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HP Providing Fanless Haswell Tablet Later This Year

By - Source: Engadget | B 13 comments

An HP representative told Engadget that the company has developed a tablet reference design featuring a fanless fourth-generation Intel Core "Haswell" processor. It was actually on stage during Intel's press conference at Computex 2013 in Taipei, but the media was more focused on Intel's own version. HP plans to make an official announcement soon, and an actual tablet and/or hybrid product release later this year.

Intel Executive Vice President Tom Kilroy acknowledged earlier this week that the PC of the past is dying, that the 2-in-1 "hybrid" form factor is becoming the new norm: a laptop when you need it and a tablet when you want it. More than 50 designs are in the works, powered by either the company's fourth-generation Core "Haswell" or Atom "Silvermont" chips.

He said Haswell is the industry's first PC SoC and the company’s first chip specifically designed for 2-in1 form factors and Ultrabooks. It has 50 percent better battery life under active workloads, and up to 13 days of standby time compared to four days with Ivy Bridge. Some versions will have a 6 watt power rating, he said, and then presented a thin, fanless tablet to show what's possible with a 6-watt Core processor.

The presentation indicated that now thanks to Haswell, consumers do not have to choose between high-performance, multi-tasking PCs, and thin, lightweight, touch-focused tablets. Consumers should expect to see these 2-in-1 form factors with low-power Haswell chips around September to October.

Intel already offers "Clover Trail" and the upcoming "Bay Trail" Atom chips for tablets that don’t require cooling. However the current Surface Pro tablet sports an Intel "Ivy Bridge" Core i5 processor that actually does require active cooling. That said, a fanless Intel Core portable chip wasn't expected until Haswell's successor, Broadwell, arrives in the next few years.

Could these fanless Intel Core tablets be using liquid cooling despite the low power requirement? Just recently NEC introduced the first smartphone with such a feature, the Media X N-06E. It consists of a liquid-filled heatpipe that pulls heat away from a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 quad-core SoC, and disperses it all via a graphite "radiator" through the phone's polycarbonate exterior. The system board is also designed to disperse the heat.

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  • 0 Hide
    iamadev , June 10, 2013 8:34 AM
    Shut and take my money
  • 4 Hide
    pbrigido , June 10, 2013 8:44 AM
    I absolutely love my Surface Pro, but I would love for it to be fanless. Not that it makes a lot of noise under workload, but the fewer mechanical parts on my computers, the better.
  • 0 Hide
    pbrigido , June 10, 2013 8:45 AM
    I absolutely love my Surface Pro, but I would love for it to be fanless. Not that it makes a lot of noise under workload, but the fewer mechanical parts on my computers, the better.
  • 0 Hide
    pbrigido , June 10, 2013 8:47 AM
    I absolutely love my Surface Pro, but I would love for it to be fanless. Not that it makes a lot of noise under workload, but the fewer mechanical parts on my computers, the better.
  • 3 Hide
    tburns1 , June 10, 2013 9:15 AM
    So ...what do you think about your Surface Pro? :) 
  • 3 Hide
    danwat1234 , June 10, 2013 9:23 AM
    Using a heatpipe is not liquid cooling, otherwise I could say that my 4 year old gaming laptop came from the factory with liquid cooling.
  • 1 Hide
    danwat1234 , June 10, 2013 9:23 AM
    Using a heatpipe is not liquid cooling, otherwise I could say that my 4 year old gaming laptop came from the factory with liquid cooling.
  • -1 Hide
    danwat1234 , June 10, 2013 9:24 AM
    delme
  • 4 Hide
    teh_chem , June 10, 2013 9:29 AM
    Quote:
    So ...what do you think about your Surface Pro? :) 


    LOL. If only Tom's could fix this bug. Hitting refresh after submitting a response just re-posts your response. How hard could that be to fix?
  • -1 Hide
    dextermat , June 10, 2013 10:06 AM
    I smell something burning
  • 1 Hide
    stevejnb , June 10, 2013 10:37 AM
    A move in the right direction, but call me a skeptic. Current Win 8 pro tablets have fans that are hardly that obtrusive and, as someone who has been a mobile PC gamer for over a decade, I've seen more than a few laptop designs that have heating that is *barely* adequate for the hardware put into the machine, if it could even considered to be so. I've had gaming laptops that were more or less only useable in basement suites or in the winter, and even then only when they were elevated in such a manner so as to have maximum surface area exposed.(I'm looking at you Toshiba Qosmio of about 2007!)

    As for HP specifically, their current crop of tablets have less RAM and a general weaker component profile for the same price point as some of their competitors. I do want Windows 8 tablets without active heating involved, but I'm going to watch and wait until maybe the second or third generation of such devices before I jump in. As already stated, current gen tablet fans just aren't that obtrusive.

    Also, get the price down. Full Windows 8 tablets are generally superior in functionality to iOS and Android devices but at 2 to 3 times the price, what the heck are these hardware manufacturers expecting?
  • 0 Hide
    Valentin_N , June 10, 2013 10:45 AM
    Interesting. From what I have seen the Y models with 6W TDP will be very expensive (over 300$) so I wonder if they will make it to the market. I know I won't buy a smartphone for over 500$; for 600$ or more I would purchase an ultrabook with 15W or more and why not one with nvidia 740.
  • 0 Hide
    pbrigido , June 10, 2013 11:40 AM
    I absolutely love my Surface Pro, but I would love for it to be fanless. Not that it makes a lot of noise under workload, but the fewer mechanical parts on my computers, the better.