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Antec Launches EarthWatts Platinum PSU Series

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 42 comments

Antec has launched a revised version of its EarthWatts PSU Series with the 80Plus Platinum certified tag.

Recently, Antec has announced the release of its 80Plus Platinum certified EarthWatts PSUs. This marks Antec's first Platinum-certified power supplies and an upgrade to the EarthWatts family to the highest standard of efficiency. The new EarthWatts PSUs offer users up to 93 percent energy efficiency compared to prior models, while saving users on average up to 25 percent on their electric bill.

Antec offers a 3-year quality warranty, a whisper-quiet 120mm DBB fan controlled by Antec’s Thermal Manager that uses CircuitShield for seven levels of protection. Antec's CircuitShield helps protect your computer with Over Current Protection (OCP), Over Voltage Protection (OVP), Under Voltage Protection (UVP), Short Circuit Protection (SCP), Over Power Protection (OPP), Surge & Inrush Protection (SIP) and Brown-Out Protection (BOP). Antec uses all Japanese capacitors and two fully-protected High Current +12V rails with high load capabilities to ensure maximum CPU & GPU compatibility.

The one downside to the new EarthWatts Platinum PSUs is that Antec didn't offer a modular design with the upgrade to the series. With more and more builders and enthusiast looking for a modular PSU for better cable management, this writer would've liked to see Antec incorporate a modular design or at least its Advanced Hybrid Cable Management design used with the EA-750 PSU.

Pricing for the EarthWatts Platinum PSU:

  • EA-450 Platinum is around $110
  • EA-550 Platinum is around $120
  • EA-650 Platinum is around $130

  
Learn more about the EarthWatts Platinum power supplies at Antec's website.

Add your comment Display 42 Comments.
Top Comments
  • 18 Hide
    phamhlam , February 27, 2012 3:19 AM
    It would have been nice to see it be modular. Other than that, I love the efficiency.

  • 16 Hide
    UmeNNis , February 27, 2012 4:16 AM
    dimarIs it physically possible to 'eventually' get 100% efficiency??

    No.
  • 10 Hide
    Ragnar-Kon , February 27, 2012 5:17 AM
    dimarIs it physically possible to 'eventually' get 100% efficiency??

    No, pretty much impossible to make anything 100% efficient. Theoretically it is possible, but physically, no. And as an electrical engineer that designs this stuff, losses are a pain, because it makes the math WAY more complicated.

    At any rate, these have been out for awhile now, but glad they are starting to see some press. I personally prefer Seasonic PSUs, but Antec would be my second choice.
Other Comments
  • 18 Hide
    phamhlam , February 27, 2012 3:19 AM
    It would have been nice to see it be modular. Other than that, I love the efficiency.

  • 3 Hide
    hellfire24 , February 27, 2012 3:22 AM
    Antec FTW!
  • 3 Hide
    gilbertfh , February 27, 2012 3:29 AM
    I know when you consider the prices compared to less noteworthy rivals it seems expensive but I have had nothing but luck with ANTEC PSU. I would love to see a review of these.
  • 0 Hide
    EzioAs , February 27, 2012 3:46 AM
    By only adding $10, you'll get 100W increase. Surely people would but the 650W over the other 2, I mean that's the best buy to me for sure
  • 0 Hide
    dimar , February 27, 2012 4:02 AM
    Is it physically possible to 'eventually' get 100% efficiency??
  • 9 Hide
    nikorr , February 27, 2012 4:03 AM
    Cool, but that EA-450 Platinum @ around $110 looks rather expensive.
  • 16 Hide
    UmeNNis , February 27, 2012 4:16 AM
    dimarIs it physically possible to 'eventually' get 100% efficiency??

    No.
  • 1 Hide
    Darkk , February 27, 2012 4:21 AM
    Funny about Antec's timing since Anandtech (Sorry Tom's) just did a review on Seasonic's new line of PSU. http://www.anandtech.com/show/5464/seasonic-platinum-series-860w

    I personally been using Antec's earthwatts for years and it's been great. Now am I am tempting to get Seasonic. Hopefully soon Tom's can review Antec's as well.

    Darkk
  • 2 Hide
    nukemaster , February 27, 2012 4:33 AM
    dimarIs it physically possible to 'eventually' get 100% efficiency??

    If you could, the power supply would make NO heat. Would be sweet, but not going to happen in my lifetime I would guess.
  • -8 Hide
    Darkk , February 27, 2012 4:42 AM
    nukemasterIf you could, the power supply would make NO heat. Would be sweet, but not going to happen in my lifetime I would guess.


