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AOC Reveals Portable USB-Based 16-inch Monitor

By - Source: AOC PR | B 21 comments

This monitor doesn't require a power or VGA connection, but instead gets its power/video feed from a USB port on a laptop or desktop.

For those who typically work in a multi-display environment, reducing the desktop real estate to a single laptop LCD is not only awkward, but can slow down overall performance. That's where AOC's new 15.6-inch-inch plug-and-play display comes in: it's lightweight and features a built-in USB 2.0 port that receives both power and video via a single USB cable -- separate power and VGA connections are not required.

Slated for a nationwide release this October for $139 USD, the TFT Active Matrix LCD panel (model e1649fwu) will feature a 16:9 aspect ratio, WLED backlighting, a dynamic contrast ratio of 50,000,000:1, a response time of 5ms, a maximum resolution of 1366 x 768 @ 60Hz, a pixel frequency of 85 MHz and a brightness level of 250 cd/m2. The display won't be compatible with High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP), meaning that a good chunk of copy-protected video won't be viewable on the display.

"The USB Monitor showcases AOC’s dedication to expanding its display offerings and using the latest technologies to come out with innovative and user friendly products," said Robert Velez, Marketing Manager of AOC. "The USB Monitor is ideal for business presentations, photo frame applications, multiple monitor displays and as a companion monitor for laptop and netbook users who want more out of their computer."

Tuesday AOC said the USB display will feature a clean, modern aesthetic complimented by a bezel covered with a black piano-polish finish. It will also have a built-in Smart Stand that will support both horizontal and vertical positions, will pivot out when needed, and then store flush against the back when not in use. A hard glass screen will offer users superior protection against accidental scratches and evil toy-throwing children.

According to AOG, the power requirements are seemingly minimal at a maximum of 8 watts: one laptop (or desktop) will support multiple USB Monitor connections to create a multi-monitor setup. "AOC’s industry-leading LED display technology allows for a powerful and crystal clear display while minimizing power consumption," the company said.

Look for the e1649fwu USB monitor next month at retailers like Best Buy, Cosco, hhgregg and other retailers for $139 USD.

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  • 12 Hide
    mavroxur , September 20, 2011 8:07 PM
    So the monitor consumes 8 watts... but the USB spec is 5 volts at 500mA. Basic math tells me that 8 watts is greater than 2.5 watts. Does this USB monitor have a cable that splits into 4 USB's at the computer's end to get enough power to drive it?
Other Comments
  • 1 Hide
    oparadoxical_ , September 20, 2011 8:04 PM
    Why wouldn't they base it on usb3.0??
  • 12 Hide
    mavroxur , September 20, 2011 8:07 PM
    So the monitor consumes 8 watts... but the USB spec is 5 volts at 500mA. Basic math tells me that 8 watts is greater than 2.5 watts. Does this USB monitor have a cable that splits into 4 USB's at the computer's end to get enough power to drive it?
  • -7 Hide
    atikkur , September 20, 2011 8:42 PM
    how it works? does it have a vga built-in?
  • 0 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , September 20, 2011 9:09 PM
    Umm... DO want if you can make it 12'' and have a VGA connection - would be perfect for testing PCs. Even so, I'm surprised with the price tag - usually that kind of "innovation" would cost an outrageous price.
  • 1 Hide
    lp231 , September 20, 2011 9:09 PM
    The only benefit I see with this monitor are
    Notebook users who likes to add more than one display and technicians that repairs computers from door to door, but for them it's better to grab a monitor with actual connectors and cost a lot less.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824009262

    Also AOC isn't the first to have a USB monitor, Samsung had one a long time ago.
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/monitors/display/samsung-sm940ux.html

  • 0 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , September 20, 2011 9:21 PM
    Quote:
    The only benefit I see with this monitor are
    Notebook users who likes to add more than one display and technicians that repairs computers from door to door, but for them it's better to grab a monitor with actual connectors and cost a lot less.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824009262

    Also AOC isn't the first to have a USB monitor, Samsung had one a long time ago.
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/monitors/display/samsung-sm940ux.html


    Indeed. But I want such a "test monitor" to be as small as possible, not 18'' and not 16'' either... 12 or less, and VGA, as you said :)  I doubt that a USB screen will work on BIOS level in all PCs.
  • 0 Hide
    maako , September 20, 2011 9:47 PM
    What about the graphic output, is it taken from the graphic card, APU or what?

    Also as #1 mentioned, with the USB 5v the Ampere should be 1,6A.
  • 0 Hide
    brickman , September 20, 2011 10:03 PM
    Might save your butt if your laptop screen dies and you need a monitor quickly and sell it after on ebay. I just skip the hassle and buy a real monitor.
  • 1 Hide
    jamie_1318 , September 20, 2011 10:13 PM
    Yeah, I'm kinda stumped on the 8 watt thing too. I have a USB 2.5" HD that drains a max of 2.6w (it's a black edition drive) and that requires two USB ports on 90% computers. so in order to run this you would have to sacrifice 3 USB ports, or plug it into a USB-power port (on a power adapter). Nothing with a max power draw of 8 watts should be able to run on a single USB connection as advertised. The article even clearly states it will use only a single USB port, so how is it drawing over USB rated 2.5w max?
  • 0 Hide
    lp231 , September 20, 2011 10:45 PM
    amk-aka-phantomIndeed. But I want such a "test monitor" to be as small as possible, not 18'' and not 16'' either... 12 or less, and VGA, as you said I doubt that a USB screen will work on BIOS level in all PCs.

