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Microsoft Announces InstaLoad Battery Tech

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 57 comments

Sometimes the smallest technological developments make a big difference.

It's not a big deal, but it is annoying. You check the little positive and negative markings on the battery cover (if they're there at all) and then you put them in the wrong way around anyway. Sure, taking them out and switching them around isn't going to make you late for your lunch date, but it's something you'd like to avoid if at all possible.

Thanks to Microsoft, it is. Microsoft recently debuted a new technology called InstaLoad, which involves doubling the number of contacts in the battery compartment. By including a set of positive and negative contacts at both ends of the compartment (instead of a single positive contact at one end and a single negative contact at the other end), Microsoft has enabled users to cram batteries in any way they like. This should come in particularly handy when changing batteries in the dark.

Microsoft is licensing the technology out to any and all third-party device suppliers and already counts Duracell on its list of licensees. If companies want to license the technology for accessibility products aimed at people with vision or learning disabilities, Microsoft is willing to license the technology royalty-free.

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Top Comments
  • 34 Hide
    TheDuke , July 7, 2010 1:19 AM
    how has this never been thought of
    damn we all suck
  • 29 Hide
    blurr91 , July 7, 2010 1:14 AM
    Crap!!! This is one of those "why didn't I think of that" ideas.
  • 28 Hide
    beayn , July 7, 2010 1:09 AM
    Cool, I need this for my wife and grandmother who keep putting the batteries in wrong!
Other Comments
  • 28 Hide
    beayn , July 7, 2010 1:09 AM
    Cool, I need this for my wife and grandmother who keep putting the batteries in wrong!
  • 27 Hide
    rmmil978 , July 7, 2010 1:11 AM
    Simple tech that'll probably turn more of a profit for them in the long term than the Xbox 360.
  • 25 Hide
    jomofro39 , July 7, 2010 1:11 AM
    Coming next! Cars where you can spray gasoline wherever you want and it runs!
  • 29 Hide
    blurr91 , July 7, 2010 1:14 AM
    Crap!!! This is one of those "why didn't I think of that" ideas.
  • 34 Hide
    TheDuke , July 7, 2010 1:19 AM
    how has this never been thought of
    damn we all suck
  • 7 Hide
    IFLATLINEI , July 7, 2010 1:21 AM
    Designed for the same people who need those directions on shampoo bottles.

    fortehluls - Really? Was this supposed to be funny?
  • 16 Hide
    dj1001 , July 7, 2010 1:25 AM
    it really good of them to license it out for free.

    this is something people will really appreciate.
  • 8 Hide
    tntom , July 7, 2010 1:27 AM
    You could do the same by using a bridge rectifier. I've done it many times on small circuits which could be harmed by reverse voltage. Just use 4 diodes with a low voltage drop.
  • 11 Hide
    darthvidor , July 7, 2010 1:34 AM
    what's next? interchangeable left/right shoes?
  • 6 Hide
    eklipz330 , July 7, 2010 1:37 AM
    great but ehh..

    ..let me know when microsoft announces instacharge battery technology
  • 6 Hide
    cembung , July 7, 2010 1:42 AM
    @weirdguy99 its murphy's law. if there is more than one ways to do something and one of it is wrong, then someone dull enough is going to do it. This battery is designed to have no wrong ways.
  • -6 Hide
    Emperus , July 7, 2010 1:52 AM
    What is meant by "Microsoft is willing to give the license royalty free".!! Were there expectations of charges to be paid for this..!! Anyway, this is a push towards creating idiocracy on the note of making life more simpler.. Now people don't need to learn the basics with battery terminals also.. This will certainly help in raising peoples IQ.. Nicely done..
  • -1 Hide
    drutort , July 7, 2010 1:58 AM
    tntomYou could do the same by using a bridge rectifier. I've done it many times on small circuits which could be harmed by reverse voltage. Just use 4 diodes with a low voltage drop.


    ya but this doesnt do jack vs putting - to - or + to + on batteries, it does not correct the flow of current :p  what your describing is the final polarity not hte polarity between batteries

    and yes like others said, i cant believe it has not been thought of and why didnt i think of it :p 
  • 1 Hide
    IzzyCraft , July 7, 2010 2:08 AM
    Quote:
    If companies want to license the technology for accessibility products aimed at people with vision or learning disabilities, Microsoft is willing to license the technology royalty-free.


    What microsoft having a heart, has to be a trick! haha

    I thought we could already do this it was just a matter of adding cost onto a device that stopped this. W2go microsoft apparently...
  • -6 Hide
    willgart , July 7, 2010 2:45 AM
    is it the first opensource product from Microsoft? :) 
  • 0 Hide
    Spike53 , July 7, 2010 2:45 AM
    If you can't figure out how to place your batteries in devices even by looking at the diagram, natural selection isn't doing its job.
  • 5 Hide
    Pyroflea , July 7, 2010 2:55 AM
    Nice, now I can just be lazy and not even look at the things I'm cramming batteries in to :D 
  • 1 Hide
    nukemaster , July 7, 2010 3:05 AM
    I am betting it was not done before because many changing/discharging(device it self) systems run the batteries in a series. That being said its much cheaper to use a single metal plate to connect the + and - on 2 batteries then to use some complex system.

    I see the point above about diodes, yes that would work very well, but over 4 batteries and one per battery, that's a fair loss in voltage.

    Its about time batteries are fully fool proof :) 
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