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Fujitsu Launching Build-It-Yourself PC Service

By - Source: Fujitsu | B 31 comments

Next month, Fujitsu will be offering notebook and desktop assembly kits backed by detailed customer support.

On Thursday, Fujitsu announced its new Hands-on Custom PC Assembly Service. This will allow customers to build their own PC from the ground up while also receiving Fujitsu assembly support, and direction on the inner structure of PCs, provided by engineers. This means customers can experience the thrill of building their own customized PC regardless of their technical skill level.

"Normally with PC construction kits, the customer must personally manage a number of very specific procedures, such as system wiring, which if not performed accurately, could lead to system failure," the company said. "Performing such tasks properly typically requires a high level of computer knowledge. With this in mind, the new service provides the necessary components, while at the same time deploying instructors and technical staff to explain and support assembly."

Customers won't exactly start from scratch: the motherboard will already be pre-installed to "reduce detailed processes" like using screws and plugging in the power switch connector. Everything else will be provided in 15 individually packaged units within the assembly kit. These are organized by major components such as the CPU, system memory, the hard drive and so on. A single screwdriver works with all screws, simplifying the DIY process.

"By taking advantage of this new service, customers will get the chance to assemble essential components of computers not seen in everyday operation while receiving easy-to-understand explanations from instructors on the functions of components, such as the CPU, system memory, and the hard disk," the company said. "Furthermore, learning a computer's internal construction will allow customers to apply this fundamental knowledge to preventing and troubleshooting problems in their everyday computer usage. This could be, for example, realizing that parts like the hard drive are sensitive to impact, or guessing that the cause of a strange noise might be the CPU or hard disk."

Fujitsu said computer assembly instructions will include both notebook and desktop PCs. The overall assembly lineup will feature 19 different models from four different series, including the Lifebook AH large-screen series of notebooks, the all-in-one Esprimo FH PC series, the high-performance Esprimo DH desktop series, and the Raku-Raku PC series. The CPU, system memory, and hard disk can all be configured to specifications that meet customer requirements.

For now, the DIY service is launching in Japan on August 9th, offered through PC instruction schools, travel agencies, and event sponsors. The company didn't say when -- or even if -- this program is headed to the States, but we're thinking this could start a new trend that other manufacturers may pick up on and offer locally.

Would this program be worth the money? Obviously the general consumer won't care about building their own PC -- they'd rather depend on the warranty and let customer service deal with problems. But it may be ideal for those wanting to learn how to assemble a PC, but are weary about the cost vs. potential damage factor associated with building that first rig solo.

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Top Comments
  • 14 Hide
    drwho1 , July 5, 2012 7:07 PM
    Why is this AD here on Tom's?
    Most people here already build their own systems anyways, (I know I do for about 2 decades now).
    Anybody else that reads/visits Tom's are usually more knowledgeable to use this "service", or at least
    are SMART enough to ask the rest of us. (which are the majority)
  • 12 Hide
    EzioAs , July 5, 2012 7:16 PM
    It's actually very simple to build a PC.
    If you don't know how to build a PC, watch NCIX Tech Tips videos on Youtube.
    If you don't know about components selection, Tom's Hardware and tons of other forums are there to help.
Other Comments
  • 14 Hide
    drwho1 , July 5, 2012 7:07 PM
    Why is this AD here on Tom's?
    Most people here already build their own systems anyways, (I know I do for about 2 decades now).
    Anybody else that reads/visits Tom's are usually more knowledgeable to use this "service", or at least
    are SMART enough to ask the rest of us. (which are the majority)
  • 7 Hide
    sixajd , July 5, 2012 7:09 PM
    CPU making strange noises? eh...
  • -1 Hide
    bjmarler , July 5, 2012 7:14 PM
    I don't know how they are going to do this. My tower CPU heatsink/fan HAS to be installed onto the mobo BEFORE it's installed in the case. Oh well, who knows?
  • 12 Hide
    EzioAs , July 5, 2012 7:16 PM
    It's actually very simple to build a PC.
    If you don't know how to build a PC, watch NCIX Tech Tips videos on Youtube.
    If you don't know about components selection, Tom's Hardware and tons of other forums are there to help.
  • -4 Hide
    shloader , July 5, 2012 7:21 PM
    This service sounds very retro... very 1997. Being it's happening in Japan makes that even more true.
  • 5 Hide
    Anonymous , July 5, 2012 7:29 PM
    Both NOTEBOOK and desktop PCs. I would love a notebook KIT just leave space for TWO thunderbolt ports or more! A SATA bay for hot swapable hard drive caddys, DVD/Blueray players etc. Ditto for descrete graphics cards!, and 4 channels of memory slots! Be sure to leave plenty of Knockouts around the notebook
    or all the necessary usb 3.0 and outher ports!
  • 9 Hide
    memadmax , July 5, 2012 7:34 PM
    "Normally with PC construction kits, the customer must personally manage a number of very specific procedures, such as system wiring, which if not performed accurately, could lead to system failure," the company said. "Performing such tasks properly typically requires a high level of computer knowledge. With this in mind, the new service provides the necessary components, while at the same time deploying instructors and technical staff to explain and support assembly."

