ABIT AI7 - Pentium®4 - 2.6GHz - Overclocking advice :)

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

Hi,

I'm just going through my last *stability* tests, and would like to begin
testing the overclocking aspects of my new rig.

I wanted to get the machine *Rock-Solid* using stock settings, now I got a
solid base to work from on my overclocking!

Intel® Pentium® 4 - 2.6GHz
Intel® Retail HSF
ABIT AI7 (BIOS #16)
512MB CORSAIR PC3200 (on Loan)
ANTEC TRUE550

I also have a THERMALRIGHT SP-94 + 92mm YS-TECH on standby, but I wanna see
what I can do with the retail unit first.

What would you say is the standard procedure for testing your CPU and mobo's
FSB?. I know I should take the memory out the equation by setting loose
timings, and also running the 5:4 divider, but what about the CPU?.

This is my first attempt at overclocking a Intel® P4, so I wanna take it all
in. Do you guys say just push up the FSB like 5MHz at a time, and then try
to boot up and run some Prime95, then if you fail that, nudge up the vCore a
bit?.

I read some reports of people running great overclocks using stock vCore
(1.525v). I don't expect that myself, but I have been reading that up to
1.65v is fairly safe, as long as proper cooling is in place.

So is that what I should do, relax the memory and start pushing 5MHz at a
time, then if I hit problems just bump up the vCore?
--
Wayne ][
<Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
23 answers Last reply
More about abit ai7 pentium 6ghz overclocking advice
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    I have almost the same setup, AI7 (BIOS 16), P4 2.6C (800MHz), 1GB Kingston
    PC3200, Coolermaster Aero 4 (copper, 2800RPM, very quiet), currently running
    218MHz (1:1).

    Be forewarned, the AI7 is a fine mobo, but the OC'ing ability of this
    particular mobo has proven to be inconsistent, more than I can recall w/ any
    other Abit mobo. It seems either you get a GREAT mobo (insane OCs to 250,
    260, or more), or mediocre results (230, if you're lucky). Unfortunately,
    I'm with many others in the latter category, the system simply will not run
    stable above 218MHz sync. I can just barely run 230MHz FSB w/ 5:4 without
    XP hanging on boot-up, so it's not the memory. And believe me, I'm VERY
    experienced and worked on this mobo for TWO MONTHS, to the point of
    exhaustion, it just won't do it. So just beware, keep your fingers crosses.

    As I said, I can't run the CPU FSB above 230Mhz, and can't run the memory
    past 218MHz. So that leaves me little choice, either run CPU FSB 230MHz
    (5:4), and thus seriously underclock the memory, or run 218MHz (1:1) and
    sacrifice some CPU OC'ing to keep the memory tapped out, and sync'd. Not a
    great situation, my only option being to get some PC4000 perhaps. But at
    today's prices, and given I don't think I'll being seeing anything more than
    CPU FSB 230MHz anyway, I decided to stay put. I was *hoping* to run CPU FSB
    250 (5:4), apparently this is a pipe-dream. Even tried water cooling, no
    dice. Yet others run the mobo 250 and up, I'm stumped.

    Since the P4 CPU is far more likely to be overclockable, I like to isolate
    the memory by overclocking the CPU FSB and memory in sync (1:1). IOW, try
    running 210, 220, 230, etc. In most cases, you'll tap out memory before the
    CPU (for me, that was 220MHz). I determined this using Memtest-86, NOT
    Windows. Windows is too demanding, takes to long to reboot, etc. And just
    because Memtest-86 runs clean, doesn't mean Windows will. Many attempts to
    OC in Memtest-86 ran fine, then hung Windows within seconds.

    I usually keep the memory at SPD until I tap it out, then start losening the
    timings, to see how much more I can gain. At that point, that's my upper
    memory limit. I then return to the SPD settings, then start tightening the
    timings, again, until it becomes unstable under Memtest-86, that's my lower
    limit. When completed, I have a low/high range for the memory. Of course,
    during this process, I'm adjusting vDimm to see if it helps, within reason,
    as necessary.

    Now I turn to the CPU. In this case, I suggest runnung 5:4 so that memory
    now doesn't hinder the results (i.e., it's always underclocked, at least
    until CPU FSB 250MHz). As with memory, I'm increasing voltage within
    reason, as necessary when instability occurs.

    Again, all this is under Memtest-86. When completed, I have a pretty good
    idea what the the CPU and memory can do, individually. I now try running
    Windows, which invariably can't handle the maximum OC under Memtest. I
    start working backwards, reducing CPU and memory OC's until Windows
    stability returns. Once Windows loads and run (or appears to run) stable, I
    run Prime95. Ultimately, I never accept OC'ing results until Prime95 runs
    24 hours, no errors.

    I strongly suggest keeping a diary, it really helps. You're adjusting a lot
    of variables, and it can get awfully difficult to keep track. The last
    thing you want to do is spend two hours mucking w/ the system, then lose
    track of where you are. List all the variable (FSB, memory, voltages,
    etc.), I even track memtest wall time to see if perhaps the OC is higher,
    but results are deminishing (sometimes happens on asynch CPU/DRAM ratio!).

    HTH

    Jim


    "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:407b2a4d$1_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm just going through my last *stability* tests, and would like to begin
    > testing the overclocking aspects of my new rig.
    >
    > I wanted to get the machine *Rock-Solid* using stock settings, now I got a
    > solid base to work from on my overclocking!
    >
    > Intel® Pentium® 4 - 2.6GHz
    > Intel® Retail HSF
    > ABIT AI7 (BIOS #16)
    > 512MB CORSAIR PC3200 (on Loan)
    > ANTEC TRUE550
    >
    > I also have a THERMALRIGHT SP-94 + 92mm YS-TECH on standby, but I wanna
    see
    > what I can do with the retail unit first.
    >
    > What would you say is the standard procedure for testing your CPU and
    mobo's
    > FSB?. I know I should take the memory out the equation by setting loose
    > timings, and also running the 5:4 divider, but what about the CPU?.
    >
    > This is my first attempt at overclocking a Intel® P4, so I wanna take it
    all
    > in. Do you guys say just push up the FSB like 5MHz at a time, and then
    try
    > to boot up and run some Prime95, then if you fail that, nudge up the vCore
    a
    > bit?.
    >
    > I read some reports of people running great overclocks using stock vCore
    > (1.525v). I don't expect that myself, but I have been reading that up to
    > 1.65v is fairly safe, as long as proper cooling is in place.
    >
    > So is that what I should do, relax the memory and start pushing 5MHz at a
    > time, then if I hit problems just bump up the vCore?
    > --
    > Wayne ][
    > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    "Jim" wrote
    > I have almost the same setup, AI7 (BIOS 16), P4 2.6C (800MHz), 1GB
    Kingston
    > PC3200, Coolermaster Aero 4 (copper, 2800RPM, very quiet), currently
    running
    > 218MHz (1:1).


    Hi Jim,
    thanks for that detailed reply, I found it very useful! Obviously I'm not
    sure what to expect, but I was kinda hoping to reach 250MHz-FSB with a 5:4
    memory ratio, but I guess that depends on whether the CPU or Mobo can handle
    those figures.

