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Corsair Adds ''Air Series'' Cooling Fans to Product Line

By - Source: Corsair | B 21 comments

Corsair has announced the release of its Air Series cooling fans: models AF120, AF140 and SP140.

Corsair's Air Series fans are designed to deliver a balance of airflow and low-noise to users who want to upgrade their PCs for quieter operation or higher performance. All the fans feature an advanced hydraulic bearing system and rubber mounts for low-noise and reliability, and include red, white, and blue color rings to allow users to customize the look of their PC.

The Air Series AF120 and AF140 airflow fans are designed to intake cool air into, and exhaust hot air out of, your PC. They are for mounting on the side, top, and rear of cases. The airflow fans are designed with ultra-thin, custom-molded blades optimized to flow high volumes of air in unrestricted spaces with at least 3 cm of clearance. They are available in a 140 mm Quiet edition and in 120mm Quiet and Performance editions.

AF120AF120AF140AF140
SP120SP120

The Air Series SP120 fans deliver focused air pressure in situations where air needs to be blown through a restricted space, making them ideal for cooling radiators and heatsinks. They feature seven ultra-wide, custom-molded blades and a custom enclosure that delivers high static pressure, while maintaining a quiet noise profile. It is available in a 120mm size, in both Quiet and High Performance editions.

Edition Description Size (mm) Noise (dBA) Airflow (CFM) RPM Static Pressure (mmH2O)
AF120 Quiet Low noise, Good airflow 120x25 2139.881100N/A
AF120 Performance High airflow 120x25 3063.471650N/A
AF140 Quiet Low noise, High airflow 140x25 2467.81150N/A
SP120 Quiet Low noise, High pressure 120x25 2337.8514501.29
SP120 High Performance High pressure 120x25 3562.7423503.1

  

The Air Series fans are available at a suggested retail price of $16.99 for AF120/SP120 fans and $18.99 for AF140 fans. For more information on Air Series fans, please visit Corsair's cooling section or Air Series fan blog post.

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  • -7 Hide
    wiinippongamer , May 7, 2012 7:40 PM
    meh.
  • 7 Hide
    mikewong , May 7, 2012 7:40 PM
    Cool!
  • 5 Hide
    Chainzsaw , May 7, 2012 7:41 PM
    I'm guessing these don't come in "thin" models.
  • 4 Hide
    sporkimus , May 7, 2012 7:59 PM
    I'd like to try out a couple of the AF140 fans.
  • -1 Hide
    buzznut , May 7, 2012 8:06 PM
    wiinippongamermeh.


    Exactly how I felt when I first saw these. Still do, meh.
  • -2 Hide
    TheBigTroll , May 7, 2012 8:33 PM
    these things will be loud like the stock h100 fans
  • 6 Hide
    thety6on , May 7, 2012 8:51 PM
    Idk about these specs... They seem a little overblown. Wouldn't be the first time a company tried to pull something like that off though *cough**cough*Phanteks*cough**cough*. I guess we'll just have to wait for a review, but for now, I'm sticking with my Gentle Typhoons. Best 120mmx25mm fans in regards to static pressure and noise level. The only problem with them is finding them in stock anywhere...
  • 1 Hide
    A Bad Day , May 7, 2012 9:25 PM
    What's the difference between "High Pressure" and "High Airflow"?
  • 2 Hide
    LukeCWM , May 7, 2012 9:33 PM
    Ingenious. I hadn't even considered using fans to push cool air into my computer and the hot air out. Thank goodness we have Corsair on the bleeding edge of technology bringing us these unprecedented discoveries. /sarcasm

    Anyone else think these were fans for RAM, or some other new thing, based on the title and wording of the article?
  • -2 Hide
    Anomalyx , May 7, 2012 9:37 PM
    A Bad DayWhat's the difference between "High Pressure" and "High Airflow"?

    High pressure is nice for intake fans. Low pressure fans can't push air in very well unless there are already fans blowing air out.
  • 3 Hide
    buzznut , May 7, 2012 9:38 PM
    A Bad DayWhat's the difference between "High Pressure" and "High Airflow"?

    These thin fans have low air pressure. That's why its not even listed on some models and why I said; "meh" The thin frames do not allow for good air pressure, which would make them useless for pushing air through a thick heatsink or even an air filter. More static pressure means that the air can be pushed through a resistance better.

