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Microsoft's BUILD 2012 Set Days After Windows 8 Release

By - Source: Microsoft | B 38 comments

BUILD 2012 will take place mere days after the retail launch of Windows 8.

Tim O’Brien, general manager of platform strategy in the Developer and Platform Evangelism group at Microsoft, announced on Wednesday that BUILD 2012 will take place just days after Windows 8 becomes commercially available.

Scheduled from October 30 to November 2, the event will be held on Microsoft's campus in Redmond rather than some "cavernous convention hall." The topics of discussion will include the just-launched Windows 8, Windows Azure, Windows Phone 8, Windows Server 2012, Visual Studio 2012, and much more.

"BUILD 2012 will be on the Microsoft campus, and I know what you're thinking ... if it's not in some cavernous convention hall, then it must be a dialed-down version of last year's event, etc. ... but don't be confused: this will be unlike anything we've held on our corporate campus in a long time. More details to come," he teased.

He also indicated that this conference isn't one to be missed. "As we talked about in the January post, if you've gone to a Microsoft developer event, you know that most of the speakers and participants are from our engineering teams, so a campus event puts you in the thick of things along with the engineers directly responsible for our products and the platform opportunities they represent," he added.

Registration for BUILD 2012 will begin at 8am PST on August 8 (aka 8/8 @8am). At that point, Microsoft will start sharing details about keynoters, sessions, content, and more. Previous reports also claim that Microsoft plans to officially reveal Windows Phone 8 to the public during the conference -- it will go RTM in September, and then see the first wave of WP8 devices in November, sources said.

In Wednesday's blog, O'Brien also apologized about the timeframe, as it falls within the DevConnections conference scheduled for October 29 to November 1. "Yes, we knew about the date, and yes, we were worried about the conflict, as lots of folks are already committed to going to Vegas," he said. "The date for BUILD was mainly driven by (among other things) the date for Windows 8 availability, and the goal of slipstreaming behind launch to bring our dev community together the week after. Apologies to those who have the conflict."

Microsoft is currently finalizing details on pricing, and will go live with the info on August 8, so stay tuned. "Because my thesaurus was unable to suggest a decent synonym for 'super excited,' let's just say we're stoked about BUILD 2012, and we hope to see you there," he said.

 

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  • 13 Hide
    back_by_demand , July 26, 2012 12:47 AM
    pjmelectDie Windows 8 Die.

    Enough already, just go use OSX if it means that much to you
  • 11 Hide
    hotroderx , July 26, 2012 1:11 AM
    I agree with Back I will at least try Windows 8 retail before I pass ultimate judgment on it. Who knows maybe people will even grow to love it.

    I am sure Microsoft caught tons of flack when they went from Windows 3.1 to Windows 95 over the interface changes. I am sure they caught some flack when they released XP and its new start button interface.

    I am hoping they will give us some way to switch back to the regular style start button. I think people would be much more open to Windows 8 if they just allow them to choose Metro or Start Button instead of trying to force them.
Other Comments
  • 13 Hide
    back_by_demand , July 26, 2012 12:47 AM
    pjmelectDie Windows 8 Die.

    Enough already, just go use OSX if it means that much to you
  • 2 Hide
    back_by_demand , July 26, 2012 1:10 AM
    ReFS is something I am seriously looking forward to in Server 2012, it's gonna add a whole new element to data resilience.
  • 11 Hide
    hotroderx , July 26, 2012 1:11 AM
    I agree with Back I will at least try Windows 8 retail before I pass ultimate judgment on it. Who knows maybe people will even grow to love it.

    I am sure Microsoft caught tons of flack when they went from Windows 3.1 to Windows 95 over the interface changes. I am sure they caught some flack when they released XP and its new start button interface.

    I am hoping they will give us some way to switch back to the regular style start button. I think people would be much more open to Windows 8 if they just allow them to choose Metro or Start Button instead of trying to force them.
  • -2 Hide
    back_by_demand , July 26, 2012 1:23 AM
    HotRoderxI am hoping they will give us some way to switch back to the regular style start button

    You already can, run Windows 7 in a VM
  • 3 Hide
    memadmax , July 26, 2012 1:30 AM
    Oh, I hope it doesn't rain when this goes down.
    Western Washington weather sucks sometimes.
    But I will be there, rain or shine =D
  • 3 Hide
    memadmax , July 26, 2012 1:37 AM
    HotRoderxI agree with Back I will at least try Windows 8 retail before I pass ultimate judgment on it. Who knows maybe people will even grow to love it. I am sure Microsoft caught tons of flack when they went from Windows 3.1 to Windows 95 over the interface changes. I am sure they caught some flack when they released XP and its new start button interface. I am hoping they will give us some way to switch back to the regular style start button. I think people would be much more open to Windows 8 if they just allow them to choose Metro or Start Button instead of trying to force them.