    Reading your story it sounds like your CPU may be in question. If only you
    had a different P4 to test, or some different RAM.

    I finally got my rig *Bullet-Proof* (12Hours Prime95 + 3DMark01) using stock
    settings. Had a nightmare trying to run some brand-new OCZ Platinum PC3200
    Limited-Edition at any decent timings, took me 8 days of ranting/testing to
    finally see it wasn't gonna happen, and sent the memory back for testing and
    *loaned* a stick of nice Corsair.

    Anyway I figure that I will set the memory to 5:4, then bump up the FSB by
    10MHz a time to 230MHz, then slowly begin pushing from there.

    I too had doubts about the AI7, but actually I am beginning to like it now.
    .. .my first Pentium board since my trusty BE6-II v1.1. I been chatting to a
    guy called *Navig* over in the ABIT forums, and he running his AI7 at
    300MHz-FSB with a P4c 2.4GHz.

    Also I'm aware of something that happens on different ABIT systems that I
    have built. Basically if you are trying to work your way upwards in an
    overclock (CPU/FSB whatever) you will get to a stage which you cannot pass,
    and will need to *leap-frog*. The last time I had this was with working on
    a recent AMD build using an AN7. I was trying to test out a T-Bred XP2400+
    CPU on a 200MHz-FSB BUS (10x200), this CPU normally uses a 133MHz BUS
    (15x133). Anyway no matter what I tried it just wouldn't boot at 10x200=
    2GHz which was the CPU's default GHz, so after some head-scratching I
    thought Sod-it, lets try higher and changed the settings to 11x200 (2.2GHz)
    and wouldn't you know it the PC booted and was stable. This scenario will
    catch out people like me who like to work their way *linearly* upwards, but
    sometimes you just need to skip this patch and resume on the other side.

    In the case of the AMD system, I was able to get that chip up to 2.4GHz
    stable using nearly 1.9vCore, but temps were a bit too much for the retail
    HSF :P

    Anyway I hope what I said made some sense, and I will let you know how I get
    on. . .
    --
    Wayne ][
    <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    I usually start by bouncing the FSB up a fair chunk without getting greedy
    just to get the first "chunk" out of the way. from there, I increment by 2
    Mhz until I find instability and back off a bit.

    at this stage, you have to decide what your approach is going to be...
    upping the voltage to the CPU and continuing forward or what...

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 130,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^


    "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:407b2a4d$1_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm just going through my last *stability* tests, and would like to begin
    > testing the overclocking aspects of my new rig.
    >
    > I wanted to get the machine *Rock-Solid* using stock settings, now I got a
    > solid base to work from on my overclocking!
    >
    > Intel® Pentium® 4 - 2.6GHz
    > Intel® Retail HSF
    > ABIT AI7 (BIOS #16)
    > 512MB CORSAIR PC3200 (on Loan)
    > ANTEC TRUE550
    >
    > I also have a THERMALRIGHT SP-94 + 92mm YS-TECH on standby, but I wanna
    see
    > what I can do with the retail unit first.
    >
    > What would you say is the standard procedure for testing your CPU and
    mobo's
    > FSB?. I know I should take the memory out the equation by setting loose
    > timings, and also running the 5:4 divider, but what about the CPU?.
    >
    > This is my first attempt at overclocking a Intel® P4, so I wanna take it
    all
    > in. Do you guys say just push up the FSB like 5MHz at a time, and then
    try
    > to boot up and run some Prime95, then if you fail that, nudge up the vCore
    a
    > bit?.
    >
    > I read some reports of people running great overclocks using stock vCore
    > (1.525v). I don't expect that myself, but I have been reading that up to
    > 1.65v is fairly safe, as long as proper cooling is in place.
    >
    > So is that what I should do, relax the memory and start pushing 5MHz at a
    > time, then if I hit problems just bump up the vCore?
    > --
    > Wayne ][
    > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    "TomG" wrote
    > I usually start by bouncing the FSB up a fair chunk without getting greedy
    > just to get the first "chunk" out of the way. from there, I increment by
    2
    > Mhz until I find instability and back off a bit.
    >
    > at this stage, you have to decide what your approach is going to be...
    > upping the voltage to the CPU and continuing forward or what...


    Hi Tom,
    thanks for reply, I promise not to bite your head off today :P

    One thing I was wondering, how can you separate your CPU and FSB when you
    start to hit errors?

    I can adjust vCore if I think my CPU is getting a bit ragged, but what can I
    do if I suspect my boards FSB is getting wobbly? is there anyway to adjust
    northbridge voltages? or any other tools to help stabilize a overclocked
    system bus?

    thanks as always
    --
    Wayne ][
    <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    not sure I agree that your ram is not the limiting factor, even at 5:4

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 130,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^


