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Planning on upgrading MOBO, can I use my windows 7 disc after installing the new MOBO to do any potential system repairs?

As the title says, I'm planning on upgrading to a new MOBO as I have just purchased a new CPU that is not compatible with my current MOBO. I was hoping to simply swap out the MOBO and any other incompatible parts while still using my same installation of windows. Right now I have windows 10 installed on my computer, but the original installation disc is of windows 7 since I did the free win10 upgrade. So my question is, if any problems arise with the OS/drivers/etc. after I change over to the new components, will I be able to use the win7 disc to do any system repairs if needed? Thanks.

Also as a side question, can I simply replace the components and expect it to boot, or are there a number of things I need to do beforehand?
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about planning upgrading mobo windows disc installing mobo potential system repairs
  1. Depending how severe changes was. I guess do full backup and try.
    90% it wont boot without repair, but If windows repair will help I must say I HAVE NO IDEA
  2. If you change the motherboard, Windows will de-activate because it registers to it.

    If the CD you have is an OEM Windows version, most likely you will not be able to activate it using the new motherboard.
  3. DarkEvonik said:
    If you change the motherboard, Windows will de-activate because it registers to it.

    If the CD you have is an OEM Windows version, most likely you will not be able to activate it using the new motherboard.


    You know, I thought when I bought the CD it wasn't OEM, but I just looked at the disc case and it says it is OEM. So am I going to have to buy a new license?
  4. Is win 10 activated now? If so, go here and follow steps so you can move win 10 licence - Reactivating win 10 on new hardware

    download the Windows 10 media creation tool and use it to make a win 10 installer on USB

    Your best bet is to do a fresh install on new motherboard, it makes sure all the old drivers aren't there anymore. Copy anything off C drive you want to keep now. If you have 2 hdd, the install won't touch the 2nd one so can put all files there for now.

    boot from installer
    follow this guide: http://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/1950-windows-10-clean-install.html

    when you reach the screen asking for licence, click "I don't have a key" and win 10 will continue to install and once its complete, do the 2nd part of the reactivating win 10 on new hardware part

    On the screen where you choose where to install win 10, if it gives you an error about GPT drives, delete all the partitions on the hdd and press next. If it still gives error, cancel out of the installer and restart PC and start installer again, it will accept next on that screen this time (some PC just need a restart here)
  5. andythefoot said:
    DarkEvonik said:
    If you change the motherboard, Windows will de-activate because it registers to it.

    If the CD you have is an OEM Windows version, most likely you will not be able to activate it using the new motherboard.


    You know, I thought when I bought the CD it wasn't OEM, but I just looked at the disc case and it says it is OEM. So am I going to have to buy a new license?


    Most likely yes, but you should give it a try anyways.

    Microsoft is really bad at dealing with hardware changes, I believe there is a system builder version that won't deactivate with different hardware, you should look into that.
  6. DarkEvonik said:
    andythefoot said:
    DarkEvonik said:
    If you change the motherboard, Windows will de-activate because it registers to it.

    If the CD you have is an OEM Windows version, most likely you will not be able to activate it using the new motherboard.


    You know, I thought when I bought the CD it wasn't OEM, but I just looked at the disc case and it says it is OEM. So am I going to have to buy a new license?


    Most likely yes, but you should give it a try anyways.

    Microsoft is really bad at dealing with hardware changes, I believe there is a system builder version that won't deactivate with different hardware, you should look into that.



    You don't need to do this, every PC that was upgraded to win 10 from 7 or 8 can move the licence using the link I provided in 1st post I made... Reactivating win 10 on new hardware - if you follow these steps to either a) make sure licence is linked to an email address, or B) link to one if it isn't, you will be able to use the licence on the new motherboard.. You don't need a special version, the media creation tool version works.

    All you do is install it and when it asks for a key, click "I don't have a key" and win 10 will install and then once its finished, you do a second part of the above link to attach the new PC to the email address. Windows will activate then
  7. DarkEvonik said:
    If you change the motherboard, Windows will de-activate because it registers to it.

    If the CD you have is an OEM Windows version, most likely you will not be able to activate it using the new motherboard.


    Windows 10, after the Anniversary release in August 2016, has significantly changed the rules.
    Read and do this before you change any parts:
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3164428/windows-build-1607-activation.html
  8. Best answer
    andythefoot said:
    As the title says, I'm planning on upgrading to a new MOBO as I have just purchased a new CPU that is not compatible with my current MOBO. I was hoping to simply swap out the MOBO and any other incompatible parts while still using my same installation of windows. Right now I have windows 10 installed on my computer, but the original installation disc is of windows 7 since I did the free win10 upgrade. So my question is, if any problems arise with the OS/drivers/etc. after I change over to the new components, will I be able to use the win7 disc to do any system repairs if needed? Thanks.

    Also as a side question, can I simply replace the components and expect it to boot, or are there a number of things I need to do beforehand?


    Create your own Win 10 DVD or USB here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10


    With an all new motherboard, etc, be prepared to do a full reinstall.
    It may not be needed, but prepare for if it does.

    And again:
    Read and do this before you change any parts:
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3164428/windows-build-1607-activation.html
  9. USAFRet said:
    andythefoot said:
    As the title says, I'm planning on upgrading to a new MOBO as I have just purchased a new CPU that is not compatible with my current MOBO. I was hoping to simply swap out the MOBO and any other incompatible parts while still using my same installation of windows. Right now I have windows 10 installed on my computer, but the original installation disc is of windows 7 since I did the free win10 upgrade. So my question is, if any problems arise with the OS/drivers/etc. after I change over to the new components, will I be able to use the win7 disc to do any system repairs if needed? Thanks.

    Also as a side question, can I simply replace the components and expect it to boot, or are there a number of things I need to do beforehand?


    Create your own Win 10 DVD or USB here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10


    With an all new motherboard, etc, be prepared to do a full reinstall.
    It may not be needed, but prepare for if it does.

    And again:
    Read and do this before you change any parts:
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3164428/windows-build-1607-activation.html



    Thanks for the info. Appreciate it.
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