    When Win95 came out, most people didn't have a computer except for geeks and businesses. But when it did come out it was so revolutionary, people didn't care about the UI, or even knew what a UI was... XP did indeed catch hell, it was called too "sesame street like"...

    But Win8 just plain does not make sense.... for a desktop.
    If MS would just say "OK! we got 2 versions of Win8! One for tablets! One for desktop with the Start bar!" Then I would have their back. But they didn't...
    Oh, and good luck getting businesses to buy this thing ANY TIME soon. You have to literally retrain people how to use a computer because it is such a departure from decades of the start bar, we are also in a recession, making money tight for the software itself and training people for it...
    MS Will NOT MAKE MONEY with this thing for a long time.
    And if they think that the tablets will pick up the sales, they are wrong. There are signs that Apple/Android already saturated the market, and the recession is STILL here...
  • -7 Hide
    p05esto , July 26, 2012 1:40 AM
    back_by_demandEnough already, just go use OSX if it means that much to you


    Windows 8 is almost as crappy as OSX, it will burn to the ground. No chance of success for Windows 8, just freaking horrible.
  • 6 Hide
    back_by_demand , July 26, 2012 1:47 AM
    memadmaxOh, and good luck getting businesses to buy this thing ANY TIME soon. You have to literally retrain people how to use a computer because it is such a departure from decades of the start bar

    In most large corporations there will be banks of staff that all use the same 3 or 4 programs all day long, a Client Record Managment tool, an email program, the Office suite
    ...
    If these are placed on the home screen as big ass launch tiles then it will not take any retraining at all, click the tile and the program launches, when it does it behaves like it always did
    ...
    Honestly, way too much drama, try to dial it back a notch
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , July 26, 2012 2:00 AM
    After using the Server 2012 pre-release I have to say I'm really disappointed in ReFS. Initially I was excited it would bring ZFS-like features to Windows but its not even close. At this point it seems really half-baked.

    Many NTFS features are no longer supported. Their explanation is that they are not commonly used. This includes: "named streams, object IDs, short names, compression, file level encryption (EFS), user data transactions, sparse, hard-links, extended attributes, and quotas."

    Some of these I can understand, but quotas? those are widely used in enterprise environments. User data transactions (transactional NTFS) was just introduced in Vista and is a much better way to safely manage data updates. It's used by several windows subsystems like windows update so you don't end up with a broken system if theres a power loss.

    It is also incompatible with the new deduplication features. Self-healing only works with mirrored storage spaces so you have to choose between data integrity and space-efficient parity setups.

    Finally, they didn't add which is becoming an increasingly valuable feature: SSD caching. SSDs are becoming widespread and being able to use them for caching is a huge win in terms of I/O performance. For now it seems we're left with very expensive hardware options from FusionIO and/or SAN vendors.
  • 1 Hide
    nebun , July 26, 2012 2:03 AM
    from the way it looks, win 8 is more like a service pack....:( 
  • 0 Hide
    CaedenV , July 26, 2012 2:56 AM
    nebunfrom the way it looks, win 8 is more like a service pack....

    Sure, it is based upon the same general OS idea of Win Vista/7, but there are so many changes, improvements, and optimizations that it really runs like a whole different animal. You won't notice the difference so much on a desktop, but the difference on a laptop is astounding! My netbooks both run much smoother with win8, and they got a sizable increase in battery life (less HDD reading, less wifi use, less system overhead on the CPU and Ram all adds up). It is a true leap forward on the technical level, while still providing great backwards compatibility (for the non-ARM version anyways).
    The only issue to take with it is if you like Metro or not. Personally I am not a huge fan, but it is not bad either (especially once you have logical program groupings/labels, and link to your social media accounts). After using it a while I find it much more interesting/useful than the old start menu, and I also find that I simply never see it in day-to-day use (which is all in the desktop environment).