    "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message news:ZHJec.1290$Yf6.377@fed1read07...
    > I have almost the same setup, AI7 (BIOS 16), P4 2.6C (800MHz), 1GB
    Kingston
    > PC3200, Coolermaster Aero 4 (copper, 2800RPM, very quiet), currently
    running
    > 218MHz (1:1).
    >
    > Be forewarned, the AI7 is a fine mobo, but the OC'ing ability of this
    > particular mobo has proven to be inconsistent, more than I can recall w/
    any
    > other Abit mobo. It seems either you get a GREAT mobo (insane OCs to 250,
    > 260, or more), or mediocre results (230, if you're lucky). Unfortunately,
    > I'm with many others in the latter category, the system simply will not
    run
    > stable above 218MHz sync. I can just barely run 230MHz FSB w/ 5:4 without
    > XP hanging on boot-up, so it's not the memory. And believe me, I'm VERY
    > experienced and worked on this mobo for TWO MONTHS, to the point of
    > exhaustion, it just won't do it. So just beware, keep your fingers
    crosses.
    >
    > As I said, I can't run the CPU FSB above 230Mhz, and can't run the memory
    > past 218MHz. So that leaves me little choice, either run CPU FSB 230MHz
    > (5:4), and thus seriously underclock the memory, or run 218MHz (1:1) and
    > sacrifice some CPU OC'ing to keep the memory tapped out, and sync'd. Not
    a
    > great situation, my only option being to get some PC4000 perhaps. But at
    > today's prices, and given I don't think I'll being seeing anything more
    than
    > CPU FSB 230MHz anyway, I decided to stay put. I was *hoping* to run CPU
    FSB
    > 250 (5:4), apparently this is a pipe-dream. Even tried water cooling, no
    > dice. Yet others run the mobo 250 and up, I'm stumped.
    >
    > Since the P4 CPU is far more likely to be overclockable, I like to isolate
    > the memory by overclocking the CPU FSB and memory in sync (1:1). IOW, try
    > running 210, 220, 230, etc. In most cases, you'll tap out memory before
    the
    > CPU (for me, that was 220MHz). I determined this using Memtest-86, NOT
    > Windows. Windows is too demanding, takes to long to reboot, etc. And
    just
    > because Memtest-86 runs clean, doesn't mean Windows will. Many attempts
    to
    > OC in Memtest-86 ran fine, then hung Windows within seconds.
    >
    > I usually keep the memory at SPD until I tap it out, then start losening
    the
    > timings, to see how much more I can gain. At that point, that's my upper
    > memory limit. I then return to the SPD settings, then start tightening
    the
    > timings, again, until it becomes unstable under Memtest-86, that's my
    lower
    > limit. When completed, I have a low/high range for the memory. Of
    course,
    > during this process, I'm adjusting vDimm to see if it helps, within
    reason,
    > as necessary.
    >
    > Now I turn to the CPU. In this case, I suggest runnung 5:4 so that memory
    > now doesn't hinder the results (i.e., it's always underclocked, at least
    > until CPU FSB 250MHz). As with memory, I'm increasing voltage within
    > reason, as necessary when instability occurs.
    >
    > Again, all this is under Memtest-86. When completed, I have a pretty good
    > idea what the the CPU and memory can do, individually. I now try running
    > Windows, which invariably can't handle the maximum OC under Memtest. I
    > start working backwards, reducing CPU and memory OC's until Windows
    > stability returns. Once Windows loads and run (or appears to run) stable,
    I
    > run Prime95. Ultimately, I never accept OC'ing results until Prime95 runs
    > 24 hours, no errors.
    >
    > I strongly suggest keeping a diary, it really helps. You're adjusting a
    lot
    > of variables, and it can get awfully difficult to keep track. The last
    > thing you want to do is spend two hours mucking w/ the system, then lose
    > track of where you are. List all the variable (FSB, memory, voltages,
    > etc.), I even track memtest wall time to see if perhaps the OC is higher,
    > but results are deminishing (sometimes happens on asynch CPU/DRAM ratio!).
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >
    > "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:407b2a4d$1_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I'm just going through my last *stability* tests, and would like to
    begin
    > > testing the overclocking aspects of my new rig.
    > >
    > > I wanted to get the machine *Rock-Solid* using stock settings, now I got
    a
    > > solid base to work from on my overclocking!
    > >
    > > Intel® Pentium® 4 - 2.6GHz
    > > Intel® Retail HSF
    > > ABIT AI7 (BIOS #16)
    > > 512MB CORSAIR PC3200 (on Loan)
    > > ANTEC TRUE550
    > >
    > > I also have a THERMALRIGHT SP-94 + 92mm YS-TECH on standby, but I wanna
    > see
    > > what I can do with the retail unit first.
    > >
    > > What would you say is the standard procedure for testing your CPU and
    > mobo's
    > > FSB?. I know I should take the memory out the equation by setting loose
    > > timings, and also running the 5:4 divider, but what about the CPU?.
    > >
    > > This is my first attempt at overclocking a Intel® P4, so I wanna take it
    > all
    > > in. Do you guys say just push up the FSB like 5MHz at a time, and then
    > try
    > > to boot up and run some Prime95, then if you fail that, nudge up the
    vCore
    > a
    > > bit?.
    > >
    > > I read some reports of people running great overclocks using stock vCore
    > > (1.525v). I don't expect that myself, but I have been reading that up
    to
    > > 1.65v is fairly safe, as long as proper cooling is in place.
    > >
    > > So is that what I should do, relax the memory and start pushing 5MHz at
    a
    > > time, then if I hit problems just bump up the vCore?
    > > --
    > > Wayne ][
    > > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    Well, if I can't run, say, FSB 235 (5:4), thereby underclocking PC3200 to
    188MHz (vs. 200MHz spec), yet, I can run FSB 218MHz (1:1), no problem, I
    think it's safe to say memory is at least an issue. Even totally relaxed
    memory timings maxs no difference. Now, is it possible that running asynch
    (vs. sync) is itself causing a problem?! Maybe. IOW, if perhaps I had
    PC4000, maybe I *could* run FSB 250 (1:1). I've certainly considered it.
    Problem is, at these prices, who wants to run out an get PC4000 only to end
    up tapping out a 230 (1:1)! That's my dilemma. Perhaps if I found a deal
    on PC4000, I'd give it a whirl, but right now, it's not even a remote
    possibility. I originally got the PC3200 for a mere $176! Even that's now
    $286, on sale! no less.

    Trust me, I didn't go into the half of it regarding everything I tried. I
    reseated the Northbridge, disabled overdrive features, reduced memory
    timings, water cooling, changing DIMM slots, running HSF full bore, running
    default BIOS settings, vDIMM up to 2.8v, vCore up to 1.8v!, to name a few,
    even took to literally blowing an 80mm fan directly on the Northbridge, it
    just doesn't matter. Unless my CPU is simply a dud, something on this mobo
    is holding me back, I'd sure like to know what.

