition to demolishing the smaller All-In-Ones. If you like your coolers with a sprinkle of quietness then the FUMA has you covered there as well.
    ...
    The Bottom Line

    The Scythe FUMA is simply the most amazing air cooled heat sink I have ever tested. Scythe took a questionable design and made it work on every level. The cooling performance is the best ever tested from an air cooler and it does this while making minimal noise.

    For amazing performance in our temperature and sound tests all while being priced frugally, I am happy to award the Scythe FUMA the highest award; the [H]ardOCP GOLD Award.


    Toms Hardware:
    Quote:
    I don’t give out many Editor Recommended awards in CPU cooling, because I feel that most enthusiast market CPU coolers are overpriced. Scythe proved to be the fairly priced exception, with its sub-$50 cooler producing an excellent range of cooling at moderate to ultra-low noise levels.
    ...
    VERDICT
    Great cooling capacity, low noise capability, and a moderate price make Scythe’s Fuma our top value choice among dual-fan, dual-tower, big-air CPU coolers.


    If you'd like liquid cooling then the recommended AIO is the Fractal Design Celsius S24 or S36 and the case more suitable for liquid cooling is the Phanteks Enthoo Pro M, available in full sized Acrylic or Tempered Glass window.
  10. You need to mention too that he will need to order an AM4 bracket seperately from Scythe to make it fit the socket.
  11. Nope. The Rev B of the Mugen 5 and Fuma (SCFM-1100 and SCMG-5100) is the updated package with the AM4 bracket already included. It's the old SCFM-1000 and SCMG-5000 package that come without that bracket.
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