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Hitachi Ships Industry's Fastest 10K RPM HDD

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 34 comments
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It's the industry's fastest 10,000 RPM enterprise HDD.

Hitachi GST said Monday that it shipped the Ultrastar C10K600, the industry's fastest and most power-efficient 10,000 RPM enterprise class HDD.

Crammed into a 2.5-inch form factor, the new drive uses a dual-port 6 Gb/s SAS interface and reportedly delivers up to 15-percent better random and 18-percent faster sequential performance than competing products. Hitachi also claims that the drive needs 22-percent less power during operation, and is the only one it its class to use a 64 MB cache to optimize the read/write response times.

According to Hitachi, the drive offers average seek times as low as 3.7-milliseconds while the fast rotational speeds reduce average latency time to 3.0-milliseconds. Other features include the optional Bulk Data Encryption for hard-drive-level data security, halogen-reduced components, Fluid Dynamic Bearing motors, Rotational Vibration Safeguard technology and more.

"The Ultrastar C10K600 is closely aligned with customer requirements for increased performance, improved server/storage density, greater power efficiency and lower total cost of ownership," said Brendan Collins, vice president of Product Marketing, Hitachi GST. "We are proud to establish new power and performance benchmarks with our latest Ultrastar drives, while delivering to customers the proven quality and reliability they have come to expect from Hitachi."

Hitachi said that the drives are now shipping worldwide and have been qualified by select OEMs. Although prices weren't provided, the drive will arrive in three capacities: 300 GB, 450 GB, and 600 GB.

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  • 0 Hide
    eklipz330 , October 11, 2010 10:41 PM
    anyone want to clarify why someone would want this over an SSD? Is price the only problem? the new sandforce drives are around the corner...
  • 1 Hide
    jerreece , October 11, 2010 10:47 PM
    Interesting. Would love to see performance data compared to the new SSD's just for giggles. Plus knowing the retail price would be nice too. This could be an exciting product, or it could be a waste depending on price vs performance compared with SSDs.
  • 2 Hide
    icepick314 , October 11, 2010 11:12 PM
    eklipz330anyone want to clarify why someone would want this over an SSD? Is price the only problem? the new sandforce drives are around the corner...


    main reason would be cost per GB...

    SSD is FAST but most people won't be able to afford anything bigger than 128GB...

    with magnetic drives, you still have fast access especially in RAID while having 300GB or more while having price that's more affordable than SSD....
  • Display all 34 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    nforce4max , October 11, 2010 11:12 PM
    The only advantage that 10k rpm drives is sequential writes and slightly faster access times but that is all. The spindle motors are what worry me. For servers it is best to do a raid of just a few SSD for paging and os then leave mechanical for storage in another raid.
  • 1 Hide
    mikem_90 , October 11, 2010 11:23 PM
    nforce4maxThe only advantage that 10k rpm drives is sequential writes and slightly faster access times but that is all. The spindle motors are what worry me. For servers it is best to do a raid of just a few SSD for paging and os then leave mechanical for storage in another raid.


    Most of the 10k RPM and Server drives in general I've seen tend to last a good long while. Old ones might whine a bit, but so did the server drives back in the 90s that were 5400 and 7200 rpms. Heck, I still have some old SCSI drives from back then that still work.
  • 3 Hide
    w3k3m , October 11, 2010 11:30 PM
    eklipz330anyone want to clarify why someone would want this over an SSD? Is price the only problem? the new sandforce drives are around the corner...


    The difference in price is huge. You shouldn't compare it with standard MLC based SSDs, as MLC based SSD would degrade very quickly with an enterprise server usage pattern. For the price of an SLC based SSD with comparable capacity and performance, you can probably buy a brand new (small) car. Not many companies are ready to shell out that much money.


    Not many companies would
  • 3 Hide
    gmarsack , October 11, 2010 11:36 PM
    eklipz330anyone want to clarify why someone would want this over an SSD? Is price the only problem? the new sandforce drives are around the corner...