    Jim


    "TomG" <tgeery-NOSPAM-@cox.net> wrote in message
    news:4SPec.6853$55.3940@lakeread02...
    > not sure I agree that your ram is not the limiting factor, even at 5:4
    >
    > --
    >
    > Thomas Geery
    > Network+ certified
    >
    > ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    > ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    > This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    > over 130,000 FTP users served!
    > ^^^^^^^
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    news:ZHJec.1290$Yf6.377@fed1read07...
    > > I have almost the same setup, AI7 (BIOS 16), P4 2.6C (800MHz), 1GB
    > Kingston
    > > PC3200, Coolermaster Aero 4 (copper, 2800RPM, very quiet), currently
    > running
    > > 218MHz (1:1).
    > >
    > > Be forewarned, the AI7 is a fine mobo, but the OC'ing ability of this
    > > particular mobo has proven to be inconsistent, more than I can recall w/
    > any
    > > other Abit mobo. It seems either you get a GREAT mobo (insane OCs to
    250,
    > > 260, or more), or mediocre results (230, if you're lucky).
    Unfortunately,
    > > I'm with many others in the latter category, the system simply will not
    > run
    > > stable above 218MHz sync. I can just barely run 230MHz FSB w/ 5:4
    without
    > > XP hanging on boot-up, so it's not the memory. And believe me, I'm VERY
    > > experienced and worked on this mobo for TWO MONTHS, to the point of
    > > exhaustion, it just won't do it. So just beware, keep your fingers
    > crosses.
    > >
    > > As I said, I can't run the CPU FSB above 230Mhz, and can't run the
    memory
    > > past 218MHz. So that leaves me little choice, either run CPU FSB 230MHz
    > > (5:4), and thus seriously underclock the memory, or run 218MHz (1:1) and
    > > sacrifice some CPU OC'ing to keep the memory tapped out, and sync'd.
    Not
    > a
    > > great situation, my only option being to get some PC4000 perhaps. But
    at
    > > today's prices, and given I don't think I'll being seeing anything more
    > than
    > > CPU FSB 230MHz anyway, I decided to stay put. I was *hoping* to run CPU
    > FSB
    > > 250 (5:4), apparently this is a pipe-dream. Even tried water cooling,
    no
    > > dice. Yet others run the mobo 250 and up, I'm stumped.
    > >
    > > Since the P4 CPU is far more likely to be overclockable, I like to
    isolate
    > > the memory by overclocking the CPU FSB and memory in sync (1:1). IOW,
    try
    > > running 210, 220, 230, etc. In most cases, you'll tap out memory before
    > the
    > > CPU (for me, that was 220MHz). I determined this using Memtest-86, NOT
    > > Windows. Windows is too demanding, takes to long to reboot, etc. And
    > just
    > > because Memtest-86 runs clean, doesn't mean Windows will. Many attempts
    > to
    > > OC in Memtest-86 ran fine, then hung Windows within seconds.
    > >
    > > I usually keep the memory at SPD until I tap it out, then start losening
    > the
    > > timings, to see how much more I can gain. At that point, that's my
    upper
    > > memory limit. I then return to the SPD settings, then start tightening
    > the
    > > timings, again, until it becomes unstable under Memtest-86, that's my
    > lower
    > > limit. When completed, I have a low/high range for the memory. Of
    > course,
    > > during this process, I'm adjusting vDimm to see if it helps, within
    > reason,
    > > as necessary.
    > >
    > > Now I turn to the CPU. In this case, I suggest runnung 5:4 so that
    memory
    > > now doesn't hinder the results (i.e., it's always underclocked, at least
    > > until CPU FSB 250MHz). As with memory, I'm increasing voltage within
    > > reason, as necessary when instability occurs.
    > >
    > > Again, all this is under Memtest-86. When completed, I have a pretty
    good
    > > idea what the the CPU and memory can do, individually. I now try
    running
    > > Windows, which invariably can't handle the maximum OC under Memtest. I
    > > start working backwards, reducing CPU and memory OC's until Windows
    > > stability returns. Once Windows loads and run (or appears to run)
    stable,
    > I
    > > run Prime95. Ultimately, I never accept OC'ing results until Prime95
    runs
    > > 24 hours, no errors.
    > >
    > > I strongly suggest keeping a diary, it really helps. You're adjusting a
    > lot
    > > of variables, and it can get awfully difficult to keep track. The last
    > > thing you want to do is spend two hours mucking w/ the system, then lose
    > > track of where you are. List all the variable (FSB, memory, voltages,
    > > etc.), I even track memtest wall time to see if perhaps the OC is
    higher,
    > > but results are deminishing (sometimes happens on asynch CPU/DRAM
    ratio!).
    > >
    > > HTH
    > >
    > > Jim
    > >
    > >
    > > "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    > > news:407b2a4d$1_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    > > > Hi,
    > > >
    > > > I'm just going through my last *stability* tests, and would like to
    > begin
    > > > testing the overclocking aspects of my new rig.
    > > >
    > > > I wanted to get the machine *Rock-Solid* using stock settings, now I
    got
    > a
    > > > solid base to work from on my overclocking!
    > > >
    > > > Intel® Pentium® 4 - 2.6GHz
    > > > Intel® Retail HSF
    > > > ABIT AI7 (BIOS #16)
    > > > 512MB CORSAIR PC3200 (on Loan)
    > > > ANTEC TRUE550
    > > >
    > > > I also have a THERMALRIGHT SP-94 + 92mm YS-TECH on standby, but I
    wanna
    > > see
    > > > what I can do with the retail unit first.
    > > >
    > > > What would you say is the standard procedure for testing your CPU and
    > > mobo's
    > > > FSB?. I know I should take the memory out the equation by setting
    loose
    > > > timings, and also running the 5:4 divider, but what about the CPU?.
    > > >
    > > > This is my first attempt at overclocking a Intel® P4, so I wanna take
    it
    > > all
    > > > in. Do you guys say just push up the FSB like 5MHz at a time, and
    then
    > > try
    > > > to boot up and run some Prime95, then if you fail that, nudge up the
    > vCore
    > > a
    > > > bit?.
    > > >
    > > > I read some reports of people running great overclocks using stock
    vCore
    > > > (1.525v). I don't expect that myself, but I have been reading that up
    > to
    > > > 1.65v is fairly safe, as long as proper cooling is in place.
    > > >
    > > > So is that what I should do, relax the memory and start pushing 5MHz
    at
    > a
    > > > time, then if I hit problems just bump up the vCore?
    > > > --
    > > > Wayne ][
    > > > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    Hi,

    I am running 13x 231 (3GHz) with 1.6vCore with 57°C Max-Load running Prime95
    stable now for a few hours.

    I can boot WindowsXP Pro at 240/250MHz-FSB but Prime95 will fail in the
    first minute?

    The AI7 is indeed *undervolting* the vCore, so even though I have 1.6v set
    in BIOS, it is reading 1.57-1.59vCore in uGuru.

    Not sure if my CPU has maxed out *or* the mobo is having trouble with the
    240-250MHz-FSB? but Windows loads fine, just Prime95 will error out very
    quickly.

    The PC3200 Memory is running 5:4 with very slow SPD timings and GAT is
    A-A-A-D-D, so I don't think that is causing any issues *unless* the board
    doesn't like SLOW timings?

    Hehe so much for reaching 3.25GHz-CPU & 1GHz-FSB :P

    Hmm what else, the AGP is still default 1.55v, the PSB strap is 800. I feel
    like I want to give the northbridge/chipset some more juice but I don't
    think I can?

    How high can I go with the vCore? is 1.75v getting risky (as long as the
    cooling is ok?).

    Or maybe I just hit the ceiling of my humble SL6WS Costa P4c 2.6GHz (@3GHz)?

    My CPU:
    http://www.waynes.spamtrap.btinternet.co.uk/my_p4_box.jpg
    --
    Wayne ][
    <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    Jim, Wayne,
    I'm really interested to see how you make out w/ the various settings as I'm
    about to build a similar PC. Please post back w/ your results.
    Waiting on UPS...tap,tap,tap.

    IC7
    P4 2.4c stock HS&f
    OCZ EL Gold 3700 rev.2 (2x256mb)
    (2) Hitachi 80gb SATA hd's
    Radeon 9100 128mb AGP
    Thermaltake 420w PSU

    I used to overclock w/ my BE6-II and liked to think I was semi
    knowledgable on the matter, but all these new mobo/ram settings
    really have me confused...PBWM
    I will definately follow your suggestion on how/where to start OC'ing.
    Do either of you have any input for me concerning the actual build of the
    PC? How about ideas on loading XP. I heard there is a definite right &
    wrong order of things to do....mostly w/ drivers.

    TIA for any help
    Keith



    "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message news:<ZHJec.1290$Yf6.377@fed1read07>...
    > I have almost the same setup, AI7 (BIOS 16), P4 2.6C (800MHz), 1GB Kingston
    > PC3200, Coolermaster Aero 4 (copper, 2800RPM, very quiet), currently running
    > 218MHz (1:1).
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    "Keith" wrote
    > PC? How about ideas on loading XP. I heard there is a definite right &
    > wrong order of things to do....mostly w/ drivers.


    Hi,
    well I have my own way of building, which is to start fairly bare-bones (no
    HDD or Optical) just the floppy. I roughly arrange the cables and stuff,
    but I keep it a little rough to start, as normally I rebuild the system
    completely after I know it is rock stable and overclocking well. I don't
    take off the northbridge fan or anything like that, until I am certain that
    everything is working at stock.

    So on my current build, the cables are pretty neat, and allot of then are
    sheathed, will make it perfect soon. This time I did start with the retail
    INTEL HSF, so I can test it out and learn how it performs, but I have just
    bought a nice looking Thermalright SP-94 + YS-Tech 92mm fan to take the
    place of the stock unit.

