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Biostar Unveils Its LGA1150 Motherboards

By - Source: TechPowerUp | B 27 comments

The company's new line of motherboards for 4th Generation Intel CPUs includes the HiFi-B85S2, the HiFi-Z87X3D and the HiFi-H87S3+.

At this year's CeBIT, Biostar revealed three new LGA1150 motherboards that feature the company's Puro HiFi on-board audio technology and a number of other interesting features. Starting off the line-up is the HiFi-H87S3+ mATX motherboard which is based on the Intel H87 chipset features 4 DDR3 DIMMs, one PCIe 3.0 x16 and legacy PCI slot and two PCIe 2.0 x1 slots. Also included are 2 USB 3.0 ports, six SATA 6 Gb/s connectors and DVI, D-Sub and HDMI outputs.

The HiFi-B85S2 is a slim ATX motherboard based on the B85 express chipset and features 2 DDR3 DIMMs, one PCIe 3.0 x16, PCIe 2.0 x16 (wired to the PCH) and two PCIe x1 and legacy PCI slots. The board also holds six SATA 6 Gb/s connectors, gigabit ethernet, 4 USB 3.0 and DVI, D-Sub and HDMI outputs.

Biostar's high-end offering is the HiFi-Z87X 3D which is based on the over-clocking friendly Z87 chipset and features support for 3 way SLI / CrossfireX courtesy of its two PCIe 3.0 x16 and single PCIe 2.0 x16 slots. Also included are three PCIe 2.0 x1 slots, 4 DDR3 DIMMs, six SATA 6 Gb/s connectors, USB 3.0 and DVI, D-Sub and HDMI outputs.

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  • 1 Hide
    anthonyorr , March 12, 2013 6:47 AM
    Ugly seems to be the standard look for Z87s shown so far.
  • 1 Hide
    ubercake , March 12, 2013 7:17 AM
    Hard to get excited about Haswell other than the possibility to save me $0.30 a month on my electric bill. Anyone have the skinny on why it makes sense other than power?
  • 0 Hide
    soundping , March 12, 2013 7:25 AM
    A head rolling on the highway look better.
  • 2 Hide
    quark004 , March 12, 2013 7:27 AM
    these are prototypes i think
  • 0 Hide
    TheBigTroll , March 12, 2013 7:27 AM
    haswell uses more power. what are you talking about?

    and about the motherboard, hey they fixed the usb3 location
  • 1 Hide
    jaquith , March 12, 2013 7:27 AM
    Hmm...no more LEGO Land color scheme...what a relief.
  • -1 Hide
    ubercake , March 12, 2013 7:34 AM
    TheBigTrollhaswell uses more power. what are you talking about?...

    So Haswell just doesn't make much sense?
  • 1 Hide
    TheBigTroll , March 12, 2013 7:37 AM
    Quote:
    TheBigTrollhaswell uses more power. what are you talking about?...

    So Haswell just doesn't make much sense?


    nah. it performs better but uses more power. i was referring to the guy who mentioned that haswell will probably save him 30 cents a month
  • 1 Hide
    nevertell , March 12, 2013 7:52 AM
    anthonyorrUgly seems to be the standard look for Z87s shown so far.

    lostmyclanugly as hell

    Yes, because looks matter.
  • 0 Hide
    anonymous_user , March 12, 2013 7:59 AM
    ubercakeHard to get excited about Haswell other than the possibility to save me $0.30 a month on my electric bill. Anyone have the skinny on why it makes sense other than power?

    This won't matter for serious gamers, but doesn't Haswell offer significantly improved integrated graphics? Might be nice for laptops.
  • 0 Hide
    ubercake , March 12, 2013 8:17 AM
    Quote:
    ubercakeHard to get excited about Haswell other than the possibility to save me $0.30 a month on my electric bill. Anyone have the skinny on why it makes sense other than power?

    This won't matter for serious gamers, but doesn't Haswell offer significantly improved integrated graphics? Might be nice for laptops.

    Ok. I know they're trying to get integrated graphics better and better on these processors, but until you can give me near-60fps performance, I'm doing nothing with integrated graphics outside watching blu-ray movies. I guess what's worse, is if this is more geared toward laptops, it's not really good that it will use more power (as theBigTroll said).

  • 1 Hide
    jimmysmitty , March 12, 2013 10:51 AM
    TheBigTrollhaswell uses more power. what are you talking about?and about the motherboard, hey they fixed the usb3 location


    The TDP going up does not mean more power use. Intel has always been a bit more lenient on TDP than normal.

    ubercakeOk. I know they're trying to get integrated graphics better and better on these processors, but until you can give me near-60fps performance, I'm doing nothing with integrated graphics outside watching blu-ray movies. I guess what's worse, is if this is more geared toward laptops, it's not really good that it will use more power (as theBigTroll said).


    From reports its supposed to be GT650M performance which would be pretty nice. Nothing major gaming worth but I wouldn't mind an HTPC with that kind of power in it.

    Plus since its a 'Tock' its a overall performance boost verses IB which was a 'Tick' + with GPU enhancements. So we should see CPU performance go up with a better IGP.
  • 3 Hide
    InvalidError , March 12, 2013 11:16 AM
    TheBigTrollhaswell uses more power. what are you talking about?

