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Seagate Launching "Industry's First" 4TB HDD

By - Source: Seagate PR | B 54 comments

Seagate has released a new GoFlex Desk external drive sporting a sleek new look and a fat 4 TB of storage. That's enough space to contain over 2,000 HD movies, claims the company.

Tuesday night Seagate said it's now shipping the industry's first 4 TB 3.5-inch HDD via the new GoFlex Desk 4TB external drive. In addition to its massive storage capacity, the HDD also showcases a new look for the GoFlex family, sporting a streamlined, industrial (and less round) design that "better reflects the aesthetic of today’s modern offices" while retaining a smaller footprint than its predecessors. The entire line of GoFlex Desk products will also adopt the new industrial design in the coming weeks, the company said.

"Yet another industry first for Seagate, we have reached a new high-capacity in the 3.5-inch hard drive form factor. At Seagate, we are committed to pushing the limits for our customers and will continue to adapt and innovate our products based on customer needs," said Patrick Connolly, vice president and general manager of Retail products for Seagate. "This latest GoFlex® Desk drive offering, with its new industry-leading capacity point, is a statement of our continued commitment to meet consumer needs."

Available soon online and at brick-and-mortar retailers for a meaty $249.99 USD, the 4 TB external drive will come pre-loaded with backup software (with 192-bit Triple DES encryption), a USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 adapter base with a lighted capacity gauge (seen left, and a 5-foot USB 2.0 or 3.0 cable. The overall size of the unit will be 6.22 x 4.88 x 1.73-inches.

Seagate said that the new 4 TB drive can be used on both the PC and Mac platforms without formatting, but reformatting to HFS+ requires the use of backup software for Mac or Time Machine software. The company also plans to release an additional GoFlex Desk for Mac external drive featuring both FireWire 800 and USB 2.0 by the end of the month, slated specifically for Apple stores.

System requirements include Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP (32–bit & 64–bit) operating system or Mac OS X operating system 10.4.9 or higher, a USB 2.0 or 3.0 port.

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Top Comments
  • 14 Hide
    kal326 , September 7, 2011 7:38 PM
    jacobdrjI wish I could sell my home-movies for 10 bux a pop...Think: Uncompressed, 15 minute long, videos of your kids lifetime accomplishments, like 1st steps and Bar Mitzvah...

    A change in material focus and a 18+ age requirement would probably net you home movies worth $10 or more.
  • 14 Hide
    Camikazi , September 7, 2011 7:18 PM
    hallsCost for this drive: $249.Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.

    If you buy them yes :p  my guess is Seagate knows that most who fill this with 2,000 HD movies probably won't do it legally, but just won't come out and say it :) 
  • 14 Hide
    jacobdrj , September 7, 2011 7:08 PM
    Keep pushing capacity... I am glad the SSD revolution isn't stymieing HDD evolution...
Other Comments
    Display all 54 comments.
  • 14 Hide
    jacobdrj , September 7, 2011 7:08 PM
    Keep pushing capacity... I am glad the SSD revolution isn't stymieing HDD evolution...
  • 12 Hide
    afrobacon , September 7, 2011 7:09 PM
    I feel like this capacity should have been available a while ago. Anyway, +1 to Seagate for being the first.
  • 7 Hide
    julius 85 , September 7, 2011 7:10 PM
    Since when does a HD movie take up 2GB?
  • 9 Hide
    halls , September 7, 2011 7:12 PM
    Cost for this drive: $249.
    Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.
  • 14 Hide
    Camikazi , September 7, 2011 7:18 PM
    hallsCost for this drive: $249.Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.

    If you buy them yes :p  my guess is Seagate knows that most who fill this with 2,000 HD movies probably won't do it legally, but just won't come out and say it :) 
  • 5 Hide
    Anonymous , September 7, 2011 7:19 PM
    @julius 85

    H264......
  • 9 Hide
    MMXMonster , September 7, 2011 7:21 PM
    julius 85Since when does a HD movie take up 2GB?

    When they are ripped from BluRay using x264 codec. Videos can be anywhere from 2gig up.
  • 2 Hide
    JasonAkkerman , September 7, 2011 7:23 PM
    hallsCost for this drive: $249.Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.


    A Blu-Ray copy can be as much as 20+GB. You can compress the hell out of it and get it below 2GB. Maybe most people won't notice the difference on a (up to) 36" TV, but for some of use, we enjoy quality and do as little compression as possible. I make ISOs out of my DVDs, and haven't really found a solution I like for HD content, so I just use the discs.

    Maybe the introduction of this 4TB drives will allow me to build that 20TB NAS I have been thinking about without breaking the bank.
  • 0 Hide
    jacobdrj , September 7, 2011 7:27 PM
    hallsCost for this drive: $249.Cost of 2,000 HD movies (if each movie is $10): $20,000.

