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ISP with Geo-location Work-around Ditches 'Global Mode'

By - Source: FYX | B 15 comments
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FYX ditches 'Global Mode' service one week after launch.

Earlier this week, a new internet service provider from New Zealand made headlines when it revealed that it would offer customers a way around those annoying region-specific blocks that render some websites unavailable in certain countries. However, it seems FYX ('fix') has done an about face on its highly publicized 'global mode' and will no longer offer customers the ability to circumvent region-blocks.

"FYX has a made a decision to withdraw its popular ‘global mode’ service from the market for the time being," the company wrote on its website. "FYX sincerely apologises to our customers and the New Zealand internet community for putting a halt to ‘global mode,’ which will happen tonight at 11.59pm."

The ISP says that though legal opinions 'have supported FYX's global mode,' there are matters that require further consideration. The company said it is currently contacting customers regarding its decision to pull its 'Global Mode.'

FYX launched on Friday, May 4, and caused quite a stir in the blogosphere. The first ISP to ever offer such a service, FYX's 'Global Mode' would have allowed customers to access geo-blocked sites. The company never mentioned specific sites nor did it promise access to every blocked site. It also noted in its FAQ that customers should still abide by the terms and conditions of the services they wanted to access.

With 'Global Mode' gone, FYX still has one unique feature left, in that it operates using Pay As You Go billing. Customers pay $30.30 for their connection each month and are then charged $0.30 per GB that they use. This represents a drop in price compared to earlier this week, when 'Global Mode' was still available. At launch, FYX charged $34.34 per month and $0.34 per GB used.

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Top Comments
  • 13 Hide
    iceman1992 , May 11, 2012 6:21 PM
    This is really too bad. I felt very strongly for that feature. I think that was a step in the right direction.
    Region blocks are ridiculous! I live in Indonesia and I get angry when "This video is not available in your country" appears on youtube (just one example). The internet is supposed to be without borders.
  • 12 Hide
    Nakal , May 11, 2012 6:27 PM
    Is there even remotely a valid reason to block content on the internet based on where you are from anymore? I mean, why, why would you not want to have customers from all over the world..?
  • 10 Hide
    freggo , May 11, 2012 6:41 PM
    "$0.30 per GB"

    You've got to be kiddin' me...
Other Comments
  • -1 Hide
    hokkdawg , May 11, 2012 6:20 PM
    Yikes, at $.30/GB, I'd have monthly bills nearing $200 (vs. $70 currently). Oh well, still cheaper than buying BluRays... :p 
  • 13 Hide
    iceman1992 , May 11, 2012 6:21 PM
    This is really too bad. I felt very strongly for that feature. I think that was a step in the right direction.
    Region blocks are ridiculous! I live in Indonesia and I get angry when "This video is not available in your country" appears on youtube (just one example). The internet is supposed to be without borders.
  • 12 Hide
    Nakal , May 11, 2012 6:27 PM
    Is there even remotely a valid reason to block content on the internet based on where you are from anymore? I mean, why, why would you not want to have customers from all over the world..?
  • 6 Hide
    iceman1992 , May 11, 2012 6:37 PM
    NakalIs there even remotely a valid reason to block content on the internet based on where you are from anymore? I mean, why, why would you not want to have customers from all over the world..?
    Yes the licensing rights. Local media providers don't like having competitors from other countries. But that's just annoying. They should get in line with the internet age, not use geographical position as a competitive advantage.
  • 10 Hide
    freggo , May 11, 2012 6:41 PM
    "$0.30 per GB"

    You've got to be kiddin' me...
  • 2 Hide
    pacioli , May 11, 2012 8:37 PM
    If it seems too good to be true it probably is.
  • 3 Hide
    bison88 , May 11, 2012 9:39 PM
    freggo"$0.30 per GB"You've got to be kiddin' me...