    You can if you use cryo cooling system. Expensive idea but it could work.
  • 0 Hide
    waethorn , February 27, 2012 5:05 AM
    Good modular Antec PSU for cheap: Basiq Plus 550. Also comes with AQ3 warranty and 80 Plus.
  • 10 Hide
    Ragnar-Kon , February 27, 2012 5:17 AM
    dimarIs it physically possible to 'eventually' get 100% efficiency??

    No, pretty much impossible to make anything 100% efficient. Theoretically it is possible, but physically, no. And as an electrical engineer that designs this stuff, losses are a pain, because it makes the math WAY more complicated.

    At any rate, these have been out for awhile now, but glad they are starting to see some press. I personally prefer Seasonic PSUs, but Antec would be my second choice.
  • 6 Hide
    esrever , February 27, 2012 5:18 AM
    dimarIs it physically possible to 'eventually' get 100% efficiency??

    it would break the first rule of thermal dynamics.
  • 4 Hide
    waethorn , February 27, 2012 5:58 AM
    Ragnar-KonNo, pretty much impossible to make anything 100% efficient. Theoretically it is possible, but physically, no. And as an electrical engineer that designs this stuff, losses are a pain, because it makes the math WAY more complicated.At any rate, these have been out for awhile now, but glad they are starting to see some press. I personally prefer Seasonic PSUs, but Antec would be my second choice.


    You know that Seasonic is an ODM and builds PSU's for Antec, right?
  • 4 Hide
    4745454b , February 27, 2012 7:07 AM
    You'll never see 100% efficiency. To my knowledge we have never been able to 100% convert one form of energy to another. There is always loss. (easiest example would be resistance in the wires.) I'm not sure what the max possible would be.

    Seasonic used to build Antec PSU, but I think they've started using Delta and CWT for most of them now. No word in this article as to who makes them.

    As for these, meh. Way to much money for so little PSU. I know you save $$$ in the long run by using these, but I'm sure a bronze or gold unit would cost less, and not cost too much more to use.
  • 6 Hide
    DaveUK , February 27, 2012 7:56 AM
    "You can if you use cryo cooling system. Expensive idea but it could work."

    A more sophisticated cooling system would not prevent the power supply itself producing 'heat', the thermal energy just dissipates in a different way rather than causing an increase in ambient temperature. Just because the temperature doesn't rise due to cooling doesn't mean the PSU has hit 100% efficiency.

    "You'll never see 100% efficiency. To my knowledge we have never been able to 100% convert one form of energy to another. There is always loss. (easiest example would be resistance in the wires.) "

    Also wrong, no energy is lost at all - just present in different forms. For example resistance in wires produces thermal energy, the most extreme example being a heating element. You can't destroy or 'lose' energy, at least based within the physics understanding of our time.

    Do they even teach physics any more?
  • 3 Hide
    chrispegg , February 27, 2012 8:34 AM
    "Is it physically possible to 'eventually' get 100% efficiency??"

    As others have indicated, due to the laws of physics, it is only possible to have a 100% efficiency in theory, but it is physically impossible (Google "First law of thermodynamics"), so the answer to your question is "no, it isn't possible".

    The "waste" is usually in the form of heat driven through the work done by the system. The only way it can be in a state of "not giving off heat" would be for it to be powered off completely.

    The human body is a good example - when you exercise (work), you get hot, and your body will perspire (water cooling) to cool you down. The heat your body gives off is a different form of energy from the energy that builds your muscles and burns fat. You could also stand in front of a fan to cool down (much the same way as these PSU's have fans, to keep them cool when they're working).

    If the human body were 100% energy efficient, you'd be able to exercise indefinitely without ever getting tired or breaking a sweat.
  • 0 Hide
    EzioAs , February 27, 2012 8:37 AM
    Chances are, 80+ platinum are as high as we can get
  • 7 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , February 27, 2012 8:43 AM
    dimarIs it physically possible to 'eventually' get 100% efficiency??

    With a hamster and a wheel
  • 7 Hide
    mortsmi7 , February 27, 2012 8:47 AM
    DaveUKAlso wrong, no energy is lost at all - just present in different forms. For example resistance in wires produces thermal energy, the most extreme example being a heating element. You can't destroy or 'lose' energy, at least based within the physics understanding of our time.Do they even teach physics any more?

    When energy transfers to an unintended medium it counts as energy loss. And such loss is used in calculating efficiency.

    If your quarter falls down a storm drain, it is a loss regardless of this fact that it still exists.
    Perhaps you should retake physics and learn what the terminology means. Lost =/= Destroyed.
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