    As far as Windows installation and drivers, well I let XP partition and
    format my RAID-0 boot drive for me, all done from the WindowsXP CD-ROM.
    Once Windows was installed I:

    1) Installed chipset drivers from my CD
    2) Installed my graphics-card drivers (CAT 3.7)
    3) Install DX 9.0b

    simple really, I also have the INTEL IAA RAID edition installed, dunno what
    it does? :P
    --
    Wayne ][
    <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    Keith,

    The basic build isn't all that complicated, but managing the OC is time
    consuming and requires *some* sort of methodology to make sure you're
    drawing the proper conclusions. I find many people OC too quickly, never
    taking the time to insure the system is stable. I'm not even interested in
    OC'ing for at least a couple weeks, I'm looking for stability initially.

    Regarding the install...

    On a new build, I always install BootIt NG ( http://www.bootitng.com ), even
    if I don't have a need for multi-booting right now. Easier to deal w/ on a
    clean system than dealing w/ *after*. It provides partition management,
    boot manager, and backup/imaging, all in one package. If you have this
    installed and available, it will make long term management of your PC much,
    much easier. Just some friendly advice.

    XP installs directly off the bootable CD and provides partition management
    features, but I never do it that way. I use BootIt NG to build a 4-6GB
    FAT32 partition, align it for NTFS conversion, add a menu item for that OS,
    give it a one-time option to boot from next device (CD), boot it, and
    install XP there. After XP is installed, I run convert.exe under XP if I
    want NTFS (I usually do for the OS partition). When completed, I then
    image the XP partition using BootIt NG and store it at the end of the HD.
    Now I have a bootable, restorable, working image of the initial install
    available to me at all times. So if I mess up further with installation, or
    future drivers, I don't have to go through the entire XP install again! I
    can also clone the XP installation whenever I want to experiment w/ new
    software, have suspicions about new drivers, want to save a snapshot, etc.
    I do this two or three times a month. Because I use this methodology, I've
    disabled XP restore, it's useless. If I want *long* term protection of my
    partitions, I use BootIt NG and image them to CD-R or DVD+-R media.

    As far as drivers, XP is incredibly good, unless you have something truly
    *new*, the OS is uncanny at finding and correctly configuring the PC, it's
    really miles above any prior Windows OS. I used to have to take out PCI
    cards and such under Win98, NT, etc., but this is rarely the case w/ XP.
    Defaults drivers are rarely a problem, and I've had ZERO problems
    configuring on-board audio, lan and other drivers I had to download from
    Abit.

    Regarding the OC...

    Since you have PC3700 (230MHz), I would advise running sync (1:1) first,
    thus underclocking memory (200MHz). Your only other option will be a 5:4
    CPU/DRAM ration, which means you'll be underclocking memory (230 / 5 * 4 =
    184 MHZ). PC2700 is only useful if you intend to OC the FSB, presumably
    230MHz, but I'd advise against this initially. Keep it all 200Mhz (1:1).
    Then when stability is acheived, and since we can assume the memory will run
    230MHz, start slowly increasing the FSB, keeping the CPU/DRAM ratio (1:1).
    This is likely to be successful, even *I* get 230MHz. If that's stable, now
    you can start running above 230MHz (1:1) to see how far you can push the
    FSB. Of course, your memory may hold you back at some point, perhaps VERY
    soon. Memory above PC3200 often has a much smaller margin of
    overclockability compared to PC3700, PC4000, and higher. You may be able to
    relax timings and add vDIMM to get a little further, but w/ PC3700, you'll
    probably top out at 240-250MHz FSB (1:1). Above 250MHz FSB (1:1), you;ll
    probably have to switch to 5:4, provide additional cooling, more vCore, etc.
    Of course, your memory suffers in the process, so it all boils down to how
    much you can achieve above 250MHz to warrant the hit on memory. Of course,
    don't count on 288MHz FSB (5:4) in hopes of bringing memory up to spec
    (230), extremely unlikely.

    If I had to speculate, you'll probably end up either running 230-240MHz 1:1,
    and remote chance of 250 (1:1), depending on quality of memory, OR,
    250-255MHz 5:4, if lucky. At that point, it's just a matter of benchmarking
    the two and seeing which produces the best results.

    HTH

    Jim


    "Keith" <corky@net1plus.com> wrote in message
    news:12f888ad.0404130857.6a95deb@posting.google.com...
    > Jim, Wayne,
    > I'm really interested to see how you make out w/ the various settings as
    I'm
    > about to build a similar PC. Please post back w/ your results.
    > Waiting on UPS...tap,tap,tap.
    >
    > IC7
    > P4 2.4c stock HS&f
    > OCZ EL Gold 3700 rev.2 (2x256mb)
    > (2) Hitachi 80gb SATA hd's
    > Radeon 9100 128mb AGP
    > Thermaltake 420w PSU
    >
    > I used to overclock w/ my BE6-II and liked to think I was semi
    > knowledgable on the matter, but all these new mobo/ram settings
    > really have me confused...PBWM
    > I will definately follow your suggestion on how/where to start OC'ing.
    > Do either of you have any input for me concerning the actual build of the
    > PC? How about ideas on loading XP. I heard there is a definite right &
    > wrong order of things to do....mostly w/ drivers.
    >
    > TIA for any help
    > Keith
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    news:<ZHJec.1290$Yf6.377@fed1read07>...
    > > I have almost the same setup, AI7 (BIOS 16), P4 2.6C (800MHz), 1GB
    Kingston
    > > PC3200, Coolermaster Aero 4 (copper, 2800RPM, very quiet), currently
    running
    > > 218MHz (1:1).
    > >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    I see your point. based on my experience with Corsair XMS3500, at 5:4 I was
    able to do 244 FSB on a 2.8C CPU (IC7-G board) and with Corsair XMS4400, I
    am able to do that same fsb with ram at 1:1, albeit slightly looser timings.

    however, with your experience with being able to do 218 at 1:1, that sort of
    indicates that the ram is not the limiter...

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 130,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^