    It seems newegg has a 8.9" and it's still USB!
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824185014
    Found this site that sells small LCD monitors with VGA and a USB card that actually produces 12v as well as 24v
    http://www.esaw.co.uk/products.php
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815158102
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815158168
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , September 20, 2011 11:58 PM
    lp231The only benefit I see with this monitor are Notebook users who likes to add more than one display and technicians that repairs computers from door to door, but for them it's better to grab a monitor with actual connectors and cost a lot less.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6824009262Also AOC isn't the first to have a USB monitor, Samsung had one a long time ago.http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/m [...] 940ux.html


    actually, i could see a use for a small usb monitor.

    i could have task manager open all the time without taking screen real estate.

    or i could use it as a play list so i dont have to take up space on my monitor when i have video full screend.
  • 0 Hide
    RazberyBandit , September 21, 2011 12:25 AM
    The specs indicate it's basically a portable 15.6" laptop/notebook screen.

    I don't understand how it can get enough power from a single USB connection, either. However, the idea of using one (or two) in conjunction with a notebook to create an extended desktop seems pretty cool.
  • 0 Hide
    eddieroolz , September 21, 2011 12:49 AM
    Do want. If it's as light as it seems it would make a great business companion.
  • 0 Hide
    bak0n , September 21, 2011 12:55 AM
    "Cosco"

    I'm guessing they are going to supply it through a restaurant supplies vendor then. That, or another proof read fail.
  • 2 Hide
    Device Unknown , September 21, 2011 3:18 PM
    This will become a great modders screen. I plan on getting one and modding it in the side of the PC and just connect it internally to the motherboard.
  • 0 Hide
    NapoleonDK , September 21, 2011 9:12 PM
    jamie_1318Yeah, I'm kinda stumped on the 8 watt thing too.

    mavroxurSo the monitor consumes 8 watts... but the USB spec is 5 volts at 500mA.


    The article mentions a maximum of 8 watts. USB power is measured in "Unit loads" (100ma in 2.0, 150ma in 3.0) up to a maximum of 5 loads in 2.0 (6 in 3.0). Reaching a total power of 500ma in USB 2.0 or 900ma in USB 3.0 as a standard. Provisions have been made for high-current devices, where the USB 2.0 port can provide 1500ma in a charging situation while still acting as a data port, or 1800ma in a power-only mode (where voltage is allowed to go up to 5.25v). Note that both devices have to be high-power certified to raise current levels that high.

    So the total maximum power you could expect from a modern USB 2.0 port, would be:

    5.0v x 500ma = 2500mw original specification.

    5.0v x 1500ma = 7500mw Modern, while still transferring data.

    5.25v x 1800 = 9450mw Modern, high current charging only (no data).

    Either way, that puts the monitor right at the dangerous threshold of current draw, and you can bet that it wouldn't work in older USB ports that only deliver 500ma.
  • 0 Hide
    mavroxur , September 21, 2011 9:25 PM
    Quote:
    The article mentions a maximum of 8 watts. USB power is measured in "Unit loads" (100ma in 2.0, 150ma in 3.0) up to a maximum of 5 loads in 2.0 (6 in 3.0). Reaching a total power of 500ma in USB 2.0 or 900ma in USB 3.0 as a standard. Provisions have been made for high-current devices, where the USB 2.0 port can provide 1500ma in a charging situation while still acting as a data port, or 1800ma in a power-only mode (where voltage is allowed to go up to 5.25v). Note that both devices have to be high-power certified to raise current levels that high.

    So the total maximum power you could expect from a modern USB 2.0 port, would be:

    5.0v x 500ma = 2500mw original specification.

    5.0v x 1500ma = 7500mw Modern, while still transferring data.

    5.25v x 1800 = 9450mw Modern, high current charging only (no data).

    Either way, that puts the monitor right at the dangerous threshold of current draw, and you can bet that it wouldn't work in older USB ports that only deliver 500ma.





    Which is great, if all computers / laptops / USB devices on the planet were certified as USB high power devices. A host or hub Charging Downstream Port can supply a maximum of 1.5 A when communicating at low-bandwidth or full-bandwidth, a maximum of 900 mA when communicating at high-bandwidth, and as much current as the connector will safely handle when no communication is taking place. However, not all USB hosts are capable of supplying more than the standard initially required.
  • 0 Hide
    NapoleonDK , September 21, 2011 9:35 PM
    ^Precisely. Hence my last sentence. :) 
  • 0 Hide
    jamie_1318 , September 21, 2011 9:53 PM
    Second that it is a little weird. I have got to wonder how many Computers actually deliver that amount though, most of them won't connect to higher load devices properly (my Hard drive in this case). Windows still displays the max power draw on most USB ports at 500ma. (you can check by right clicking on the USB hubs in device manger).

    I kinda expect this to end up being a branched-USB plug device with two computer ends being plugged in for it to work reliably 100% of the time. They need all the data they can get to run a display though a USB port!
  • 0 Hide
    dalauder , September 27, 2011 5:14 AM
    Solution: I bet it uses 2 AA batteries to compliment it and they just didn't tell us that yet.
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