    Haswell has slightly higher TDP ceiling but its on-package VRM makes it 10X more efficient/faster at switching between standby and high performance modes so for a typical desktop environment where the CPU is almost idle most of the time between activity bursts (most computing falls in this category between computing-intensive tasks like gaming, rendering, simulating, etc.), Haswell can actually be a whole lot more power-efficient than Ivy Bridge.

    Also, Ivy Bridge's 77W TDP is for the CPU/IGP alone while Haswell's includes its ~80% efficient integrated VRM. Since only 80% of Haswell's 84W reaches the CPU die, the Haswell die itself would have a ~68W TDP.

    Finally, even though a chip may be rated at 77W or 84W, actual power use under real-world loads will not necessarily come anywhere near those figures. According to SMBus data, my motherboard's VRM only provides ~30W to my "77W" i5-3470 when under (CPU-only) full-load. TDPs are only a worst-case design guideline, you should not reach them under normal circumstances unless you have a worst-case CPU running a worst-case load.
  • 1 Hide
    ubercake , March 12, 2013 11:21 AM
    Quote:
    TheBigTrollhaswell uses more power. what are you talking about?

    Haswell has slightly higher TDP ceiling but its on-package VRM makes it 10X more efficient/faster at switching between standby and high performance modes so for a typical desktop environment where the CPU is almost idle most of the time between activity bursts (most computing falls in this category between computing-intensive tasks like gaming, rendering, simulating, etc.), Haswell can actually be a whole lot more power-efficient than Ivy Bridge.

    Also, Ivy Bridge's 77W TDP is for the CPU/IGP alone while Haswell's includes its ~80% efficient integrated VRM. Since only 80% of Haswell's 84W reaches the CPU die, the Haswell die itself would have a ~68W TDP.

    Finally, even though a chip may be rated at 77W or 84W, actual power use under real-world loads will not necessarily come anywhere near those figures. According to SMBus data, my motherboard's VRM only provides ~30W to my "77W" i5-3470 when under (CPU-only) full-load. TDPs are only a worst-case design guideline, you should not reach them under normal circumstances unless you have a worst-case CPU running a worst-case load.

    So, because of the on-package VRM, Haswell does offer increased efficiency and would probably save me 30 cents a month. What do you think bigTroll?
  • 0 Hide
    TheBigTroll , March 12, 2013 11:28 AM
    havent thought about a intergrated vrm being inside haswell. yeah, i guess it will use less power (system wise)
  • 0 Hide
    ubercake , March 12, 2013 11:58 AM
    So, we'll get a lot of hype and hear all of this marketing propaganda about all these record-breaking overclocks with Haswell for a couple of months and then after a few months the fanfare with this "processor of the year" will end. Then, after a couple of months, the review sites will be back to using X79 platforms for all of their GPU tests.

    I'm just thinking Haswell is nothing to get excited about.

    I really wish AMD would produce something to push Intel to create something more. I remember the days when I first picked up my Athlon 64...
  • 2 Hide
    InvalidError , March 12, 2013 12:30 PM
    ubercakeSo, we'll get a lot of hype and hear all of this marketing propaganda about all these record-breaking overclocks with Haswell for a couple of months

    I would not be so sure about record overclocks: the integrated VRM might raise immovable walls on power delivery - can't deliver more core power than what the integrated VRM can handle or whatever hard-limits may be programmed or designed into it.
  • 0 Hide
    blazorthon , March 12, 2013 3:54 PM
    anthonyorrUgly seems to be the standard look for Z87s shown so far.


    I don't find the board in this article's picture to be ugly. I think that it looks rather nice in a subdued0color and logical way. It looks like everything is out of the way of everything else and the almost universal black suits it nicely IMO. I'd like it a little more if at least two of the SATA ports were on a 90 degree angle pointing away from the rear input/output for greater convenience in many cases, but otherwise, I like it for what it is.

    Now that article with the hideous yellow PCB (I think it was an MSI test board) screamed ugly to me, but it's undoubtedly not representative of what the boards will look like when they launch.
  • 0 Hide
    ubercake , March 12, 2013 6:04 PM
    Quote:
    ubercakeSo, we'll get a lot of hype and hear all of this marketing propaganda about all these record-breaking overclocks with Haswell for a couple of months

    I would not be so sure about record overclocks: the integrated VRM might raise immovable walls on power delivery - can't deliver more core power than what the integrated VRM can handle or whatever hard-limits may be programmed or designed into it.


    That's what X- and K-series processors are all about. They'll sell some with unlockables here or there.
  • 0 Hide
    InvalidError , March 12, 2013 9:30 PM
    ubercakeThat's what X- and K-series processors are all about. They'll sell some with unlockables here or there.

    The extent to which VRMs may be unlockable without voiding the warranty remains to be seen. Unlocking it may very well require blowing a (standard-)warranty-voiding fuse bit.

    There is also the possibility that the integrated VRM does not scale much beyond Haswell's standard power range... Intel might need to put two of those on X-chips.

    Lots of unknowns.
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