    "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message news:hBRec.1603$Yf6.479@fed1read07...
    > Well, if I can't run, say, FSB 235 (5:4), thereby underclocking PC3200 to
    > 188MHz (vs. 200MHz spec), yet, I can run FSB 218MHz (1:1), no problem, I
    > think it's safe to say memory is at least an issue. Even totally relaxed
    > memory timings maxs no difference. Now, is it possible that running
    asynch
    > (vs. sync) is itself causing a problem?! Maybe. IOW, if perhaps I had
    > PC4000, maybe I *could* run FSB 250 (1:1). I've certainly considered it.
    > Problem is, at these prices, who wants to run out an get PC4000 only to
    end
    > up tapping out a 230 (1:1)! That's my dilemma. Perhaps if I found a deal
    > on PC4000, I'd give it a whirl, but right now, it's not even a remote
    > possibility. I originally got the PC3200 for a mere $176! Even that's
    now
    > $286, on sale! no less.
    >
    > Trust me, I didn't go into the half of it regarding everything I tried. I
    > reseated the Northbridge, disabled overdrive features, reduced memory
    > timings, water cooling, changing DIMM slots, running HSF full bore,
    running
    > default BIOS settings, vDIMM up to 2.8v, vCore up to 1.8v!, to name a few,
    > even took to literally blowing an 80mm fan directly on the Northbridge, it
    > just doesn't matter. Unless my CPU is simply a dud, something on this
    mobo
    > is holding me back, I'd sure like to know what.
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >
    > "TomG" <tgeery-NOSPAM-@cox.net> wrote in message
    > news:4SPec.6853$55.3940@lakeread02...
    > > not sure I agree that your ram is not the limiting factor, even at 5:4
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > Thomas Geery
    > > Network+ certified
    > >
    > > ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    > > ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    > > This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    > > over 130,000 FTP users served!
    > > ^^^^^^^
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > news:ZHJec.1290$Yf6.377@fed1read07...
    > > > I have almost the same setup, AI7 (BIOS 16), P4 2.6C (800MHz), 1GB
    > > Kingston
    > > > PC3200, Coolermaster Aero 4 (copper, 2800RPM, very quiet), currently
    > > running
    > > > 218MHz (1:1).
    > > >
    > > > Be forewarned, the AI7 is a fine mobo, but the OC'ing ability of this
    > > > particular mobo has proven to be inconsistent, more than I can recall
    w/
    > > any
    > > > other Abit mobo. It seems either you get a GREAT mobo (insane OCs to
    > 250,
    > > > 260, or more), or mediocre results (230, if you're lucky).
    > Unfortunately,
    > > > I'm with many others in the latter category, the system simply will
    not
    > > run
    > > > stable above 218MHz sync. I can just barely run 230MHz FSB w/ 5:4
    > without
    > > > XP hanging on boot-up, so it's not the memory. And believe me, I'm
    VERY
    > > > experienced and worked on this mobo for TWO MONTHS, to the point of
    > > > exhaustion, it just won't do it. So just beware, keep your fingers
    > > crosses.
    > > >
    > > > As I said, I can't run the CPU FSB above 230Mhz, and can't run the
    > memory
    > > > past 218MHz. So that leaves me little choice, either run CPU FSB
    230MHz
    > > > (5:4), and thus seriously underclock the memory, or run 218MHz (1:1)
    and
    > > > sacrifice some CPU OC'ing to keep the memory tapped out, and sync'd.
    > Not
    > > a
    > > > great situation, my only option being to get some PC4000 perhaps. But
    > at
    > > > today's prices, and given I don't think I'll being seeing anything
    more
    > > than
    > > > CPU FSB 230MHz anyway, I decided to stay put. I was *hoping* to run
    CPU
    > > FSB
    > > > 250 (5:4), apparently this is a pipe-dream. Even tried water cooling,
    > no
    > > > dice. Yet others run the mobo 250 and up, I'm stumped.
    > > >
    > > > Since the P4 CPU is far more likely to be overclockable, I like to
    > isolate
    > > > the memory by overclocking the CPU FSB and memory in sync (1:1). IOW,
    > try
    > > > running 210, 220, 230, etc. In most cases, you'll tap out memory
    before
    > > the
    > > > CPU (for me, that was 220MHz). I determined this using Memtest-86,
    NOT
    > > > Windows. Windows is too demanding, takes to long to reboot, etc. And
    > > just
    > > > because Memtest-86 runs clean, doesn't mean Windows will. Many
    attempts
    > > to
    > > > OC in Memtest-86 ran fine, then hung Windows within seconds.
    > > >
    > > > I usually keep the memory at SPD until I tap it out, then start
    losening
    > > the
    > > > timings, to see how much more I can gain. At that point, that's my
    > upper
    > > > memory limit. I then return to the SPD settings, then start
    tightening
    > > the
    > > > timings, again, until it becomes unstable under Memtest-86, that's my
    > > lower
    > > > limit. When completed, I have a low/high range for the memory. Of
    > > course,
    > > > during this process, I'm adjusting vDimm to see if it helps, within
    > > reason,
    > > > as necessary.
    > > >
    > > > Now I turn to the CPU. In this case, I suggest runnung 5:4 so that
    > memory
    > > > now doesn't hinder the results (i.e., it's always underclocked, at
    least
    > > > until CPU FSB 250MHz). As with memory, I'm increasing voltage within
    > > > reason, as necessary when instability occurs.
    > > >
    > > > Again, all this is under Memtest-86. When completed, I have a pretty
    > good
    > > > idea what the the CPU and memory can do, individually. I now try
    > running
    > > > Windows, which invariably can't handle the maximum OC under Memtest.
    I
    > > > start working backwards, reducing CPU and memory OC's until Windows
    > > > stability returns. Once Windows loads and run (or appears to run)
    > stable,
    > > I
    > > > run Prime95. Ultimately, I never accept OC'ing results until Prime95
    > runs
    > > > 24 hours, no errors.
    > > >
    > > > I strongly suggest keeping a diary, it really helps. You're adjusting
    a
    > > lot
    > > > of variables, and it can get awfully difficult to keep track. The
    last
    > > > thing you want to do is spend two hours mucking w/ the system, then
    lose
    > > > track of where you are. List all the variable (FSB, memory, voltages,
    > > > etc.), I even track memtest wall time to see if perhaps the OC is
    > higher,
    > > > but results are deminishing (sometimes happens on asynch CPU/DRAM
    > ratio!).
    > > >
    > > > HTH
    > > >
    > > > Jim
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    > > > news:407b2a4d$1_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    > > > > Hi,
    > > > >
    > > > > I'm just going through my last *stability* tests, and would like to
    > > begin
    > > > > testing the overclocking aspects of my new rig.
    > > > >
    > > > > I wanted to get the machine *Rock-Solid* using stock settings, now I
    > got
    > > a
    > > > > solid base to work from on my overclocking!
    > > > >
    > > > > Intel® Pentium® 4 - 2.6GHz
    > > > > Intel® Retail HSF
    > > > > ABIT AI7 (BIOS #16)
    > > > > 512MB CORSAIR PC3200 (on Loan)
    > > > > ANTEC TRUE550
    > > > >
    > > > > I also have a THERMALRIGHT SP-94 + 92mm YS-TECH on standby, but I
    > wanna
    > > > see
    > > > > what I can do with the retail unit first.
    > > > >
    > > > > What would you say is the standard procedure for testing your CPU
    and
    > > > mobo's
    > > > > FSB?. I know I should take the memory out the equation by setting
    > loose
    > > > > timings, and also running the 5:4 divider, but what about the CPU?.
    > > > >
    > > > > This is my first attempt at overclocking a Intel® P4, so I wanna
    take
    > it
    > > > all
    > > > > in. Do you guys say just push up the FSB like 5MHz at a time, and
    > then
    > > > try
    > > > > to boot up and run some Prime95, then if you fail that, nudge up the
    > > vCore
    > > > a
    > > > > bit?.
    > > > >
    > > > > I read some reports of people running great overclocks using stock
    > vCore
    > > > > (1.525v). I don't expect that myself, but I have been reading that
    up
    > > to
    > > > > 1.65v is fairly safe, as long as proper cooling is in place.
    > > > >
    > > > > So is that what I should do, relax the memory and start pushing 5MHz
    > at
    > > a
    > > > > time, then if I hit problems just bump up the vCore?
    > > > > --
    > > > > Wayne ][
    > > > > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    no way to adjust NB voltages without hardware mods, at least that I am aware
    of. if the ram is async (5:4) and timings loose, you haven't tried to play
    with PAT/GAT yet, and the ram is well rated to begin with, then you can
    *assume* (careful, there... it is not always a safe assumption...) that the
    ceiling you run up against is the CPU.

    then you try to tighten the ram timings and in most cases, unless the ram is
    something like the XMS4400 (or similar) Richard Hopkins was talking of, you
    won't be able to do 1:1. so, again, you tighten the timings or try to
    accomplish something with PAT/GAT. if really fast ram, then 1:1 with the
    ram and more testing but timings are usually a little looser...

