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Intel Plans to Discontinue Multiple CPUs, Incl. Core i5-3450

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 41 comments

One of Intel's most popular platforms since the LGA 775 processors has now fully entered into its discontinuation phase, so let's bid farewell to Sandy Bridge.

Intel has announced the discontinuance of its highly popular Sandy Bridge processors. These processors are still among the best selling CPUs, even after the release of Ivy Bridge. They have been mainstays with overclockers and enthusiast builders since its initial release in January 2011. With Ivy Bridge in full swing and Haswell set for early 2013, Intel has started phasing out the Sandy Bridge processors. 

Intel has released the schedule for the following processors: Celeron G440, Core i5-2310, i5-2320, i5-2400, i5-2400S, i5-2405S, i5-2500, i5-2500K, i5-2500S, i5-2500T, i7-2600, i7-2600K, i7-2600S and i7-2700K. In addition, Intel has announced the discontinuance of a processor that was just recently released, the Ivy Bridge Core i5-3450 processor. 

Forecasted Key Milestones: Tray Boxed
Product Discontinuance Program Support Begins:09/24/201209/24/2012
Product Discontinuance Demand To Local Intel Rep.:12/28/2012Not Applicable
Finalize Discontinuance Assurance:01/25/2013Not Applicable
Last Corporate Assurance Product Critical Date:03/20/2013Not Applicable
Last Product Discontinuance Order Date:03/29/201303/29/2013
Orders are Non-Cancelable and Non-Returnable After:03/29/201303/29/2013
Last Product Discontinuance Shipment Date:09/27/2013While Supplies Last


All the CPUs listed are set to be available for orders through 03/29/2013, and will continue to ship while supplies last (boxed versions) or until 09/27/2013 (tray versions).

 

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  • 21 Hide
    halcyon , September 26, 2012 9:54 PM
    Ah...my beloved 2500K is on the list...at least they'll be around for another year.
Other Comments
  • 21 Hide
    halcyon , September 26, 2012 9:54 PM
    Ah...my beloved 2500K is on the list...at least they'll be around for another year.
  • 0 Hide
    rjkucia , September 26, 2012 9:54 PM
    Kind of surprising, as I didn't think they had too many Ivy Bridges for the low-end market yet.
  • 0 Hide
    hero1 , September 26, 2012 9:56 PM
    This rig that I have now will be turned into HTPC once Haswell comes out. Can't wait!
  • -9 Hide
    dalethepcman , September 26, 2012 10:01 PM
    No one can say they didn't see this coming. The 22nm chips are more profitable per unit than the 32nm chips. Because performance is stellar for either they have to be priced similar to each other, or who would buy the new one. Once the old chips are gone Intel can slowly start creeping up CPU prices again, until everyone is paying $400 for bottom end and $1000 for top end again.

    Thanks for the complete lack of competition in the CPU segment from AMD, Intel can now go back to milking its customers.
  • 5 Hide
    halcyon , September 26, 2012 10:04 PM
    dalethepcmanNo one can say they didn't see this coming. The 22nm chips are more profitable per unit than the 32nm chips. Because performance is stellar for either they have to be priced similar to each other, or who would buy the new one. Once the old chips are gone Intel can slowly start creeping up CPU prices again, until everyone is paying $400 for bottom end and $1000 for top end again.Thanks for the complete lack of competition in the CPU segment from AMD, Intel can now go back to milking its customers.
    Must you remind us how AMD let us down?
  • 2 Hide
    luciferano , September 26, 2012 10:37 PM
    I understand discontinuing the Sandy Bridge CPUs, but why are they dropping the i5-3450?

    dalethepcmanNo one can say they didn't see this coming. The 22nm chips are more profitable per unit than the 32nm chips. Because performance is stellar for either they have to be priced similar to each other, or who would buy the new one. Once the old chips are gone Intel can slowly start creeping up CPU prices again, until everyone is paying $400 for bottom end and $1000 for top end again.Thanks for the complete lack of competition in the CPU segment from AMD, Intel can now go back to milking its customers.