    I wish I could sell my home-movies for 10 bux a pop...
    Think: Uncompressed, 15 minute long, videos of your kids lifetime accomplishments, like 1st steps and Bar Mitzvah...
  • -5 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , September 7, 2011 7:37 PM
    NEVER use a big HDD. Best is to split into smaller ones, preferrably with backups. I use a 500GB drive in my PC, and it only has installed programs and games on it - the movies/photos/music are on the external drives. (That way I also won't ever need any "cloud"... because my drives can be connected to any of my PCs, lol)

    Plus 4 TB would be a pain in the neck to fill up even with USB 3.0... and I don't even have 1 TB of data! :D 
  • 14 Hide
    kal326 , September 7, 2011 7:38 PM
    jacobdrjI wish I could sell my home-movies for 10 bux a pop...Think: Uncompressed, 15 minute long, videos of your kids lifetime accomplishments, like 1st steps and Bar Mitzvah...

    A change in material focus and a 18+ age requirement would probably net you home movies worth $10 or more.
  • 6 Hide
    noblerabbit , September 7, 2011 7:41 PM
    I could get four x 2TB (= 8 TB) Samsung Spinpoint drives for the price of this seagate 4TB drive.

    that's 4 Terabytes free! does anyone know what that means?
  • 3 Hide
    Anonymous , September 7, 2011 7:46 PM
    @noblerabbit

    The MPIAA, RIAA and Comcast would like a chat with you ?
  • 13 Hide
    Anomalyx , September 7, 2011 7:52 PM
    You know what's annoying? Measuring a measurable amount using an arbitrary unit. I could make tons of 1-second-long HD movies and that would skyrocket the count. I could also take very long HD movies and that would plummet the count. Same goes for photos, mp3's, etc.
    Just say 4 TB and leave it at that...
  • 5 Hide
    Zenthar , September 7, 2011 8:05 PM
    Just give us decently priced NAS supporting RAID5 and let us use whatever size HDD we want ...
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , September 7, 2011 8:16 PM
    @amk-aka-phantom huh what? should I be scurred? I just fired up a dell R510 I picked up from ebay with 2x 146GB 15k cheetahs for boot and packed it with 12x2tb SATAs for storage in Raid6 for my home media server that will live in the garage. I also have a cheap little eSATA 4 bay enclosure with 4 x 2TB in a software raid 5 that has been running for about 2 years without a hitch, although it's getting close to full.

    If you could attain USB 3 speeds, and not be bottle necked by the controller USB3 should, in theory, outperformance 3Gb/s SATA, but not quite up to 6Gb/s SATA. I have a kingston thumb drive that does 125MB/s in both directions which out be perfectly fine if this drive could match that.

    Personally I like single platter drives for data due to less heat, quieter, and generally higher MTBF, but I usually go for what is big and cheap and raid it. What you said about never use a big HDD is just silly. I have a box at work with about 200 8-20GB drives in there that eventually I'm supposed to break out the drill and destroy, do you want them instead?

    As far as this thing? Meh, I'll wait for 4TB internals. hmm 12x4TB in my R510 would be me enough room for over 1000 Blu-ray images assuming 40GB each, although across my current 250ish blu-ray images they are average out to about 25-30GB. WOohooo! hurry up 4TB internals.
  • 3 Hide
    threefish , September 7, 2011 8:41 PM
    Quote:
    the 4 TB external drive will come pre-loaded with backup software (with 192-bit Triple DES encryption)


    Triple DES is nothing more three applications of 56-bit DES (for a total of 168-bits in the keyspace). DES is EXTREMELY slow, I would never use it to encrypt 4TB of data. With Intel's recent addition of native instructions for AES, it would seem to be the only logical cipher to choose for this application.
  • 3 Hide
    TeraMedia , September 7, 2011 8:44 PM
    I got a 3 TB external for ~$120 earlier this year. I don't remember the exact price, but two of those is still cheaper than this. You pay a steep premium for the highest-density drives and unless you really need that right now, it is never worth it. These things lose value like discrete GPUs, only worse. No thanks.
  • 1 Hide
    drwho1 , September 7, 2011 9:15 PM
    I'm glad that there is finally a 4TB drive, now just wait until 4TB bare drives are available, then wait about a year for them to come down to about $100-125 and I might buy then.

    I currently have 6 2TB drives and 1 1TB drive on my PC and they are all with "breathing problems". (FULL)

    So obviously I would like to get my hands on 6 of this drives when the price is right. (it will be soon enough)
  • 1 Hide
    Wish I Was Wealthy , September 7, 2011 9:24 PM
    They'll be a lot of porno addicts happy about seeing this I suspect.
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