    haha.... hahahahahahahahahaha!
    ehehe...
    heh...
  • 4 Hide
    memadmax , July 5, 2012 7:37 PM
    Eh....
    There are now only two different critical cables inside a PC: SATA, and POWER(unless you have others like internal USB headers, etc etc, but this is just an EXAMPLE).

    Their sockets won't match if you have the wrong ones, and you can't insert them backwards unless you force them....
  • -3 Hide
    kawininjazx , July 5, 2012 7:48 PM
    If I was a PC supplier, I wouldn't want people building the systems. You know how many of them put the CPU in backwards? AMD or Intel won't take back physically damaged parts. Good luck.
  • 6 Hide
    eddieroolz , July 5, 2012 8:06 PM
    Fujitsu is brave to be trying this. Let's hope things work out so other companies start offering this kind of service.
  • 1 Hide
    zak_mckraken , July 5, 2012 8:34 PM
    Sweet! I foresee more job for IT technicians out there! ;) 
  • 8 Hide
    ricdiculus , July 5, 2012 8:46 PM
    Yep... I had a cpu making to much noise once, so i let all the smoke out of the smoke operated component, and it got nice and quite! I mean just, wow.
  • 5 Hide
    DRosencraft , July 5, 2012 8:48 PM
    Although the desktop side is really late to the game, I notice that they mention notebooks. That would be interesting since I don't know anywhere you can ground up build your own laptop. I had wished forever that the same kind of DIY environment we see with desktops would migrate over to laptops. Now it's at the point where laptops might not be around all that much longer, and of all people it looks like Fujitsu is the one that decides they'll give it a shot?
  • 5 Hide
    back_by_demand , July 5, 2012 9:44 PM
    Quote:
    the motherboard will already be pre-installed to "reduce detailed processes" like using screws

    Heaven forbid anyone who thinks about building their own PC from parts do anything as remotely technical such as using a screwdriver. A chimpanzee could probably do it.
  • 0 Hide
    lp231 , July 5, 2012 10:12 PM
    Idea sound great that everyone learns, but there are some out there who thinks by building a computer automatically makes them a expert as a computer technician. It doesn't work that way, knowing how to build a computer doesn't automatically mean they know how to fix it!
    It's like a person who managed to screw in a light bulb and now he runs off telling his neighbors he can fix their electrical problems, as if the light bulb automatically make him become a electrician.
    IMO, Fujitsu probably did this is so end users get familiar with the components thus leading to better communication when they need technical support.
  • 4 Hide
    Anonymous , July 5, 2012 10:53 PM
    So many narrow minded haters. Apparently you all built notebooks all the time.. Right.

    This is marketed for elementary aged kids in Japan. I think this is a great way to get kids interested in computer technology. Ever looked up where USA ranks v Japan in technology education?
  • 3 Hide
    A Bad Day , July 5, 2012 11:21 PM
    obvious haters gonna hate obviouslyI think this is a great way to get kids interested in computer technology. Ever looked up where USA ranks v Japan in technology education?


    You would be a great asset for changing my parents' minds. They believe the key to an engineer's success is to study, not play around with DIY projects.

    To get my point across, they prohibited me from participating in any summer engineering programs or build my own projects as they saw it as a waste of time.


    And they gave me college algebra homework and an SAT study guide.

    For Christmas.
  • 0 Hide
    Deemo13 , July 5, 2012 11:30 PM
    I wonder if they would make gaming-oriented DIY
  • 1 Hide
    ricdiculus , July 6, 2012 3:18 AM
    A Bad Day.And they gave me college algebra homework and an SAT study guide.For Christmas.

    Oh man, I'm sorry, but that was funny!
  • 1 Hide
    ojas , July 6, 2012 3:52 AM
    Quote:
    to "reduce detailed processes" like using screws and plugging in the power switch connector.

    best line ever.

    Anyway, while it was kind of lame to read this for desktops, i guess it'll help the general public. I mean, my generation has grown up with computers (Windows 95 onwards), but most of them still keep calling the entire cabinet+components inside it the "CPU". Whoever knows a bit more thinks that the CPU cooler is the CPU. *sigh*

    What i really like is the idea of building your own laptop, i've always wanted to make a custom built one, nothing out there quite satisfies portability, performance and cooling at the same time, unless it empties your wallet completely.
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