    An i5 at $400 with Ivy Bridge is a far inferior value to even AMD's CPUs without the core configuration and/or P state altering methods that with CPU/NB frequency overclocking, can bring any FX-81xx CPU up to par with the LGA 1155 i5s and i7s in single threaded performance. Intel isn't stupid and wouldn't do that, especially with CPU performance greater than current i5s making little impact on gaming. Even more so considering that even Phenom II and Bulldozer FX can get a steady ~60FPS in any game today even if they need overclocking to do it and they'll probably do the trick for years to come.

    AMD also has laid the plans for great performance jumps with each improvement on Bulldozer just as Intel has done with Core 2 (which is still nearly identical in CPU arch to even Ivy Bridge and probably Haswell, gains are mostly in die shrinks, cache improvements, and die integration) and how AMD did with Athlon 64 up until Bulldozer was launched.

    In fact, AMD has greater gains planned than Intel does and has made clear how they'll achieve them.
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6201/amd-details-its-3rd-gen-steamroller-architecture

    Intel will not raise prices ridiculously. They undoubtedly will rise to the challenge of a revitalized AMD and will probably make improvements in their plans to ensure that they get and stay ahead of AMD should AMD take the lead.
  • 4 Hide
    whiteodian , September 26, 2012 10:40 PM
    If Intel chips started creeping to $400 for the low end, I think I would go with AMD. I know Intel chips are better, but that's too much damn money. Hopefully you are mistaken.
  • 2 Hide
    luciferano , September 26, 2012 10:43 PM
    Quote:
    If Intel chips started creeping to $400 for the low end, I think I would go with AMD. I know Intel chips are better, but that's too much damn money. Hopefully you are mistaken.


    Intel would need to be in an extremely monopolist situation in which anti-trust laws would hammer Intel as they did in the past, except probably even more fiercely because Intel would be a re-peat offender and governments would love to fine Intel to get some money to waste. Intel is still fighting the EU over past fines to this day, so I highly doubt that Intel would risk more such problems, especially if AMD sues them and Intel has to pay AMD as well as paying fines to governments. Intel can be greedy (hey, they're a company, any other company would be out to get as much money as they reasonably can get too), but they're not stupid.
  • 8 Hide
    Anonymous , September 26, 2012 10:47 PM
    Goodnight, sweet prince.
  • 6 Hide
    raytseng , September 26, 2012 10:53 PM
    luciferanoI understand discontinuing the Sandy Bridge CPUs, but why are they dropping the i5-3450?


    I can only guess that the yields on the silicon are good enough that pretty much all the chips coming out greatly exceed the 3450 specs.
    So selling 3450 would just be a sales/marketting ploy to try to capture dead money, even though the product being sold is the same as a higher item.

    Might as well at least tell the customers you are giving them the higher item and say "free upgrade" or something like that.
  • 7 Hide
    azraa , September 26, 2012 11:00 PM
    Well its a good thing.
    Lets hope their vast variety of CPUs cleans up a little, its a mess to pick an intel cpu and people asking 'hey should I get this or that or maybe that', and gets to be a little more cohesive
    I am no AMD fanboy but AMD's namings and brandings of CPUs are actually pretty nice.
    Its way more simple to understand AMD than Intel.

    Intel gives you a quite a few locked processors within each family (i3, i5, i7) with the first number as their generation and ... honestly, I dont know that does the rest mean. Slight modifications on he multiplier of course, differences on the HD Graphics, but they have many more than AMD has. To my point of view, if you plan your performance gaps correctly, LESS IS MORE. AMD with the FX line has 4, 6 and 8 cores, but only 1 or 2 of each for every generation (currently only BD and PD) and they are all unlocked (locking or unlocking makes Intel some absolutely free earnings, with I find to be a not very ethical or competitive way to go)

    Well whatever, probably more than one out there will hate (and call names and all that childish stuff) about the AMD/Intel stupid fanboyism, but bottomline, phasing out old hardware is always good, forces the consumer to remake their idea of 'NEW' every now and then, which drives consumption for newer developments.

