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Amped Wireless Intros First Long Range 802.11ac Devices

By - Source: Amped Wireless | B 14 comments

Early next year Amped Wireless will release a family of long-range 802.11ac products.

Amped Wireless said that it's introducing the industry's first long range 802.11ac wireless products: the RTA15 High Power Dual Band AC 700mW Wi-Fi Router, the REA20 High Power Dual Band AC 700mW Wi-Fi Range Extender, and the ACA1 High Power Dual Band AC Wi-Fi USB Adapter. These products will help create a wireless network reaching up to 1 gigabit per second.

For starters, the router will feature three high gain, dual band antennas and ten total power amplifiers (four 5.0 GHz 700mW, 2-Stage amplifiers, two 2.4 GHz amplifiers and four advanced low noise amplifiers). Also thrown into the mix will be a USB port for sharing an external drive or USB stick, and five Gigabit wired ports for connecting Ethernet-based devices. Additional features will include guest networks, adjustable Wi-Fi coverage controls, parental security and support for the latest Wi-Fi security.

To expand the router's wireless coverage, the separate range extender will also feature three high gain antennas and the same ten power amplifiers used in the router. It will also include a USB port and five Gigabit wired ports to add an additional five Ethernet-based devices to the network. Also included will be enhanced management and a "rich" offering of security and advanced features.

To access the full potential of 802.11ac wireless gigabit connectivity, customers will need the dual-band USB adapter. It will consist of two high gain, dual band antennas and four total amplifiers to maximize performance. It will connect using USB 3.0 to take full advantage of 802.11ac's gigabit data transfer speeds, but it will also be fully backwards compatible with USB 2.0 and 802.11a/b/g/n networks.

"Amped Wireless products feature advanced Wi-Fi amplifiers to boost wireless performance," the company said on Monday. "Standard Wi-Fi devices have a wireless output power of 50mW, while Amped Wireless products boasts 2.4GHz and/or 5.0GHz amplifiers with up to 1000mW of output power. The boosted performance is optimally tuned with high gain dual band antennas for maximum range and performance."

The RTA15, REA20 and ACA1 will be available early 2013, the company said. Expect to hear more about these products next month during CES 2013 in Las Vegas.


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  • 1 Hide
    halcyon , December 25, 2012 12:41 AM
    Okay, you can send this to me. I'm willing to do a long-term test...this time.
  • 7 Hide
    srhelicity , December 25, 2012 1:47 AM
    This article talks about long range 802.11ac devices, but I don't see any estimates of what "long range" means. Did I miss something? How long is long range? 1500 feet? 2 miles?
  • 2 Hide
    wildkitten , December 25, 2012 1:59 AM
    srhelicityThis article talks about long range 802.11ac devices, but I don't see any estimates of what "long range" means. Did I miss something? How long is long range? 1500 feet? 2 miles?

    I was curious too so I clicked on the link to the source and it says 10,000 square feet. Well, 10,000 square feet is 100ftx100ft, so I would assume that it reaches a radius of 50 feet which isn't exactly too long of a range. But it does look like a good product otherwise.
  • 0 Hide
    memadmax , December 25, 2012 2:01 AM
    Yea, but can it pirate Crysis?????
  • 3 Hide
    -Jackson , December 25, 2012 2:10 AM
    Quote:
    Yea, but can it pirate Crysis?????

    Killed it. :pfff: 
  • -3 Hide
    halcyon , December 25, 2012 4:35 AM
    I've decided that I'm willing to test this on a long term basis...this one time. You can go ahead and send it to me if you insist.
  • 2 Hide
    razor512 , December 25, 2012 5:01 AM
    50mw was common in like 2001-2003 but today, 300-500mw and some of the higher end $150 range routers will use upwrds of 600mw transmit power.

    A jump to 700mw will not give much of a range boost.

    Their main boost comes from using external antennas and not the crappy PCB antennas that are kept internal to save cost.

  • 0 Hide
    signothorn , December 25, 2012 11:45 AM
    I have one of their wireless usb adapters, takes up 2 usb ports but can pick up networks within about 1/4 of a mile, great stuff.
  • 1 Hide
    icepick314 , December 25, 2012 12:39 PM
    I don't know why these new ac routers and adapters still use USB 2...

    it's serious bottleneck when new ac protocol can go so much faster than usual USB 2...

    use USB 3 on the new ac equipments, dammit!!
  • 0 Hide
    tmk221 , December 26, 2012 11:10 AM
    wildkittenI was curious too so I clicked on the link to the source and it says 10,000 square feet. Well, 10,000 square feet is 100ftx100ft, so I would assume that it reaches a radius of 50 feet which isn't exactly too long of a range. But it does look like a good product otherwise.


    a radius of 50ft?? and it's called long range? After reading all that fancy specs I was expecting 10x this range to be honest..
  • 1 Hide
    catswold , December 26, 2012 1:40 PM
    tmk221a radius of 50ft?? and it's called long range? After reading all that fancy specs I was expecting 10x this range to be honest..

    Not much for careful reading, are you?

    "To access the full potential of 802.11ac wireless gigabit connectivity, customers will need the dual-band USB adapter. It will consist of two high gain, dual band antennas and four total amplifiers to maximize performance. It will connect using USB 3.0 to take full advantage of 802.11ac's gigabit data transfer speeds, but it will also be fully backwards compatible with USB 2.0 and 802.11a/b/g/n networks."
  • 0 Hide
    catswold , December 26, 2012 1:42 PM
    Oops, that last comment was meant for icepick314.

    Sorry.
  • 1 Hide
    razor512 , December 27, 2012 7:06 AM
    wanted to also add, the netgear R6300 has a transmit power of 720mw and that transmit power is software limited to confirm to FCC standards as the transmit power + the gain of the antenna goes into figuring out the FCC limit on transmit power so technically someone can mod the drivers to use the full of the amplifier and just push out 1584mw+

    most wifi amplifier chips can push out power well above the FCC limit, as their market is not just the US which has strong restrictions on wifi.

    When it comes to consumer routers, most people buy a wifi enabled box, and plug it in and never touch or look at it until something stops working. So while router makers can add features such as WDS, more extensive QOS controls, it wont do much to the average user who makes up the majority of the market, so the main selling point for routers is range and speed, and a stronger signal allows the router to offer fast speeds along a longer range (eg not getting dialup speeds at the far corner of your house)

    So the router makers generally just increase the transmit power and charge more for what is essentially the same transmit hardware with 1 or 2 numbers changed in the wifi drivers.

    PS for wifi upload and download connection rates are negotiated separately so at range with a high output router, it is not uncommon to see your wifi radio report a download connect rate of 60+mbit while the upload is only 11 or 5.5 mbit/s and since we download more than we upload, you are likely to get a noticeable performance boost from just increasing the router's transmit power.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , February 12, 2013 2:07 PM
    Guys thier stuff has way more then 50ft range:
    http://remixedcat.blogspot.com/2012/12/amped-wireless-sr20000g-wireless.html
    http://remixedcat.blogspot.com/2012/11/amped-wireless-ap20000g-full-review.html