    Airflow simply means the amount of air that the fan is capable of pushing at a certain rate of speed.

    Think of this as a water hose, a thick water hose can move lots of water but would need a lot of pressure to produce a jet. When you put your thumb over the end of the hose, you create a blockage which increases the pressure without increasing the flow of water. Since you've restricted the flow with your thumb, the same amount of water is trying to squeeze through a much small opening which increases the pressure many times.

    If you turn the hose on 1/4 of the way, your water flow may be 50 CFM, or cubic feet per minute. Turn the faucet halfway, and it may be 100CFM. Same with air flow, the CFM rating is how much air under ideal conditions a fan may be able to move in one minute.
  • 0 Hide
    Zeh , May 7, 2012 9:43 PM
    A Bad DayWhat's the difference between "High Pressure" and "High Airflow"?


    High Flow means there'll be a lot of air going through the fan, at least if there's nothing blocking it (like a dust filter). If there is a dust filter, the air flow will drop drastically, specially if there's too must dust in it.

    High pressure means it will be able to hold the specified air flow more easily, even with dust filters or other things blocking the air flow.

    For a side panel fan, you should opt for high flow.
    If you intend to use dust collectors or have a very tiny case, you might want to go the other way.
    An illustration: http://www.orientalmotor.com/images/mainContent/mf-staticpressure.jpg

    Also, centrifugal fans are able to provide more static pressure, while axial fans (like these) can offer higher air flow at low pressure gains.
  • 1 Hide
    e56imfg , May 7, 2012 10:17 PM
    Will they ship these fans with future cases? That would be freakin awesome.
  • -2 Hide
    becomecooler , May 7, 2012 10:19 PM
    I have to say they defiantly look nice, but they could learn a thing or two from the Austrians

    The states don't look that great comparing them to Noctua.

    Noctua NF-F12 PWM
    Size: 120 x 120 x 25 mm
    Max volume: 22.4 dB(A)
    Max air flow Airflow: 93.4 m³/h
  • 6 Hide
    frank the tank , May 7, 2012 11:53 PM
    becomecoolerI have to say they defiantly look nice, but they could learn a thing or two from the AustriansThe states don't look that great comparing them to Noctua. Noctua NF-F12 PWM Size: 120 x 120 x 25 mm Max volume: 22.4 dB(A) Max air flow Airflow: 93.4 m³/h


    Actually 93.4 Cubic meters per hour = 55 CFM
    at 22.4 DBA

    If noise is compared (the corsair AF120 Quiet) the corsair is 21 DBA but only moves 39.88 cfm.

    On paper the Noctua is a better fan but they are expensive. If corsair sells them for cheaper than the
    Noctua fans they might be a better value. I do agree Noctua fans are the bomb, but Corsair has been known for high quality products for a good price so I have a feeling Corsair is on to something good.

    Maybe Toms Hardware should do a case fan roundup to see how good they are
  • 2 Hide
    Zeh , May 8, 2012 1:53 AM
    becomecoolerI have to say they defiantly look nice, but they could learn a thing or two from the AustriansThe states don't look that great comparing them to Noctua. Noctua NF-F12 PWM Size: 120 x 120 x 25 mm Max volume: 22.4 dB(A) Max air flow Airflow: 93.4 m³/h


    You're comparing CFM to m³/h.
    1 Cubic Feet per Minute = 1,698 m³/h (cubic meter per hour)
    So those 93.4m³/h equals 55 CFM. They're just inflating the number - altough I prefer m³/h, since it's actually a unit the world (not just the US) uses.

    It is a bit better, just not that much. There's no easy way to increase air flow without increasing RPM (noise!) or diameter (size).
  • 0 Hide
    joeman99 , May 8, 2012 8:06 AM
    With a name like Corsair they should have called the fans Smooth Air.
  • 0 Hide
    alchemy69 , May 8, 2012 10:07 AM
    This "article" reads like sales pitch.
  • 0 Hide
    husker , May 8, 2012 7:21 PM
    Zeh...I prefer m³/h, since it's actually a unit the world (not just the US) uses.

    I'm from the U.S. and have been meaning to ask... what's this "world" others keep speaking of? :-)
  • 0 Hide
    __-_-_-__ , May 9, 2012 2:40 PM
    there's better and cheaper. nothing to see here.
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