Apple's Bob Mansfield Goes Back on Plans to Retire

Earlier this year, Apple announced that Bob Mansfield, the company's senior VP of Hardware Engineering, would be retiring. Apple said Mansfield would be replaced by Dan Riccio, VP of iPad Hardware Engineering. Apple didn't say when Bob's last day would be, but the company did say that the transition to Dan Riccio would take several months and that the hardware engineering team would continue to report to Mansfield until his departure. However, it looks like he's not leaving after all.

Apple today announced that Mansfield would be staying at Apple and reporting to Tim Cook. The change in plans was revealed as part of another release announcing the promotion of two current VPs (Craig Federighi, VP of Mac Software Engineering, and Dan Riccio, current VP of Hardware Engineering) to Senior VPs. Apple didn't elaborate on Mansfield's new role, but only that he would be working on future products and would report to CEO Tim Cook.

Mansfield joined Apple in 1999 when Apple acquired Raycer Graphics, where he was vice president of Engineering. As senior vice president of Hardware Engineering, Mansfield led the Mac hardware engineering division for seven years (since 2005), iPhone and iPod hardware engineering for two years and iPad hardware engineering since its inception. 

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  • subaru41
    It states that Apple announced his retirement. I wonder if it is because he started to question Apples unethical business tactics, or possible he didn't want to be a part of Apples downfall.
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  • Ragnar-Kon
    subaru41It states that Apple announced his retirement. I wonder if it is because he started to question Apples unethical business tactics, or possible he didn't want to be a part of Apples downfall.

    Or perhaps he just wanted to do something new? I doubt he wanted a pay raise, he was probably already making bank. Then Apple gives him what seems to be a new position and he opted to take it. If he was questioning Apple's ethics then why would he stay?

    Plus, it is hard to say that Apple's business tactics are unethical when there are hundreds, if not thousands, of companies that use the same or very similar tactics. Apple's practices just reach the news more often then most. And I'm not a betting man, but I'd say we are at least a couple more decades before we could even see a hint of this great Apple downfall people keep predicting.
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  • sheepsnowadays
    Guide the isheeps they need a new shepherd
    2