    Yes, there will be a learning curve, and it will be painful, but at the same time I think it will be much less of a leap as it was moving to win95 (which was broken until win98SE), WinXP (which was a cartoonish resource hog and 'required' 1GB of ram to run smoothly when 128MB was still the norm), or Vista (which was another huge resource hog, and 3rd party hardware developers had terrible driver support, especially for the 64bit edition). Win8 runs smoothly and stable on just about anything, is much smaller in size, and is fairly intuitive once you get the idea of what they are trying to do with Metro.

    So ya, there will be some preference issues with the new OS (it amazes me how much zeal people have for the Start Menu, but then again I have used several OSs over the years, most of which did not have a start menu), but to say that it will be the nightmare that some other 'upgrades' have been upon release is a bit of an overstatement. I mean, there is nothing worse than an OS that is simply broken, or where 1/2 of your hardware does not work properly for the first 2 years of use. My bet is a 1 year adjustment period, and then everyone will get over it and begin to move over.

    One thing is for sure; It will not be the train-wreck that Vista was.
  • 2 Hide
    AidanJC , July 26, 2012 3:01 AM
    Kind of looking forward to this release to be honest... Server 2012 on the other hand.. I just don't think that the metro interface is really made for a server...
  • 0 Hide
    Maxor127 , July 26, 2012 3:05 AM
    HotRoderxI agree with Back I will at least try Windows 8 retail before I pass ultimate judgment on it. Who knows maybe people will even grow to love it. I am sure Microsoft caught tons of flack when they went from Windows 3.1 to Windows 95 over the interface changes. I am sure they caught some flack when they released XP and its new start button interface. I am hoping they will give us some way to switch back to the regular style start button. I think people would be much more open to Windows 8 if they just allow them to choose Metro or Start Button instead of trying to force them.

    A horrible UI is a horrible UI. Windows 3.1 had a horrible UI too. Windows 95 was a step in the right direction. Windows 8 is a step back. Microsoft keeps trying to pioneer these horrible UIs. I doubt they'll ever switch back even if most people hate it. They're still using those crappy tabs in Office.
  • -3 Hide
    bspatial , July 26, 2012 3:20 AM
    I love Windows but I just really hate the face of that guy. What a dicko!
  • -3 Hide
    bspatial , July 26, 2012 3:21 AM
    I love Windows but I just really the face of that guy. What a dicko!
  • 1 Hide
    memadmax , July 26, 2012 3:53 AM
    back_by_demandIn most large corporations there will be banks of staff that all use the same 3 or 4 programs all day long, a Client Record Managment tool, an email program, the Office suite...If these are placed on the home screen as big ass launch tiles then it will not take any retraining at all, click the tile and the program launches, when it does it behaves like it always did...Honestly, way too much drama, try to dial it back a notch


    Ok, so in the context of large corps, you have 200-300 or so that have a real IT department and have the money on hand to do whatever they want to. That equals out to a rough quesstimate of maybe 20-30 thousand machines that run win8...

    But the vast majority of this country, hundreds of thousands, if not millions of companies are small business. Where their "IT Department" is maybe one or two guys, and about 300 computers maybe 500 tops. And their "IT Department budget" is limited to the scenario where "if it's not broke, don't touch it".... And alot of those same companies are still running XP because back then they had the money, they also had alot of custom software made that is dirt old but won't run on new OS's so they don't do anything with it because it still works.

    We can't all work in a Fortune 500 company, but it would be nice if we did....
  • 4 Hide
    qwerty_31 , July 26, 2012 4:12 AM
    Whats wrong with windows 7?
  • 1 Hide
    pocketdrummer , July 26, 2012 7:06 AM
    back_by_demandYou already can, run Windows 7 in a VM


    Or don't buy Windows 8 at all and stick with Win 7.

    Though it may be irrelevant soon. Steam is coming to Linux soon, so we won't have a reason to worry about ridiculous design decisions from either camp much longer.
  • 1 Hide
    pocketdrummer , July 26, 2012 7:08 AM
    HotRoderxI agree with Back I will at least try Windows 8 retail before I pass ultimate judgment on it. Who knows maybe people will even grow to love it. I am sure Microsoft caught tons of flack when they went from Windows 3.1 to Windows 95 over the interface changes. I am sure they caught some flack when they released XP and its new start button interface. I am hoping they will give us some way to switch back to the regular style start button. I think people would be much more open to Windows 8 if they just allow them to choose Metro or Start Button instead of trying to force them.


    If using the Vista release candidate was of any relation to using the current build of Win 8, I think I have a good understanding of what the product will be like at release. I will NOT buy that terrible OS. This is worse than Windows ME and Windows Vista put together.
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