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Acer Offers Windows 8 Upgrade Rebate on Ultrabooks

By - Source: Acer | B 31 comments

Acer is refunding the $15 upgrade fee for the Aspire S3, Aspire S5, Aspire M3 and Aspire M5 Ultrabooks.

On Thursday, Acer said that customers who purchase a specific Windows 7-based Ultrabook between June 2, 2012 and January 31, 2013 will receive a free upgrade to Windows 8 Pro.

Previously Microsoft launched its Windows 8 Upgrade Program which offers the new operating system as a $14.99 upgrade for anyone purchasing a PC in that same time period. Acer is essentially refunding that fee, asking customers to go through the standard Windows Upgrade Process first, and then load up Acer's special refund website to get their $14.99 back once Windows 8 hits the market in October.

"Here the customer will be asked to provide information to confirm they have completed the Microsoft Upgrade Program and to identify their product," the company said. "Once this has been verified and the customer has met the requirements, Acer will then refund the customer for the online cost of the Microsoft Upgrade Process."

Eligible products in this specific promotion include the Acer Aspire S3, Acer Aspire S5, Acer Aspire M3 and Acer Aspire M5 only. Microsoft's promotion however also covers Acer PC’s running Windows 7 Home Basic, Home Premium, Professional, or Ultimate, but the refund doesn't apply. Ultrabook customers can expect to receive their upgrade reimbursement in six to eight weeks after their submission, Acer said.

For those who purchased a Windows machine before the upgrade cutoff, Microsoft is offering a $39.99 Windows 8 Pro upgrade for customers currently running Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7. A packaged, DVD version of Windows 8 Pro will be available for $69.99. Both the online and in-store offer will run until January 31, 2013.

"We set out to make it as easy as possible for everyone to upgrade to Windows 8," Microsoft spokesman Brandon LeBlanc recently wrote in a blog post.

As for the Asus Ultrabook rebate, the company seemingly states it will be available everywhere save for North America. The full list of territories can be located here, and includes the United Kingdom, Australia, Poland, South Africa, Turkey and loads more. But don't fret: we expect to see a localized promotion appear in the next few weeks.

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  • 2 Hide
    mehrdad_ati , July 14, 2012 10:44 PM
    cool !
  • 2 Hide
    Unolocogringo , July 14, 2012 10:45 PM
    No thanks! I stick with what I got.
  • 4 Hide
    killerclick , July 14, 2012 11:21 PM
    Sure, I'd love to upgrade from an awesome OS like Windows 7 to something that was made for tablets and phones and then run apps made for tablets and phones. Microsoft needs their 30% cut from app sales and I have to do my part.
  • 0 Hide
    blazorthon , July 14, 2012 11:52 PM
    killerclickSure, I'd love to upgrade from an awesome OS like Windows 7 to something that was made for tablets and phones and then run apps made for tablets and phones. Microsoft needs their 30% cut from app sales and I have to do my part.


    You could simply not use Metro... It isn't like you need to use it even if you can't get rid of it. Other than logging on and clicking the desktop shell, I don't use Metro much, if at all. Just install a new start menu and you're good to go.

    http://www.softpedia.com/progDownload/ViOrb-Download-100126.html
    http://www.softpedia.com/progDownload/ViStart-Download-100121.html

    And if you want the skin manager for it, here it is:
    http://www.softpedia.com/progDownload/ViStart-Skin-Manager-Download-100203.html

    Problem solved. Now, you can use the advantages of Windows 8 over Windows 7 such as the slightly higher performance, the lighter resource usage, the improved scheduling (especially important if you use Bulldozer or other modular CPUs), the improved task manager, the improved copy/paste window, the improved WiFi connection time, and more.
  • 8 Hide
    SmileyTPB1 , July 15, 2012 12:04 AM
    @blazorthon MS has removed the code to disable Metro and there is no word on whether or not you will be able to disable it in the final product. If I had to guess MS final decision will be Metro or nothing.
  • -6 Hide
    DRosencraft , July 15, 2012 12:04 AM
    This seems like Acer's not so subtle revenge for the whole Surface thing. "You want to start cutting in on our hardware business, we'll hurt you on the software side". What better way to make MSFT look bad than giving consumers an incentive not to upgrade to the OS they need to do well relatively soon out of the gate.

