Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Google to Offer Google Fiber Internet in Olathe, Kansas

By - Source: Google Fiber Blog | B 17 comments

It's your lucky day, Olathe.

Google has been hinting at plans to expand its Google Fiber broadband service for months. Back in December Eric Schmidt said the company was trying to decide where to go next. In January, Schmidt and CEO Larry Page and CFO Patrick Pichette again talked about the possibility of expanding the experimental broadband service beyond Kansas City testbed. Yesterday, Google announced that it would be rolling out Google Fiber to Olathe, Kansas. 

"A few minutes ago, the Olathe City Council approved an agreement to bring Google Fiber to their city. Olathe has become one of the fastest-growing cities in Kansas and has attracted an influx of new businesses and residents," Google said in a blog post. "They’ve all noticed what a great community Olathe is, and so have we. We think that Fiber and widespread Internet access will help to create jobs, grow local businesses, and make Olathe even stronger as it grows."

Obviously, with the agreement only approved yesterday, there's still a long way to go before the residents of Olathe see any Google Fiber action. The search giant says that once it gets the planning and engineering work underway, it will announce details of construction and pre-registration.

Contact Us for News Tips, Corrections and Feedback

Discuss
Display all 17 comments.
This thread is closed for comments
Top Comments
  • 12 Hide
    daswilhelm , March 21, 2013 9:20 AM
    and the 6 people who live there rejoice!
Other Comments
  • 3 Hide
    falchard , March 21, 2013 9:12 AM
    Can you imagine the utility lines with google? 3 bare black utility lines, and a line at the bottom with 13 ads per span.
  • 12 Hide
    daswilhelm , March 21, 2013 9:20 AM
    and the 6 people who live there rejoice!
  • -2 Hide
    internetlad , March 21, 2013 9:21 AM
    falchardCan you imagine the utility lines with google? 3 bare black utility lines, and a line at the bottom with 13 ads per span.

    dohoho.


    Is the Google Fiber a free or paid service? Not to sound paranoid, but the basic way google makes it's money is (as noted above) ad revenue and by selling information to ad companies. Where are the profit margins on Fiber if it's free?
  • 5 Hide
    COLGeek , March 21, 2013 9:23 AM
    Not exactly the Wizard of Oz's Kansas anymore....People with ruby red slippers rejoice!
  • 8 Hide
    borisof007 , March 21, 2013 9:33 AM
    internetladdohoho.Is the Google Fiber a free or paid service? Not to sound paranoid, but the basic way google makes it's money is (as noted above) ad revenue and by selling information to ad companies. Where are the profit margins on Fiber if it's free?


    They have both a basic free internet service and their 1gb internet service, they also offer an internet/tv combo which is pretty awesome too.

    I wish this was more widespread, but, baby steps first.
  • 6 Hide
    mobrocket , March 21, 2013 9:39 AM
    plus as google adds fiber, they give the schools in that area free fiber and computers

    which is pretty neat
  • 3 Hide
    helldog3105 , March 21, 2013 9:39 AM
    Actually daswilhelm Olathe is a fairly large suburb of Kansas City with an approximate population of 130,000. I live in Olathe, and I can tell you that it isn't a small community of just 6 people. It's not the best place to live in the area but it isn't as bad as, say the Wyandotte County area has been. We'll see how this goes, as I don't have much faith in Google as an internet service provider. It probably won't ever reach me. Surewest stopped literally 3 blocks from my street. Jerks... Comcast has a stranglehold on the town and charges ludicrous pricing for their services. Internet without the speed boost is 74.99 a month through them for 18Mbps speed. Uverse is 44.99 for the same, but there are line issues in our neighborhood and we lose service for 2-3 hours a day. Which is unfeasible for me as I do remote desktop support.
  • 6 Hide
    daswilhelm , March 21, 2013 9:50 AM
    Quote:
    Actually daswilhelm Olathe is a fairly large suburb of Kansas City with an approximate population of 130,000. I live in Olathe, and I can tell you that it isn't a small community of just 6 people. It's not the best place to live in the area but it isn't as bad as, say the Wyandotte County area has been. We'll see how this goes, as I don't have much faith in Google as an internet service provider. It probably won't ever reach me. Surewest stopped literally 3 blocks from my street. Jerks... Comcast has a stranglehold on the town and charges ludicrous pricing for their services. Internet without the speed boost is 74.99 a month through them for 18Mbps speed. Uverse is 44.99 for the same, but there are line issues in our neighborhood and we lose service for 2-3 hours a day. Which is unfeasible for me as I do remote desktop support.