    Databases. No way are SSD (currently) going to survive the random reads/writes of a large database with multiple connections. SSD's are not designed for this application. Other than that though, not much.... lol
  • 2 Hide
    tu_illegalamigo , October 11, 2010 11:44 PM
    gmarsackDatabases. No way are SSD (currently) going to survive the random reads/writes of a large database with multiple connections. SSD's are not designed for this application. Other than that though, not much.... lol


    Absolutely, the ideal solution is usually a mix in my experience. With both deployed together you get a good rounded solution when it comes to accessing and storing data and still having a foot in both doors, so to speak.
  • -1 Hide
    Marco925 , October 11, 2010 11:46 PM
    eklipz330anyone want to clarify why someone would want this over an SSD? Is price the only problem? the new sandforce drives are around the corner...

    Some people aren't so capable of maintaining an SSD drive. they wouldn't know to move the random read-write operations to a platter drive, for those types of people, it's perfect.
  • 0 Hide
    tu_illegalamigo , October 11, 2010 11:52 PM
    Anyone on here own an SLC SSD? not me :( 
  • -1 Hide
    thillntn , October 12, 2010 12:01 AM
    Brand name still scares me, I know this is a new product but I have replaced countless hitachi drives in the past....
  • 0 Hide
    borisof007 , October 12, 2010 12:17 AM
    tu_illegalamigoAbsolutely, the ideal solution is usually a mix in my experience. With both deployed together you get a good rounded solution when it comes to accessing and storing data and still having a foot in both doors, so to speak.


    I have a candidate that worked at Samsung, he is a SQL DBA. They were testing prototype database setups using FULL SSD solutions. He said they were blazing fast, but you'd have to hot swap SSD's because they would die out after a while.
  • 2 Hide
    eddieroolz , October 12, 2010 12:40 AM
    Why this product is still relevant: SSDs can't handle the massive read/writes that it will have to contend with in a large server. It would quickly wear the cells out.
  • 3 Hide
    physical , October 12, 2010 12:54 AM
    I would like to see a benchmark throwdown between this and a WD Velociraptor.
  • 2 Hide
    blarneypete , October 12, 2010 2:41 AM
    thillntnBrand name still scares me, I know this is a new product but I have replaced countless hitachi drives in the past....
    Hitachi consumer drives are poo, but their enterprise drives are very high quality.
    physicalI would like to see a benchmark throwdown between this and a WD Velociraptor.
    Velociraptor is fast, but I wager when you throw it in as a contender against proper server-class SAS drives, it will lose by a fair margin.
  • 0 Hide
    dEAne , October 12, 2010 3:10 AM
    Hope the price is good.
  • 2 Hide
    thillntn , October 12, 2010 3:35 AM
    Ou can thumbs down me all you want,but after the whole scsi firmware issue I went cheetah and didn't look back.kudos if 10 years later they got it right.
  • 2 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , October 12, 2010 5:07 AM
    Not that a WEI score means anything useful, but I'm curious as to what Windows 7 would rate this hard drive as.
  • 2 Hide
    toughbook , October 12, 2010 5:13 AM
    tu_illegalamigoAnyone on here own an SLC SSD? not me


    I do. I have a Intel 32GBSSDSLCG1 that I have my W7 OS on. Runs like an Intel is built to run. I have a total of 5 SSD'S in my aresnal, I would never consider going back to spinners. That is like listening to a great tune on a cassette then hearing it on a CD. After doing so, you would never put yourself thru that again. These companies are trying to hang on to the traditional HDD's as long as they can, there demise is not far off. Just wait and see what 2011 brings us!
    I will admit this though. Of all the HDD'S I used to use, I never had 1 Hitachi go bad on me. That is who Panasonic uses in there Toughbooks if you don't choose the SSD option. Panny must know something when you look at there failure rate compared to the plastic throwaway laptops produced for the mass market these days.
  • 0 Hide
    back_by_demand , October 12, 2010 7:18 AM
    Above details fairly concise
    Apart from
    Transfer speeds
    ...
    Why?
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