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 130,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^


    "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:407beed3_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    >
    > "TomG" wrote
    > > I usually start by bouncing the FSB up a fair chunk without getting
    greedy
    > > just to get the first "chunk" out of the way. from there, I increment
    by
    > 2
    > > Mhz until I find instability and back off a bit.
    > >
    > > at this stage, you have to decide what your approach is going to be...
    > > upping the voltage to the CPU and continuing forward or what...
    >
    >
    >
    > Hi Tom,
    > thanks for reply, I promise not to bite your head off today :P
    >
    > One thing I was wondering, how can you separate your CPU and FSB when you
    > start to hit errors?
    >
    > I can adjust vCore if I think my CPU is getting a bit ragged, but what can
    I
    > do if I suspect my boards FSB is getting wobbly? is there anyway to
    adjust
    > northbridge voltages? or any other tools to help stabilize a overclocked
    > system bus?
    >
    > thanks as always
    > --
    > Wayne ][
    > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    1.75 seems mighty aggressive to me for CPU core... tighten the ram timings
    way up as a test to se if the system starts to fall over based on the ram
    tweak... if not, that may tell you that you have some overhead in the ram
    still available.

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 130,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^


    "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:407c48f0_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am running 13x 231 (3GHz) with 1.6vCore with 57°C Max-Load running
    Prime95
    > stable now for a few hours.
    >
    > I can boot WindowsXP Pro at 240/250MHz-FSB but Prime95 will fail in the
    > first minute?
    >
    > The AI7 is indeed *undervolting* the vCore, so even though I have 1.6v set
    > in BIOS, it is reading 1.57-1.59vCore in uGuru.
    >
    > Not sure if my CPU has maxed out *or* the mobo is having trouble with the
    > 240-250MHz-FSB? but Windows loads fine, just Prime95 will error out very
    > quickly.
    >
    > The PC3200 Memory is running 5:4 with very slow SPD timings and GAT is
    > A-A-A-D-D, so I don't think that is causing any issues *unless* the board
    > doesn't like SLOW timings?
    >
    > Hehe so much for reaching 3.25GHz-CPU & 1GHz-FSB :P
    >
    > Hmm what else, the AGP is still default 1.55v, the PSB strap is 800. I
    feel
    > like I want to give the northbridge/chipset some more juice but I don't
    > think I can?
    >
    > How high can I go with the vCore? is 1.75v getting risky (as long as the
    > cooling is ok?).
    >
    > Or maybe I just hit the ceiling of my humble SL6WS Costa P4c 2.6GHz
    (@3GHz)?
    >
    > My CPU:
    > http://www.waynes.spamtrap.btinternet.co.uk/my_p4_box.jpg
    > --
    > Wayne ][
    > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    "TomG" wrote
    > 1.75 seems mighty aggressive to me for CPU core... tighten the ram
    timings
    > way up as a test to se if the system starts to fall over based on the ram
    > tweak... if not, that may tell you that you have some overhead in the ram
    > still available.


    Hi Tom,

    I'm not quite sure what tightening up the ram timings will do to help me
    achieve a higher overclock, but as it running at 5:4 its only running 185MHz
    (370DDR).

    I just read something on HARD-OCP that says they couldn't get there test
    board above 235MHz FSB until they took off the North-bridge HSF and
    re-applied the thermal compound. Hmm I wonder if my northbridge HSF has the
    same badly applied thermal-compound?. The northbridge HSF doesn't feel very
    warm to the touch, I would expect it to be a little hot while running a
    231Mhz FSB?

    Anyway Prime95 is churning away, no errors yet after three hours so I will
    leave it to run-in overnight and see how I get on tomorrow.
    --
    Wayne ][
    <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>

    I will have to get this SP-94 into the action soon, maybe my current 57°C
    Load temps aren't helping? mayb
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    by tightening up the ram timings, I was only trying to suggest an indicator
    of whether the ram is already at or near limits. if you can tighten the
    timings with no ill effects, then that would indicate to me that the ram
    still had some overhead...

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 130,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^


    "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:407c5930$1_1@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    >
    > "TomG" wrote
    > > 1.75 seems mighty aggressive to me for CPU core... tighten the ram
    > timings
    > > way up as a test to se if the system starts to fall over based on the
    ram
    > > tweak... if not, that may tell you that you have some overhead in the
    ram
    > > still available.
    >
    >
    > Hi Tom,
    >
    > I'm not quite sure what tightening up the ram timings will do to help me
    > achieve a higher overclock, but as it running at 5:4 its only running
    185MHz
    > (370DDR).
    >
    > I just read something on HARD-OCP that says they couldn't get there test
    > board above 235MHz FSB until they took off the North-bridge HSF and
    > re-applied the thermal compound. Hmm I wonder if my northbridge HSF has
    the
    > same badly applied thermal-compound?. The northbridge HSF doesn't feel
    very
    > warm to the touch, I would expect it to be a little hot while running a
    > 231Mhz FSB?
    >
    > Anyway Prime95 is churning away, no errors yet after three hours so I will
    > leave it to run-in overnight and see how I get on tomorrow.
    > --
    > Wayne ][
    > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    >
    > I will have to get this SP-94 into the action soon, maybe my current 57°C
    > Load temps aren't helping? mayb
    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    Here's my stats:
    RAM ratio = 5:4
    P4C 2.6 @ 3.125
    vcore = 1.55
    HSF = stock
    Goop = Arctic Silver
    M/B = ABIT AI7
    FSB = 240
    Kingston HyperX PC3500
    2x512Meg
    timing = 2-3-3-7
    ddrv = 2.6v (stock)
    G.A.T. AAADD
    P.S.U. = 400w Enermax
    TEMPS: CPU NB PWM
    IDLE 39 34 37
    LOAD 61 39 56

    or

    RAM ratio = 1:1
    P4C 2.6 @ 2.862
    vcore = stock (1.525)
    HSF = stock
    Goop = Arctic Silver
    M/B = ABIT AI7
    FSB = 220
    Kingston HyperX PC3500
    2x512Meg
    timing = 2-3-3-7
    ddrv = 2.8v (Max Manufacturer spec)
    G.A.T. AAADD
    P.S.U. = 400w Enermax
    TEMPS: CPU NB PWM
    IDLE 37 33 35
    LOAD 57 38 50