    i was being facetious.
  • -5 Hide
    thecolorblue , March 21, 2013 10:25 AM
    100% of your network traffic activity recorded & databased by Google

    the price is way too high at "free" with spying all the time.
  • -1 Hide
    puddleglum , March 21, 2013 11:06 AM
    Expanding already? How much of Kansas City do they have connected so far? I thought they only started. It can't be more than 10%. Are they going to skip the less affluent areas as has become the norm? Welcome to the ISP world.
  • 3 Hide
    samanosuke47 , March 21, 2013 11:20 AM
    I hope to live to see the day when I can get any kind of residential fiber here in WV.
  • 3 Hide
    TheLighterHalf , March 21, 2013 11:21 AM
    Getting mine in Fall of this year! They haven't finished any full neighborhoods yet but they are currently working on three on the western end of the city. I live in KC but work near Olathe. Just wish they'd hook this stuff up faster, I'm so sick of Time Warner and I want my new TV and fiber service!
  • 3 Hide
    TheLighterHalf , March 21, 2013 11:24 AM
    Also, they're going by number of people signed up by neighborhood. So if a neighborhood had a high percentage of people that signed up, they go first. So it's not just number of people but the percentage of people in certain areas that signed up. Neighborhoods had to have at least 10% in their area sign up to qualify at all.
  • 3 Hide
    Avus , March 21, 2013 11:50 AM
    I don't mind watch some ad if I can have 1Gb up/down, no data cap, 1TB google drive... for $70/month.
  • 2 Hide
    BulkZerker , March 21, 2013 12:41 PM
    helldog3105Actually daswilhelm Olathe is a fairly large suburb of Kansas City with an approximate population of 130,000. I live in Olathe, and I can tell you that it isn't a small community of just 6 people. It's not the best place to live in the area but it isn't as bad as, say the Wyandotte County area has been. We'll see how this goes, as I don't have much faith in Google as an internet service provider. It probably won't ever reach me. Surewest stopped literally 3 blocks from my street. Jerks... Comcast has a stranglehold on the town and charges ludicrous pricing for their services. Internet without the speed boost is 74.99 a month through them for 18Mbps speed. Uverse is 44.99 for the same, but there are line issues in our neighborhood and we lose service for 2-3 hours a day. Which is unfeasible for me as I do remote desktop support.


    Well here's hoping you get some of that sexy Google Fiber to your door. Maybe, EVENTUALLY, it'll force Crapcast and ATT to stop being overpriced and unreliable.

    Maybe I should move that way...
  • 0 Hide
    falchard , March 21, 2013 2:57 PM
    Google has an unfair advantage when it comes to offering internet. They are just offering internet. This means they can dedicate completely to the internet which most ISP provide additional services that take up the majority of the signal. For instance Cable can only offer 8 of its 153 pathways to internet service. A large chunk is taken providing legacy support for direct line in set-top. Another chunk is taken offering 1000 channels no one watches, and 1 pathway is taken offering telephone. If they offered all 153 purely for internet type networking, than it would be possible to have speeds up to 4.5 GB/s. In fact it would probably be wiser to use this type of setup to offer all services using an on-demand type viewing experience so the customer does not have to fiddle with DVRs. It would also require a huge datacenter for each ISP.
  • 0 Hide
    helldog3105 , December 21, 2013 9:24 AM
    Quote:

    Well here's hoping you get some of that sexy Google Fiber to your door. Maybe, EVENTUALLY, it'll force Crapcast and ATT to stop being overpriced and unreliable.

    Maybe I should move that way...


    Actually Comcast and ATT have been canvassing our neighborhood lately. It appears they are frightened by Google. I signed up on their website to indicate my interest in fiber so we'll see how that goes. I know Google held a town meeting style thing to answer questions and talk about requirements for service, but I missed it due to work. Comcast is flogging their Xfinity service which offers 200Mbps service and TV, but it's even more expensive than their standard package after their promotion expires. ATT has increased speeds on their UVerse as well to 50Mbps in our area as well, but their price didn't increase. Last I heard though Google was stalled in installation due to rights of ownership for the utility poles.