    I'm still of the opinion that even if you're not completely sold on Win8, go ahead and get the upgrade. Put it on the side somewhere in case you change your mind. It'll save the cost of upgrading later on. In the end, I suppose that this deal isn't bad for the consumer. If you're absolutely, positively, sure you won't be upgrading, you save a little money.
  • 3 Hide
    SmileyTPB1 , July 15, 2012 12:05 AM
    Could we pay Acer to keep Windows 7 instead?
  • -3 Hide
    Anonymous , July 15, 2012 12:10 AM
    Just to add to what blazorthon said, you can move the desktop tile to be the very first and then just hit ENTER on the keyboard as soon as the metro start screen show ups on boot. Voila, just one extra keyboard key to get back to the familiar and improved desktop.
  • 2 Hide
    tomfreak , July 15, 2012 12:21 AM
    but it looks like to me that Win7 is the next WinXP, unless Microsoft drop Win7 support for DirectX12
  • -2 Hide
    blazorthon , July 15, 2012 12:40 AM
    SmileyTPB1@blazorthon MS has removed the code to disable Metro and there is no word on whether or not you will be able to disable it in the final product. If I had to guess MS final decision will be Metro or nothing.


    I didn't say anything about disabling Metro and I know that they removed the registry fix for it that worked in the older dev preview. In fact, I specifically said that you can't get rid of Metro. What I offered is a work-around for it to make it less relevant in spite of the fact that you can't get rid of it. Installing a new start menu is just installing a UI program/add-on like installing any other program and it still works in the current version of Windows 8 and will work in the RTM.
  • 4 Hide
    belardo , July 15, 2012 3:35 AM
    blazorthonI didn't say anything about disabling Metro...

    Again... its a fix for something that is broken. Changing functionality for the sake of doing it.

    These 3rd party replacements is kind of like.... well, having your penis removed but you can get a replacement rubber one. Doesn't exactly fix the problem.
  • 2 Hide
    wesleywatson , July 15, 2012 4:14 AM
    DRosencraftThis seems like Acer's not so subtle revenge for the whole Surface thing. "You want to start cutting in on our hardware business, we'll hurt you on the software side". What better way to make MSFT look bad than giving consumers an incentive not to upgrade to the OS they need to do well relatively soon out of the gate.


    What? This is an incentive to upgrade. They're basically covering the cost of upgrading to Windows 8, which is good for Microsoft.
  • 4 Hide
    SmileyTPB1 , July 15, 2012 4:24 AM
    Let's be honest. Is Windows 8 really going to be an "upgrade"?
  • 3 Hide
    AMD Radeon , July 15, 2012 5:12 AM
    it is likely a downgrade for me
  • -4 Hide
    blazorthon , July 15, 2012 7:06 AM
    belardoAgain... its a fix for something that is broken. Changing functionality for the sake of doing it.These 3rd party replacements is kind of like.... well, having your penis removed but you can get a replacement rubber one. Doesn't exactly fix the problem.


    No, they're not like that at all. They do fix the lack of a start menu completely whereas your analogy doesn't fix the lacking problem completely. Your analogy would be more correct if the replacement start menu programs didn't work, but they do work.
  • 4 Hide
    killerclick , July 15, 2012 8:02 AM
    blazorthonYou could simply not use Metro... It isn't like you need to use it even if you can't get rid of it. Other than logging on and clicking the desktop shell, I don't use Metro much, if at all. Just install a new start menu and you're good to go.


    Thanks for the workarounds, but that's not really the issue here.

    Why do you think Microsoft went out of their way to stop users from disabling Metro? Why do you think they're forcing users to boot into Metro instead of giving them a choice? Answer these questions and you'll know why finding workarounds doesn't help solve the underlying problem.

