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CoD: Black Ops II Breaks $500 Million Mark in One Day

By - Source: Activision Email | B 43 comments

Black Ops II made over $500 million in the first twenty-four hours of its release.

Activision said on Friday that Call of Duty: Black Ops II achieved an estimated sell-through of more than $500 million worldwide in the first 24 hours of its release. Even more, this release marked the fourth consecutive year that its Call of Duty franchise has delivered the biggest entertainment launch of the year.

"With first day sales of over half a billion dollars worldwide, we believe Call of Duty is the biggest entertainment launch of the year for the fourth year in a row," said Bobby Kotick, CEO, Activision Blizzard, Inc.

According to Kotick, life-to-date sales for the Call of Duty franchise have exceeded worldwide theatrical box office receipts for "Harry Potter" and "Star Wars," the two most successful movie franchises of all time. Still, the publisher remains cautious about what lies ahead in 2013 and beyond.

"Given the challenged macro-economic environment, we remain cautious about the balance of 2012 and 2013," he said.

Million of fans attended more than 16,000 midnight openings at retail stores worldwide on November 13, the company said. The game even supposedly drove social conversation in its first 24 hours, as it was a top trending topic globally on Twitter in 23 cities worldwide.

"Call of Duty has become more than a product people buy, it's become a brand people buy into.  And every November we do more than just launch a game, we kick off an annual, unofficial but worldwide phenomenon called Call of Duty season," said Eric Hirshberg, CEO of Activision Publishing. 

Call of Duty: Black Ops II is available worldwide on the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and Windows PC. The game will also be made available on the Nintendo Wii U console on November 18, 2012. For more information about Black Ops II, head here.

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  • 10 Hide
    DirectXtreme , November 18, 2012 3:41 AM
    A Bad DayI'm still trying to understand how CoD is such a successful brand despite some negativity. Not sure if studying how it's successful would help me publish an interesting mobile app game (will be ported to desktop first, then to the mobile devices).

    Call of Duty is successful because of the following factors:
    1. It's accessible - a key ingredient to making a game successful is to make it n00b/idiot-friendly. This is the biggest reason Call of Duty is so successful, it caters to people who previously weren't gamers or who are gamers that don't want to play a challenging game (AKA casuals).
    2. It's mass marketed - Spend 9/10 (exaggeration, probably) of your game development budget on hyping up the game through marketing and advertising with advertisements that will give the player a sense of how much of a bad*** they are when they will be playing the game. This strategy is effective when you have built up a legion of sheepish customers who will buy your next big game no matter what.
    3. Its developers are lazy - Use the source code of an ancient, irrelevant engine, tweak it a little, copy and paste anywhere from 10-75% the assets from the previous game you made with that engine, tweak them, and release the (un)finished package (parts of the game will be made available later, but for purchase as DLC). This strategy saves time and money that would otherwise be allocated into developing new game assets.
Other Comments
  • 3 Hide
    boyabunda , November 18, 2012 3:05 AM
    Evidence? I don't believe this. This is just marketing by Activision.
  • 5 Hide
    edogawa , November 18, 2012 3:06 AM
    I know there's going to be a lot of anti-COD comments in here, but I bought BO2, I am actually having fun playing it on the PC. I like to play it at the end of the day, it's quick to get a game, and not hard to play; it's a good casual shooter.
  • 5 Hide
    DroKing , November 18, 2012 3:14 AM
    Still a stupid casual friendly game. Next please.
  • 2 Hide
    A Bad Day , November 18, 2012 3:14 AM
    I'm still trying to understand how CoD is such a successful brand despite some negativity. Not sure if studying how it's successful would help me publish an interesting mobile app game (will be ported to desktop first, then to the mobile devices).
  • 0 Hide
    aznshinobi , November 18, 2012 3:29 AM
    I'll be honest, COD games get a bunch of **** but at the end of the day, it's a game that many people will buy which make the community huge, and on the consoles, that's what makes it really fun tbh. Sure it doesn't take much skill, but that's what makes it so fun, at least in my opinion. I do like BF3 more, but it's not for everyone meaning the large scale FPS maps.
  • 1 Hide
    A Bad Day , November 18, 2012 3:29 AM
    edogawaYou need to find the right target group for your game an advertise to them; that's probably your best bet.


    The question, how do I interest them? How do I convince them that it's not another "me-too!" or some cash-cow scam?
  • 2 Hide
    Pinhedd , November 18, 2012 3:36 AM
    A Bad DayI'm still trying to understand how CoD is such a successful brand despite some negativity. Not sure if studying how it's successful would help me publish an interesting mobile app game (will be ported to desktop first, then to the mobile devices).


