Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

AMD's Fusion Chipsets to Support USB 3.0

By - Source: Channel Reg | B 33 comments

AMD has said that upcoming chipsets will feature support for USB 3.0, otherwise known as SuperSpeed USB.

USB 3.0 has been seen on motherboards for quite a while now, but USB-IF this week announced that the A75 and A70M Fusion chipsets from Advanced Micro Devices will be the first certified 'Superspeed USB' chipsets. USB 3.0 offers transfer rates of up to 5Gbps, quite an upgrade from the speeds offered by the ten-year-old USB 2.0.

“The integration of SuperSpeed USB into AMD’s Fusion Controller Hubs demonstrates AMD’s commitment to providing the industry’s latest, most innovative connectivity technologies,” said Chris Cloran, AMD Corporate Vice-President and General Manager, Client Group. “AMD Fusion Controller Hubs will provide competitive performance while consuming low power with active USB 3.0 traffic for high definition video and fast connectivity with the latest SuperSpeed USB devices.”

The announcement makes AMD the first company to integrate a USB 3.0 controller into its silicon. Rival Intel has yet to take the same step of integrating USB 3.0 into its own chipsets and, according to The Register, doesn’t have plans to do so until 2012. This almost definitely has something to do with Intel’s new baby, the Thunderbolt standard (previously known as Light Peak). Thunderbolt was unveiled at the same time as the new MacBook Pros, which support the interface, and though Intel has said it can exist alongside USB 3.0, the company definitely seems to have a favorite at the moment.

Display 33 Comments.
This thread is closed for comments
Top Comments
  • 19 Hide
    _Cubase_ , April 14, 2011 12:32 AM
    memadmaxwow, yay....There's a reason why usb 2.0 has been around for forever: It's enough.Is there a reason for 3.0, besides running 5 or more studio quality cameras for your own personal TV station in your basement?


    Everybody should cut this guy some slack... It took him a long time to dial-up and get on-line to write that comment.
Other Comments
  • -2 Hide
    oneblackened , April 13, 2011 11:54 PM
    Wait a second, doesn't the 800 series of SB's already support that?
  • 1 Hide
    eugenester , April 13, 2011 11:56 PM
    No, they have USB 3 support through the NEC controller.
  • -9 Hide
    memadmax , April 13, 2011 11:56 PM
    wow, yay....

    There's a reason why usb 2.0 has been around for forever: It's enough.

    Is there a reason for 3.0, besides running 5 or more studio quality cameras for your own personal TV station in your basement?
  • 4 Hide
    sephirothmk , April 13, 2011 11:58 PM
    I dunno about you, but transferring with 30mb/s on my external hard drive isn't enough when I'm copying over 100gb of data....
  • 8 Hide
    eugenester , April 13, 2011 11:59 PM
    memadmaxwow, yay....There's a reason why usb 2.0 has been around for forever: It's enough.Is there a reason for 3.0, besides running 5 or more studio quality cameras for your own personal TV station in your basement?


    Since when was 10x faster speed not "good enough"? The only reason USB 3 hasn't been widely adopted yet it is relatively new and USB 2's ubiquity is unchallenged so far. If everyone thought like you, we would still be at 640KB of memory for our DOS systems.
  • -4 Hide
    memadmax , April 14, 2011 12:01 AM
    That 30 meg a sec is prolly just your hard drive/controller or something else cause 2.0 does twice that.
  • 1 Hide
    alikum , April 14, 2011 12:02 AM
    oneblackenedWait a second, doesn't the 800 series of SB's already support that?

    I think it's not integrated. You get that from MB manufacturers.
  • 2 Hide
    Pawessum16 , April 14, 2011 12:03 AM
    memadmaxwow, yay....There's a reason why usb 2.0 has been around for forever: It's enough.Is there a reason for 3.0, besides running 5 or more studio quality cameras for your own personal TV station in your basement?

    ????????USB 2.0 bottlenecks external drives pretty bad (even my 500gb 5400rpm USB drive, and I cringe when I'm in a situation where I can't use eSata to connect my 7200rpm drive). So yes, there is a reason for USB 3.0
  • 19 Hide
    _Cubase_ , April 14, 2011 12:32 AM
    memadmaxwow, yay....There's a reason why usb 2.0 has been around for forever: It's enough.Is there a reason for 3.0, besides running 5 or more studio quality cameras for your own personal TV station in your basement?