    Hell I'm surprised the article didn't focus around this part. $30 for the connection then an additional $.30 per GB when ISP's get that bandwidth for a couple of pennies (literally). Reminds me of the ridiculous Text message costs on your phones where if you don't have a plan you pay $.10 to $.20 or more per text sent or received and these guys make a killing ripping others off knowing it actually uses less of the network than a second of a phone call.

    Damn shame we got tot his point when 10 years ago everyone was just happy to be able to break out of the dial-up curse now being locked back down with lies, deceit, and greed.
  • 0 Hide
    bv90andy , May 11, 2012 9:45 PM
    iceman1992Yes the licensing rights. Local media providers don't like having competitors from other countries. But that's just annoying. They should get in line with the internet age, not use geographical position as a competitive advantage.


    That's what I don't get. Companies like Fox or any other channel that produces tv shows should just put them on the WorldWideWeb and make a company like google adsense that gives personalized ads according to geo. location. How hard would it be for Hulu to show personalized ads in every most countries out there?
  • 1 Hide
    Gamer-girl , May 11, 2012 10:30 PM
    freggo"$0.30 per GB"You've got to be kiddin' me...

    You think that was bad, the only other company that offered pay-as-you go here was Xnet $34.95 per month plus $1 per GB. Then there were other ISPs that charged $2 per GB excess if you go over your small cap - most caps here are under 100GB per month.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , May 12, 2012 12:14 AM
    $0.30 per GB is cheap here in New Zealand, considering 100GB will cost you $30,most ISPs charge over $100 per month for that and thats just adsl2.
  • 0 Hide
    freggo , May 12, 2012 7:05 AM
    NakalIs there even remotely a valid reason to block content on the internet based on where you are from anymore? I mean, why, why would you not want to have customers from all over the world..?


    All sorts of reasons.
    The product you ar e selling may be to heavy to ship economically (Books for example).
    Or illegal to ship to certain places (or requiring too much paper work like export licenses); high end computer parts to 'rogue' nations for example.

    Medical shipments... For example, Cat's claw is a herb you can buy OTC in the USA. However, in some countries it is available only by prescription. So why bother dealing with 'visitors' that use up bandwidth surfing your site if you could not accept their order anyway ?

  • 0 Hide
    iceman1992 , May 12, 2012 7:56 AM
    freggoAll sorts of reasons.The product you ar e selling may be to heavy to ship economically (Books for example).Or illegal to ship to certain places (or requiring too much paper work like export licenses); high end computer parts to 'rogue' nations for example.Medical shipments... For example, Cat's claw is a herb you can buy OTC in the USA. However, in some countries it is available only by prescription. So why bother dealing with 'visitors' that use up bandwidth surfing your site if you could not accept their order anyway ?
    No no no I believe Nakal was talking about content. Not physical goods. Content as in movies, music..
  • 0 Hide
    Antha , May 12, 2012 8:37 AM
    Something to consider:
    Some companies block IPs from outside their country from seeing their site/products because the content is illegal, or at least a dangerous grey zone in other countries e.g. Japanese firms worry about the implications of lollitas abroad.
  • 0 Hide
    anti-painkilla , May 14, 2012 2:48 AM
    Firstly "FYX has a made a decision to withdraw its popular ‘global mode’ service from the market for the time being,". How is it popular if noone has heard of FYX. They have not done a great marketing campaign.

    Secondly the pricing $0.30 per GB up until 2 months ago was competitive. New plans from NZ ISP's are a little under 10c/GB.
  • 0 Hide
    ynhockey , May 18, 2012 12:56 PM
    iceman1992Yes the licensing rights. Local media providers don't like having competitors from other countries. But that's just annoying. They should get in line with the internet age, not use geographical position as a competitive advantage.


    Many web hosts in smaller countries block other countries for increased security. I've worked in the hosting industry, and you'd be surprised how well this works. Just blocking China and Russia significantly reduces the stress. Small business sites usually don't care about customers outside of their country or at most their country + the United States.