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HTC's Rumored M7 Handset Detailed

By - Source: Unwired View | B 32 comments

Full HD 4.7-inch screen with a pixel density of 468 PPI and 1.7GHz quad-core Snapdragon processor integrated.

HTC's rumored quad-core-powered M7 smartphone has been detailed with specifications for the device leaked.

The M7 will purportedly have a full HD 4.7-inch screen with a pixel density of 468 PPI (pixels-per inch). For some perspective, if that's true, it would be around 40 percent sharper than the current iPhone 5's Retina display (326 PPI). The new SoLux display is said to be visibly better than the previous Super LCD2 display in regards to outdoor visibility, viewing angles and color accuracy.

Powering the smartphone is apparently a 1.7GHz quad-core Snapdragon processor, accompanied by 2 GB of RAM, 32 GB of internal flash storage and a 2300mAH battery. Similar to the One X+, there doesn't seem to be any method to expand the storage memory. As for an operating system, it's expected to ship with Jelly Bean, but which version exactly is unclear.

The rear camera, meanwhile, boasts a 13MP image sensor and a f/2.0 lens. The front camera has a 2MP lens, with both cameras said to be able to record 1080p video. The new image sensor ("Cinesensor") also sports super slow-motion and video HDR.

In addition to the visual upgrades, the M7 will launch with enhanced sound abilities. The speaker is designed by the Dr. Dre-branded sound technology, Beats, while "Clear Words" technology is said to make phone conversations easier to hear.

4G LTE connectivity is also rumored, as is a next-gen Wi-Fi 802.11ac connection that is said to be three times faster than the current 802.11n WLAN wireless technology.

Launch date or pricing details wasn't leaked, but the device should make an appearance at CES in January or the Mobile World Congress the following month.

 

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  • 11 Hide
    Thunderfox , December 22, 2012 6:07 AM
    Why do they continue to build phones, especially high end ones, without expandable storage? It's ridiculous.
Other Comments
  • 11 Hide
    Thunderfox , December 22, 2012 6:07 AM
    Why do they continue to build phones, especially high end ones, without expandable storage? It's ridiculous.
  • 5 Hide
    doive1231 , December 22, 2012 6:44 AM
    Perhaps HTC should have released these phones before Christmas instead of just rumours to mitigate the sales losses.
  • -4 Hide
    kitsunestarwind , December 22, 2012 7:03 AM
    I'm sick of seeing phones with higher screen specs and such, Make me a nice simple to use phone with a good enough screen that i don't have to charge every night (or run in power saving modes to make it last 2 days)
  • -5 Hide
    kensingtron , December 22, 2012 8:13 AM
    kitsunestarwindI'm sick of seeing phones with higher screen specs and such, Make me a nice simple to use phone with a good enough screen that i don't have to charge every night (or run in power saving modes to make it last 2 days)


    1. Pixel density doesn't really affect battery life

    2. I think we'll just have to wait for next gen batteries to arrive to see that

    3. In the mean time get a phone with removable battery
  • 4 Hide
    Uberragen21 , December 22, 2012 8:14 AM
    kitsunestarwindI'm sick of seeing phones with higher screen specs and such, Make me a nice simple to use phone with a good enough screen that i don't have to charge every night (or run in power saving modes to make it last 2 days)

    Charging a phone every night is never an issue. It's like taking meds; you get into a habit and you don't worry about it. As for lasting a whole day on moderate usage, that's another story. I believe the new Snapdragon processor uses the A15 design, which should help it to be more efficient than the A9 predecessor and last 8-10 hours on moderate to heavy usage (at least that's the hope).
  • 5 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , December 22, 2012 9:51 AM
    Instead of superhigh PPI, would it be better to have 720P screens, but with brighter backlights and better color representation ?
  • 6 Hide
    samoanbiscuit , December 22, 2012 10:09 AM
    kensingtron1. Pixel density doesn't really affect battery life2. I think we'll just have to wait for next gen batteries to arrive to see that3. In the mean time get a phone with removable battery

    Actually pixel density does affect battery life. Denser pixels require a brighter backlight to produce images with equivalent brightness, meaning the screen (or more specifically, it's backlight) becomes more power hungry
  • 7 Hide
    samoanbiscuit , December 22, 2012 10:10 AM
    mayankleoboy1Instead of superhigh PPI, would it be better to have 720P screens, but with brighter backlights and better color representation ?

