LCD Color problems.

Up until recently I have been using CRT monitors exclusively.
When I bought a new computer I thought it was time to try a LCD monitor.
I read various tests/reviews/opinions on what would possibly be the best monitor for my use. (Which is primarily gaming)
After reading about 12 different tests where Nec Multisync 90gx2 ranked in the top 3 in every single one of them I thought this would be the one for me.

So I got the monitor and noticed that the top part of the screen was much darker than the lower part. (Viewed from a "normal" angle obviously)

And the lower part had very "washed out" colors.

I replaced the monitor right away thinking it was something wrong with it.
... but to my surprise the new one had the exact same flaw.

I then checked with a few friends that had different LCD monitors than the one I bought... and theirs had the same flaw aswell.

Do all LCD monitors have this "feature" ?
If yes... then why on earth do people just accept that the "new standard" in monitors are much worse than the old one?
If no... what LCDs does NOT have this flaw? And what causes this flaw in the first place?

For those out there that might be interrested in testing this on their own monitor... the flaw is mostly visible on "dark warm colors".
The easiest way to test this is:
Go to Desktop properties... select None as background picture... select burgundy (2nd col. just below black) or dark green (2nd col. 2 down from black) as background color and Apply.
If you have the flaw you will typically see that opposing corners have different "shades" of the selected color... as an example.. top left will look darker than bottom right etc.

For those of you that have problems with seeing certain colors well.. it also works with dark blue... but its much harder to see the difference.

Any input on this topic is welcome as Im still wondering if I should try replacing my monitor again, or just accept the loss and buy a new CRT instead.
8 answers Last reply
More about lcd color problems
  1. Newegg buyers have not complained of this. Any chance it could be your video card... is it old? VGA/DVI cable? Do you have "onboard" video? Do you have the latest video driver installed?

    Just fishing....
  2. Tested on a GF 7800 GTX and a Radeon 9800 Pro card.
    Tested with 4 different cables both new and old standard.
    Tested with 3 different driver-versions on the Geforce card
    Tested with 2 different driver-versions on the Ati card.

    All tests have the same result.

    Also tested my old CRT monitor on this card, and it shows no color-difference from top to bottom.
  3. My Dell 2405FPW out of the box was too bright and colors were not adjusted correctly, but it was easy to calibrate, and looks excellent now.

    I read an article on the newer LCD's, that color calibration was much better out of the box... creating a better mass user experience, for those who are not aware.
  4. Quote:
    My Dell 2405FPW out of the box was too bright and colors were not adjusted correctly, but it was easy to calibrate, and looks excellent now.

    I read an article on the newer LCD's, that color calibration was much better out of the box... creating a better mass user experience, for those who are not aware.

    I just got a BenQ FP93GX and the colors seem off abit. What is the best way to calibrate the colors and brightness. Mine to was way too bright out of the box. Any help would be appreciated.
  5. LCD displays do not have higher contrast ratios than CRTs.

    The most evident proof of that is their inability to produce true blacks. In a CRT or Plasma display that is obtained by not activating a dot(s), whereas an LCD has to block the backlight (not to mention "leaked light" from surrounding dots).

    Up to this date, there isn't a method to effectively do that. And this problem affects also color accuracy on LCDs. Much has been done in this aspect (and with very noticeable results, I may say), but LCDs still fall behind CRTs regarding contrast ratio.


    Edited for typo.
  6. Quote:
    LCD displays do not have higher contrast ratios than CRTs.

    The most evident proof of that is their inability to produce true blacks. In a CRT or Plasma display that is obtained by not activating a dot(s), whereas an LCD have to block the backlight (not to mention "leaked light" from surrounding dots).

    Up to this date, there isn't a method to effectively do that. And this problem affects also color accuracy on LCDs. Much has been done in this aspect (and with very noticeable results, I may say), but LCDs still fall behind CRTs regarding contrast ratio.


    In a practical sense, I think you are correct. However, LCD makers "creatively" claim high Contrast Ratios based upon very bright whites (darker blacks would be soooo much better)... usually so bright we have to tone them down to avoid burning our brain!
  7. True. They measure the contrast ratio for their displays based on the difference between the brightest white and deepest black.

    That's just like average response time when they com up with that gray-to-gray BS. Manufacturers are always hyping the specifications for their products, even creating "standards" for their convenience.
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