    * extra case fan on top of M/B cpu pwr supply area helps alot


    "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:407b2a4d$1_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm just going through my last *stability* tests, and would like to begin
    > testing the overclocking aspects of my new rig.
    >
    > I wanted to get the machine *Rock-Solid* using stock settings, now I got a
    > solid base to work from on my overclocking!
    >
    > Intel® Pentium® 4 - 2.6GHz
    > Intel® Retail HSF
    > ABIT AI7 (BIOS #16)
    > 512MB CORSAIR PC3200 (on Loan)
    > ANTEC TRUE550
    >
    > I also have a THERMALRIGHT SP-94 + 92mm YS-TECH on standby, but I wanna
    see
    > what I can do with the retail unit first.
    >
    > What would you say is the standard procedure for testing your CPU and
    mobo's
    > FSB?. I know I should take the memory out the equation by setting loose
    > timings, and also running the 5:4 divider, but what about the CPU?.
    >
    > This is my first attempt at overclocking a Intel® P4, so I wanna take it
    all
    > in. Do you guys say just push up the FSB like 5MHz at a time, and then
    try
    > to boot up and run some Prime95, then if you fail that, nudge up the vCore
    a
    > bit?.
    >
    > I read some reports of people running great overclocks using stock vCore
    > (1.525v). I don't expect that myself, but I have been reading that up to
    > 1.65v is fairly safe, as long as proper cooling is in place.
    >
    > So is that what I should do, relax the memory and start pushing 5MHz at a
    > time, then if I hit problems just bump up the vCore?
    > --
    > Wayne ][
    > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    >
    >
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    TomG wrote:
    > I see your point. based on my experience with Corsair XMS3500,
    > at 5:4 I was able to do 244 FSB on a 2.8C CPU (IC7-G board)
    > and with Corsair XMS4400, I am able to do that same fsb with
    > ram at 1:1, albeit slightly looser timings.

    How much of a performance difference did you see by switching to a
    1:1 ratio? Is the difference all in memory bandwidth? It sounds like
    if you were running your PC3500 at a FSB of 244 with a ratio of 5:4,
    you were underclocking it to 195, correct? How high did the PC3500
    go at 1:1? So many questions...
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    With the ram at 1:1, I could not get anywhere near the 244 that I could run
    at with the ram at 5:4 so I didn't do a lot of testing as I felt that
    overall, the system was suffering from the lower FSB.

    memory bandwidth went from 5159 with the XMS3500 to 5625 without any real
    tuning (yet) by going to 1:1 with the XMS4400 and I will be trying to tweak
    timings and such as time goes on... FSB remained unchanged between those
    two tests. realizing that it is not a massive jump in bandwidth, it is
    still not insignificant and Richard Hopkins has posted that he was able to
    get the bandwidth numbers up in the 6000's.

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 130,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^


    "Fishface" <invalid@ddress.ok?> wrote in message
    news:107vous9te5nm40@corp.supernews.com...
    > TomG wrote:
    > > I see your point. based on my experience with Corsair XMS3500,
    > > at 5:4 I was able to do 244 FSB on a 2.8C CPU (IC7-G board)
    > > and with Corsair XMS4400, I am able to do that same fsb with
    > > ram at 1:1, albeit slightly looser timings.
    >
    > How much of a performance difference did you see by switching to a
    > 1:1 ratio? Is the difference all in memory bandwidth? It sounds like
    > if you were running your PC3500 at a FSB of 244 with a ratio of 5:4,
    > you were underclocking it to 195, correct? How high did the PC3500
    > go at 1:1? So many questions...
    >
    >
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    TomG wrote:
    > at with the ram at 5:4 so I didn't do a lot of testing as I felt that
    > overall, the system was suffering from the lower FSB.

    I was just wondering about the capabilities of the Corsair PC3500
    in the Intel setup. I have a couple sticks that are topping-out at 213
    MHz on my NF7-S. I wonder if the chipsets or something else can
    cause some of these boards to not run as fast.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    my XMS3500 seemed to top out and I was unable to use 1:1 at anything above
    stock FSB.

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 130,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^


    "Fishface" <invalid@ddress.ok?> wrote in message
    news:1080t5qgn950a9@corp.supernews.com...
    > TomG wrote:
    > > at with the ram at 5:4 so I didn't do a lot of testing as I felt that
    > > overall, the system was suffering from the lower FSB.
    >
    > I was just wondering about the capabilities of the Corsair PC3500
    > in the Intel setup. I have a couple sticks that are topping-out at 213
    > MHz on my NF7-S. I wonder if the chipsets or something else can
    > cause some of these boards to not run as fast.
    >
    >
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    My stats then: :-)

    *Processor*
    P4 2.6C @ 3250
    VCore at 1.7V (yeap.. high :-( )
    T_idle about 30°C
    T_stressed about 46°C
    Cooled by Zalman WB2 (water...)

    *Memory*
    4*256 MB Corsair XMS 3000
    runing at CAS 2.5/3/3/8
    Ratio: 5:4 (200MHz)
    V_DDR: 2.7 V
    This scores about 5400 MB/sec Sandra buffered.

    *Vid card*
    Radeon 9500 non-Pro 128 MB
    softmod to 9700
    O/C to 380/321 with Swiftech MCW50 (water)

    *PSU*
    365Watt Enermax
    active PFC

    Some pics:
    Go to www.tvdh.tk and select "main computer + watercooling"

    Thomas
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    "TomG" wrote
    > tighten the ram timings
    > way up as a test to se if the system starts to fall over based on the ram
    > tweak... if not, that may tell you that you have some overhead in the ram
    > still available.


    Hi TomG,

    well surprise, surprise! I think you may be onto something here?. My
    overclocks very *failing* when I used 5:4 memory ratio with *LOOSE* timings
    (2-8-4-4), but I somehow discovered that by tightening the memory I am
    making headway?

    I don't understand that? how come with loose timings my Prime95 was failing
    after a few minutes, but now I tightened the memory it seems to be working
    well?

    confused?
    --
    Wayne ][
    <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.abit (More info?)

    well, I have to admit that I thought that tightening the ram settings at a
    given clock would only do either nothing at all, showing that the ram was
    still "comfortable" and not the cause of any current instability, or help
    the system fall over and demonstrate that you had pushed the ram out of the
    envelope.

    I did not expect that one of the results would be to improve performance...

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 130,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^


    "Wayne Youngman" <waynes.spamtrap@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:40838567$1_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    >
    > "TomG" wrote
    > > tighten the ram timings
    > > way up as a test to se if the system starts to fall over based on the
    ram
    > > tweak... if not, that may tell you that you have some overhead in the
    ram
    > > still available.
    >
    >
    >
    > Hi TomG,
    >
    > well surprise, surprise! I think you may be onto something here?. My
    > overclocks very *failing* when I used 5:4 memory ratio with *LOOSE*
    timings
    > (2-8-4-4), but I somehow discovered that by tightening the memory I am
    > making headway?
    >
    > I don't understand that? how come with loose timings my Prime95 was
    failing
    > after a few minutes, but now I tightened the memory it seems to be working
    > well?
    >
    > confused?
    > --
    > Wayne ][
    > <Intel® Pentium® 4 - Online! :P>
    >
    >
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