    Cheers c:
  • -2 Hide
    Raiddinn , September 26, 2012 11:19 PM
    I am seriously going to miss the i5-2400 and the i5-3450. I don't have either one nor have I ever had either one, but I do new builds for people in the forums all the time and these both get suggested a lot by me since they are significantly cheaper than the x5xx version of the chips with nearly the same performance. Most people don't OC anyway so they don't feel the loss in terms of their processors being unlocked or not.

    With AMD set to quit competing vs Intel for desktop processors, though, it makes sense that Intel would phase out some of its lower end options. Might as well just set the lowest quad to be the 3570k if AMD has no serious competing products in the market.
  • -2 Hide
    luciferano , September 27, 2012 12:15 AM
    rjkuciaKind of surprising, as I didn't think they had too many Ivy Bridges for the low-end market yet.


    This isn't about the low-end market CPUs, just the upper mid-ranged and high-end markets, so how is it surprising?
  • -2 Hide
    luciferano , September 27, 2012 12:18 AM
    RaiddinnI am seriously going to miss the i5-2400 and the i5-3450. I don't have either one nor have I ever had either one, but I do new builds for people in the forums all the time and these both get suggested a lot by me since they are significantly cheaper than the x5xx version of the chips with nearly the same performance. Most people don't OC anyway so they don't feel the loss in terms of their processors being unlocked or not.With AMD set to quit competing vs Intel for desktop processors, though, it makes sense that Intel would phase out some of its lower end options. Might as well just set the lowest quad to be the 3570k if AMD has no serious competing products in the market.


    Excluding the 3450, Intel is simply discontinuing older models. The 3450, as raytseng said, is probably just being dropped because it's a pretty lowly clocked model for this new line and Intel is probably not really getting many Ivy i5 dies that can't do better than the 3450. The chances of AMD having anything to do with this are slim to none.
  • 4 Hide
    tomfreak , September 27, 2012 12:26 AM
    I'll like Intel add a few more higher clocked i3 models to replace the 3450. High performance per thread is still very important thanks to lazy software developers to optimize their software for multi thread.
  • 2 Hide
    holyknight1121 , September 27, 2012 1:15 AM
    Awe man i didn't even get a Sandy Bridge yet. Still on Conroe.
  • 5 Hide
    InvalidError , September 27, 2012 1:17 AM
    dalethepcmanOnce the old chips are gone Intel can slowly start creeping up CPU prices again, until everyone is paying $400 for bottom end and $1000 for top end again.

    Considering how much of a commodity computing power has become, this is highly unlikely. Even though AMD may be "far behind" Intel in per-core performance, AMD's chips are still vastly sufficient for most everyday tasks and gaming so if Intel wants to keep selling new CPUs, they have to keep their markup within sane margins.

    Also, many people like myself do not feel like we are hurting for faster CPUs even with our venerable Core2Duo/Core2Quad CPUs. With today's Core i3/5/7, the number of people who can make-do with 5-7 years old CPUs is going to become much greater and Intel will have to make a good enough proposition to convince people like me to upgrade even though we do not need it.

    Another obstacle to Intel jacking up prices the same way they did around Y2k is that lots of non-(PC-)gamers are doing an increasingly large chunk of their everyday computing on mobile devices. If Intel tried to make people cough up $300 for a low-end CPU, most of those people would give up on owning a PC and use the money for a more powerful smartphone or tablet.

    While people may not have too many options for x86-based computing, they do have plenty of options to take their general computing needs elsewhere so Intel cannot afford to drive people away from x86 by turning excessively greedy.
  • 3 Hide
    Darkerson , September 27, 2012 2:44 AM
    Love my i5-2500K more and more every day, but I do hope AMD comes out with something decent by the next time I upgrade. Heres' to wishful thinking.
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