    If HTC understood this, maybe they wouldn't be so dramatically outsold by Samsung and Apple.
  • 5 Hide
    spentshells , December 22, 2012 10:11 AM
    The battery is WAY to weak to run that phone with normal use for 1 day
  • 0 Hide
    samoanbiscuit , December 22, 2012 10:12 AM
    Uberragen21Charging a phone every night is never an issue. It's like taking meds; you get into a habit and you don't worry about it. As for lasting a whole day on moderate usage, that's another story. I believe the new Snapdragon processor uses the A15 design, which should help it to be more efficient than the A9 predecessor and last 8-10 hours on moderate to heavy usage (at least that's the hope).

    The A15s are actually more power hungry than the A9s, it's the smaller process nodes most of them are made on that provide the power savings. ARM's plan is to have SoCs that use A15 and A7s on the same die (BIG.little or something like that) to reduce power usage.
  • 4 Hide
    CaedenV , December 22, 2012 10:36 AM
    kitsunestarwindI'm sick of seeing phones with higher screen specs and such, Make me a nice simple to use phone with a good enough screen that i don't have to charge every night (or run in power saving modes to make it last 2 days)

    how long it lasts largely depends on how you use it. I just picked up a 920 the other day, and with my obsessive sorting of contacts all day every day I have only had to top off the battery in the evening. Once I get done filtering my work contacts in then I will probably be able to have the battery last for 2 days on a charge... but then again, with wireless charging who cares? Just slap it on it's pad in the evening and you have your charge for the next day.
  • 5 Hide
    CaedenV , December 22, 2012 10:46 AM
    kensingtron1. Pixel density doesn't really affect battery life2. I think we'll just have to wait for next gen batteries to arrive to see that3. In the mean time get a phone with removable battery

    1) Pixel density absolutely affects battery life, more pixels means more work for the CPU and GPU, which means more drain on the battery.
    2) Phones are still working on getting smaller (or at least thinner). I think we have a good 3 years of seeing ever 'thinner' phones that have a similar battery life to current gen phones. The other thing we are seeing are massively higher performing GPU and CPUs in phones with every gen, completely wiping out any battery gains that are to be had. Lastly, with each new phone gen we find exponentially better standby battery life, but with worse 'heavy use' battery life. So for light to moderate users we will see small battery life gains over the next few years, but heavy users will see worse battery life. But in 3-5 years when phones finally slow down to performance increases in line with moore's law then we will see a real focus on raw efficiency and 'good enough' processors to increase battery life more dramatically (much like Intel's current strategy right now).
    3) Agreed, if it is such a problem then get a phone with a replaceable battery, or else get a case or cover that has an extended battery. One of my friends just picked up an S3 with a battery case and he gets 2-3 days on a charge now even with heavy use, and the case does not add that much bulk to the phone.
  • 5 Hide
    Uberragen21 , December 22, 2012 11:19 AM
    samoanbiscuitThe A15s are actually more power hungry than the A9s, it's the smaller process nodes most of them are made on that provide the power savings. ARM's plan is to have SoCs that use A15 and A7s on the same die (BIG.little or something like that) to reduce power usage.

    You are incorrect sir. According to every article I've read states the A15 is less power hungry than the A9. You can go one of two ways with this power efficiency, faster processor and keep the same power consumption, or same speed and better battery life.

    However, yes the smaller fabrication used on the A15 (28nm vs 40nm on the A9 Snapdragon) is more power efficient due to the smaller fab size. So you have a two fold lower power consumption model there. Smaller fabrication + more efficient processor design.

    If you aren't aware, AMD recently introduced their Piledriver based CPUs and they still use the same 32nm fab, but are about 15-20% more power efficient EVEN at a higher processor speed.