    Everybody should cut this guy some slack... It took him a long time to dial-up and get on-line to write that comment.
  • 2 Hide
    SteelCity1981 , April 14, 2011 12:40 AM
    Thunderbolt is prob going go the way of Firewire. Most of your avg pc users are more concernd about comtability over anything else, which is why USB is not going to get knocked off its thrown for a long time. USB has been out now for a little over a decade with millions upon millions of products that support USB and becuse of that. It has become apart of the everyday pc users lives and one of the the reason why it's still around and Firewire is all but dead is because of its wide range of compatibilty over the years.
  • 2 Hide
    jrharbort , April 14, 2011 12:47 AM
    I'm more concerned for dual channel memory support. That small change would further widen the massive performance gap between the fusion and atom platforms.

    Quote:
    There's a reason why usb 2.0 has been around for forever: It's enough.

    If I remember correctly, USB 2.0 wasn't adopted very quickly either over the 1.1 standard. Even 1.1 stuck around for many years afterwards.
    Quote:
    That 30 meg a sec is prolly just your hard drive/controller or something else cause 2.0 does twice that.

    That's the theoretical peak of the interface. Your actual speeds will be far lower. Even with enhanced drivers designed for specific products, USB 2.0 can't put out more than 40MB/s.

    Plug any mechanical external drive into a USB 2.0 port and benchmark it, you'll see. Most mechanical drives easily exceed 100MB/s these days, so the extra overhead of USB 3.0 is very much welcomed.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , April 14, 2011 1:12 AM
    memadmaxwow, yay....There's a reason why usb 2.0 has been around for forever: It's enough.Is there a reason for 3.0, besides running 5 or more studio quality cameras for your own personal TV station in your basement?

    memadmaxThat 30 meg a sec is prolly just your hard drive/controller or something else cause 2.0 does twice that.


    Nope, back to the drawing board!
  • 0 Hide
    palladin9479 , April 14, 2011 1:13 AM
    USB 3.0 is a welcome addition, its the next evolution in the USB standard. What I really wanted was "Lightpeak" to support full HD video displays, basically I want my system to be in my computer room but be able to display to the living rooms HD display. If they can combine this with a USB channel (keyboard / mouse) and audio channels, then it would revolutionize how home computing is done.

    But it looks like Intel is trying to replace the open USB standard with their propriety Intel-only LP standard and not even bothering with the remote display capability.
  • 1 Hide
    Zeh , April 14, 2011 1:39 AM
    What's so good about integrated USB 3.0 controller over a a NEC controller?
    (forgive any inconsistencies in my question, altough I believe it's understandable)
  • 1 Hide
    JohnnyLucky , April 14, 2011 2:06 AM
    SATA III (6 Gb/s) has made an apeparance. PCI-e 3.0 will start appearing later this year. USB 3.0 is coming too. Seems to me technology is moving forward but not as fast as gamers and enthusiasts would like.
  • 1 Hide
    metallifux , April 14, 2011 2:11 AM
    Fantastic news, hopefully this means that Bulldozer will also support USB 3 natively. I can't see AMD supporting USB3 for their laptop systems but not there high end PCs.
  • 1 Hide
    palladin9479 , April 14, 2011 2:38 AM
    Cost for one, simplicity of design for another. MB manufacturers having to add another chip to a board raise's the cost of the design. Low power devices have a requirement to be cheap and small, add on chips conflict with this requirement.

    Just look back in the days with IDE controllers and IO controllers were "add in" cards and the issues those caused.
  • 0 Hide
    stingstang , April 14, 2011 3:05 AM
    So what The Register is saying is...Ivy Bridge won't be coming around until next year. Crap!
  • -1 Hide
    danwat1234 , April 14, 2011 4:40 AM
    eugenesterNo, they have USB 3 support through the NEC controller.

    What's an NEC controller?
  • 2 Hide
    jrharbort , April 14, 2011 5:00 AM
    danwat1234What's an NEC controller?

    Currently all motherboards that have support for USB 3.0 are using a controller chip manufactured by NEC, and fused to the motherboard. The motherboard chipset doesn't have any native support, so this is the only form of USB 3.0 for now.

    NEC is making a fortune I'm sure.
    Quote:
    What's so good about integrated USB 3.0 controller over a a NEC controller?
    (forgive any inconsistencies in my question, altough I believe it's understandable)

    For one, it would reduce data latency slightly. It would also be cheaper since it would be integrated within the system's chipset rather than buying a chip from a 3rd party. Having the USB 3.0 option right now usually increases the board cost by at least another $15~$20.
Display more comments