    If Windows 8 and Metro take off, there will probably be no desktop in Windows 9. There will only be Office for Metro, new DirectX will only be for Metro, software vendors will switch from making desktop applications to Metro apps, and you'll need Microsoft's permission to install anything on your computer. That's basically where they're going with this, and in Windows 8 they allow the users just enough choice to ease that transition, nothing more than they absolutely have to.

    At this point I'd rather use Linux than Windows 8, but I think that I won't have to. Windows 7 will be supported until 2020, and long before that Surface will fail, WP8 will fail and when the current leadership in Microsoft is ousted, hopefully they'll find a more intelligent and less arrogant way make mobile devices and PCs (which are nothing alike) work together.
  • 4 Hide
    DRosencraft , July 15, 2012 8:32 AM
    wesleywatsonWhat? This is an incentive to upgrade. They're basically covering the cost of upgrading to Windows 8, which is good for Microsoft.


    My mistake. I misread a portion - thought they were only offering the rebate if you DIDN'T actually upgrade to 8. Feel free to ignore my original post.
  • 0 Hide
    Bloob , July 15, 2012 3:54 PM
    belardoAgain... its a fix for something that is broken. Changing functionality for the sake of doing it.These 3rd party replacements is kind of like.... well, having your penis removed but you can get a replacement rubber one. Doesn't exactly fix the problem.

    Whether it is "changing functionality for the sake of doing it" really depends on the user. Like with touchscreen smartphones; touchscreens actually make them a lot worse as phones as many other designs, but it is not just about it using it as a phone. The same is with metro, it changes the way you use start, but it also adds to its functionality ( the whole live-tiles -thing for example ). If it is not worth it for you then just stick to your basic phone / start menu(win7/addons).

    Besides, I honestly haven't heard of anything, that's more difficult to do in Metro than the traditional start.

    As for Acer, sorry your hw is shite, so I'll stay away.
  • 0 Hide
    blazorthon , July 15, 2012 9:37 PM
    killerclickThanks for the workarounds, but that's not really the issue here.Why do you think Microsoft went out of their way to stop users from disabling Metro? Why do you think they're forcing users to boot into Metro instead of giving them a choice? Answer these questions and you'll know why finding workarounds doesn't help solve the underlying problem.If Windows 8 and Metro take off, there will probably be no desktop in Windows 9. There will only be Office for Metro, new DirectX will only be for Metro, software vendors will switch from making desktop applications to Metro apps, and you'll need Microsoft's permission to install anything on your computer. That's basically where they're going with this, and in Windows 8 they allow the users just enough choice to ease that transition, nothing more than they absolutely have to.At this point I'd rather use Linux than Windows 8, but I think that I won't have to. Windows 7 will be supported until 2020, and long before that Surface will fail, WP8 will fail and when the current leadership in Microsoft is ousted, hopefully they'll find a more intelligent and less arrogant way make mobile devices and PCs (which are nothing alike) work together.


    I recognize, understand, and can fully agree with that sentiment very well. What MS is trying to do is despicable. If someone doesn't want Windows 8 due to the way that MS is trying to pull on us, then I have find no fault with their reasoning. However, complaining about Windows 8 for the wrong reasons annoys the heck out of me like any other mindless whining and such. I most certainly dislike it when people try spreading misinformation as fact, especially on a tech oriented site that is full of people who should know better. What some people don't seem to realize is that a little knowledge about something, although occasionally helpful, can be far worse than almost none at all, especially when they get almost fanatical about it.

    However, I'm not so sure about Windows 8 failing. Don't forget that the average user probably didn't use the start menu in Windows 7 very much at all and also don't forget that they are the people that MS really cares about. Anyone in the business or enterprise and such markets, although they are the sort of people who are also important to MS and the most likely to have problems with Windows 8 if they don't know what to do with it, are also the most likely to either simply not care about upgrading to Windows 8 and Server 2012 and if they do and have trouble, they are likely to solve the problem by either downgrading or doing something about it if they really want to stay with the newer OSes.

