Cooler Master Introduces G-Series PSUs

Cooler Master has announced a new series of power supplies, the G-Series. The G-series of power supplies will first come in three versions, a 500 W version, a 600 W version, and a 700 W version. All of the units are 80 Plus Bronze certified, and managed this because of active PFC. As expected from any decent new power supply, the units are also fully compatible with Haswell processors.

All of the units feature a single, high-power 12 V rail design, supporting up to 55 A over the 12 V rail. The PSUs are cooled by a 120 mm fan, which will always run a silent profile at up to a load of 70 percent. The units feature all the expected safety features including OVP, OCP, SCP, and OTP.

Connectivity is taken care of by the standard 24-Pin ATX and EPS connectors, as well as six SATA connectors (9 for the G700), and three molex connectors. The most powerful version, the G700, also has support for multiple graphics cards.

The G-series power supplies from Cooler Master will hit retail channels around the beginning of August, and are expected to have a street price of €59.95, €69.95, and €79.95 for the G500, G600, and G700, respectively.

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  • Sakkura
    Unless I see some glowing reviews or evidence that they're made by Seasonic or the like, I'll just assume G is for Garbage.
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  • jeffunit
    "All of the units are 80 Plus Bronze certified, and managed this because of active PFC."

    Really?

    Does this mean all power supplies with PFC are 80+ bronze?
    Why is it that most 80+ (no color) as well as 80+ silver, gold, and platinum also have PFC?

    Is it possible that power factor control simply controls the current waveform that the power supply draws and has nothing at all to do with the power supply efficiency?

    Perhaps the topology of the power supply controls the power supply efficiency.

    And how is active power factor control different from passive PFC?

    Which one does these power supplies have?

    Perhaps simply quoting marketing hype isn't a good idea.
    -1
  • jeffunit
    "The PSUs are cooled by a 120 mm fan, which will always run a silent profile at up to a load of 70 percent."

    This is a novel idea. I thought that fans speed should be a function of temperature, not load on the power supply. If the load is 30% but the temperature if 45C, I don't want my fan running in "a silent profile".
    1