    Activision's marketing team is incredible. It's easy to sell CoD because CoD has a history of delivering exactly what is promised. CoD is a fairly shallow series as far as gameplay goes but it's energetic and story driven, which are very appealing elements for gamers who don't spend 8-12 hour stretches playing games at a time and simply want some brainless fun.

    There's an age old saying which is very, very applicable here:

    If it isn't broken, don't fix it

    EA has consistently made this mistake and has driven many franchises into the ground as a result. Activision does not make this mistake, and has been setting records as a result. The CoD formula is well established and hasn't changed at all since CoD 2.

    Most of the negativity leveled at CoD comes from hardcore gamers who won't play it anyway.
  • 10 Hide
    DirectXtreme , November 18, 2012 3:41 AM
    A Bad DayI'm still trying to understand how CoD is such a successful brand despite some negativity. Not sure if studying how it's successful would help me publish an interesting mobile app game (will be ported to desktop first, then to the mobile devices).

    Call of Duty is successful because of the following factors:
    1. It's accessible - a key ingredient to making a game successful is to make it n00b/idiot-friendly. This is the biggest reason Call of Duty is so successful, it caters to people who previously weren't gamers or who are gamers that don't want to play a challenging game (AKA casuals).
    2. It's mass marketed - Spend 9/10 (exaggeration, probably) of your game development budget on hyping up the game through marketing and advertising with advertisements that will give the player a sense of how much of a bad*** they are when they will be playing the game. This strategy is effective when you have built up a legion of sheepish customers who will buy your next big game no matter what.
    3. Its developers are lazy - Use the source code of an ancient, irrelevant engine, tweak it a little, copy and paste anywhere from 10-75% the assets from the previous game you made with that engine, tweak them, and release the (un)finished package (parts of the game will be made available later, but for purchase as DLC). This strategy saves time and money that would otherwise be allocated into developing new game assets.
  • 3 Hide
    madjimms , November 18, 2012 4:02 AM
    And not a single shit was given (by me)
  • 4 Hide
    nitrium , November 18, 2012 4:05 AM
    Quote:
    Activision's marketing team is second only Apple's.

    aka "the new iCOD".
  • 6 Hide
    dark_wizzie , November 18, 2012 4:22 AM
    All 12 year olds around the globe, REJOICE!
  • 1 Hide
    mouse24 , November 18, 2012 4:27 AM
    I sort of enjoy cod games once in a while. Sometimes you just need to have a good casual game to play that just allows you to simply shoot stuff. I have BF3 aswell and its good. But when I don't feel like playing as a team and just going off on my own, instead of being a detriment to my team in BF3 I go on cod and get my lonestar kicks their where its generally accepted.

    And I like the not so serious attitude.
  • 8 Hide
    tacoslave , November 18, 2012 4:48 AM
    nitriumaka "the new iCOD".

    its an acronym for "i choke on D***"
  • 2 Hide
    the3dsgeek , November 18, 2012 4:55 AM
    wait till GTA 5
  • -3 Hide
    tomfreak , November 18, 2012 5:02 AM
    edogawaWow, people are thumbing down my previous comment because I said I enjoyed the game, that's pretty low.
    people are ridiculous for their own stupid reason. I guess u have to deal with it.
  • 0 Hide
    greghome , November 18, 2012 5:11 AM
    Meanwhile.....Microsoft's Windows 8 has set a new record for Windows launches.....for actually not surpassing the previous Windows in sales......
  • 1 Hide
    Axelion , November 18, 2012 5:20 AM
    I agree that CoD is intended to casual people. Noobs can play the game easily without dying too much. Battlefield on the other hand is a harder game and intended towards veteran players.
  • 1 Hide
    ojas , November 18, 2012 5:30 AM
    ActiSheep...
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , November 18, 2012 6:00 AM
    uhmm.. yea this is not based on key activating, this is based off of sales to stores... ie 500 mil worth of stock.

    i would like to know the activation amount instead... its a much more accurate statistic.
  • 1 Hide
    Gundam288 , November 18, 2012 6:33 AM
    I can see the appeal to BO2 given that they have zombies with it again which adds value IMHO. I have not bought a CoD game since MW2, and nor do I intend to.

    As to the "$500 Million", I have my doubts. Possable? yes. Likely given the recent shafting of CoD elite players? not likely.



    In other news, Chris Robert's Star Citizen now has 1 day left of crowdfunding and is currently over $4,520,000 in pledges.
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