    Then, there are people in the middle, such as us enthusiasts, gamers, and other mid-kinda high end users (some power users and professionals whom don't need incredibly high end systems for their work). Unfortunately, although we may have some sway, we are probably the smallest market for the tech companies. We get sandwiched between the other two and mostly have the consumer stuff to work with. Even worse, many of the larger sub-groups within this middle class, such as the professionals, can use either purely more business/enterprise oriented stuff that lacks many of the idiot-proofed and such qualities of the consumer stuff (stuff being hardware, software, OS, and anything else of that sort that I might have missed) or at least a mix. The rest of us can either figure our own way through a lot of problems (both perceived and actually real) or be otherwise screwed in some way(s).

    As far as I'm concerned, I'm more than willing to put up with a little more effort to save a buck or get some other sort of advantage. For example, on my own computers, I tend to use eval copies of Windows instead of buying my own. With hardware, I often try to get the absolute most out of it. This usually means that I like to use eval copies of server versions of Windows instead of regular versions due to the lower overhead and oftentimes better resource management. They also tend to at least be a little more secure and let me access more settings and such. I also make some use of different Linux distros (my preferred distro is Tinycore/Microcore because they only take up a little over 10MB of disk space, are probably about as light as a full desktop OS can get, and are faster than any other OS that I've ever used. They have effectively zero bloat.

    Tinycore is the 32 bit version. There isn't an official 64 bit version with a GUI, but it only takes a few minutes to download the three or four files that the home page tells you to (they're very small) and use PowerISO (or a similar program) to put them in the ISO image for the 64 bit copy of Microcore (it's basically Tinycore, except it is command line because by default, it has no GUI, that's what the few small files that you download are for). These files just happen to be hosted by that very site too and it's all very easy. That almost any Windows program can be made to run well in Linux nowadays also makes such a transition easier for people who at least have a clue as to what they're doing, even if they're not experts.

    My point is that you probably shouldn't think that people such as us are very relevant to MS's profits compared to other markets with many more people and that we probably won't react to Metro in the same way as those other peoples will. If there are problems, then we can try to solve them, but really, MS probably isn't going to solve their own problems just because of us nor are they likely to fail just because of us. Tens of thousands of mild to hardcore enthusiasts and such might hate Windows 8 (mostly for the wrong reasons, granted that's not relevant to this point), but millions of other users probably won't have such issues with it. If people want to send MS an impacting message, then they need to get more of the average users and/or the business/enterprises on-board for the ride too.

    For that to happen, they need to have reasons to dislike what MS is doing. There are several problems with that. For example, the average user probably has no clue about all of this, probably wouldn't care anyway, and even if they did, they would probably need reasons other than what we care about in order to be active about this. Their concerns are not the same as ours and even at best, most of them are probably able to be satisfied by Metro. It won't really get in the way of Farmville, email, other web-surfing, and office work. It also won't really get in the way of a lot of even stuff that people such as us do. If most people don't mind Metro, then for the most part, they won't mind losing the desktop shell too much (if at all) either. Unless there is something that you, I, or anyone else can do about that, MS is in control and we're left trying to make something out of it all, even if it means using Linux exclusively or at least almost exclusively.

    I'm also not sure about WP8 failing. In many ways, WP7's current version is actually quite excellent, granted it does still have some severe issues. If WP8 fixes at least most of them and at least alleviates the rest, then it could be great. I would probably still prefer my Android phones, but that doesn't mean that I can't appreciate the fact that the competition can be good too.
  • 1 Hide
    killerb255 , July 15, 2012 11:18 PM
    I'll try a tl;dr version of blazorthon's comment (which had good points, but most won't bother to read):

    - MS is trying to get their app store going, and are using Windows 8 as a trojan to do so
    - blazorthon finds it despicable, but finds straw man arguments against Windows 8 even more despicable, - Average Joe matters, enthusiasts don't when it comes to the bottom line/profit.
    - The Windows 8 failing reasons cited are stated from the point of view of an enthusiast. Enthusiasts are the 1%.
    - blazorthon uses TinyCore as his choice of Linux distro, still prefers Android as smartphone OS, but still appreciates the competition.

    Might have screwed it up, but it may get people to go back and read the original post, if for no other reason than to lambast the tl;dr version. :) 
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