    Food for thought...
  • 4 Hide
    SchizoFrog , December 22, 2012 11:56 AM
    I'm sick of people complaining about battery life every time there is a phone article, it is what it is. You are getting a device that has that latest and greatest technology hardware and then complain that they don't last as long as old style mobiles. That is like buying a super car to replace your economical one and then complaining because it guzzles the petrol. You are not buying a smart phone for its battery, but for what it can do. If you want long lasting performance try buying an old style phone instead,
  • -6 Hide
    getreal , December 22, 2012 12:05 PM
    More POS android devices. YAWN.
  • 4 Hide
    -Jackson , December 22, 2012 12:11 PM
    Quote:
    I'm sick of people complaining about battery life every time there is a phone article, it is what it is. You are getting a device that has that latest and greatest technology hardware and then complain that they don't last as long as old style mobiles. That is like buying a super car to replace your economical one and then complaining because it guzzles the petrol. You are not buying a smart phone for its battery, but for what it can do. If you want long lasting performance try buying an old style phone instead,

    Agreed. I'm sick and tired of people constantly complaining about even a 2000mAh+ battery, that's more than enough to last them a day of heavy use.
    Hell, I'm sporting an HTC 7 Trophy with a 1300mAh battery.. A lot of you shouldn't even be complaining.
  • 2 Hide
    wemakeourfuture , December 22, 2012 1:22 PM
    Uberragen21Charging a phone every night is never an issue. It's like taking meds; you get into a habit and you don't worry about it. As for lasting a whole day on moderate usage, that's another story. I believe the new Snapdragon processor uses the A15 design, which should help it to be more efficient than the A9 predecessor and last 8-10 hours on moderate to heavy usage (at least that's the hope).


    I agree, but its funny how everyone blasted Apple's original iPhone which required a charge every day compared to existing phones that were running days on a single charge. Now every manufacturer is comfortable with a battery life comparable to what Steve Jobs even took push-back from his own people at Apple.
  • 4 Hide
    daleos , December 22, 2012 3:52 PM
    To all those who think their battery lasts them just fine, well I've never been comfortable with the battery life of any of my smartphones. On a typical day with 2x 40 min commutes (ebook reading) and about 15 mins of calls a day, my phone barely makes it through the day. If I ever plan to stay in town for anything then the extra few hours will mean I have a boring commute home with a dead phone. So, I've always carried a spare battery around with me and sometimes even a second. I don't consider 1.3 hours worth of e-book reading 'heavy use'. There's simply no leeway if for whatever reason I don't have access to charge my phone overnight which happens regularly for me. My next phone either has to last 2 days with my current usage or it needs to have a removable battery.

    Why should I consider a portable charging device as a suitable repalcement for a replacable battery? They're 4 times the size, cost 4 times the amount, carry about the same amount of charge but take 3+hours to actually make the phone useful again.
  • 2 Hide
    bustapr , December 22, 2012 5:36 PM
    SchizoFrogI'm sick of people complaining about battery life every time there is a phone article, it is what it is. You are getting a device that has that latest and greatest technology hardware and then complain that they don't last as long as old style mobiles. That is like buying a super car to replace your economical one and then complaining because it guzzles the petrol. You are not buying a smart phone for its battery, but for what it can do. If you want long lasting performance try buying an old style phone instead,

    theres some flaws in your argument. its great that mobile phone tech is still rising but that doesnt mean battery life should be kept at a mediocre level. phones can already do alot as they are now, I think OEMs can afford to take a break from the speed race and focus on battery life for a gen.

    this question would probably spark fury from people here, but why would you want more powerful phones? what would you do with all the extra power that cant already be done fast? you could say graphics and games, but from what Ive seen here on toms, most people that want more powerful phones dont quite enjoy touch control gaming on tiny phones.

    so, what do you want to do on the phone? when a rich guy buys a Lambo, he enjoys it and shows it off to everyone. a short while after, the new car smell dies off, and he starts getting irritated with stopping for gas often. he switches off to a bmw, which gets him from place to place, is less flashy, is less fast but still quite fast, and is many times more gas efficient. which would be the best option?(this was a phone analogy thing...)
  • 0 Hide
    bejabbers , December 22, 2012 6:36 PM
    WANT! Please come out in Canada!
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