Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Intel Announces Dual-Core HyperThreaded Atom for Phones

By - Source: Intel | B 27 comments

During MWC 2012, Intel revealed a new dual-core Atom chip with 4 hyperthreads that will appear in smartphones next year.

After revealing the 32-nm single-core Atom Z "Medfield" series (the Z2460) last month during CES 2012 (which now supports up to 2 GHz), Intel has officially added two more chips to its Atom Z lineup: the dual-core Z2580 and the single-core Z2000.

On Monday during MWC 2012, Intel said that the latter low-power Atom Z2000 chip, featuring a single core clocked at 1 GHz, will be aimed squarely at the "value" smartphone market (AKA sub-$200). It will support Intel's XMM 6265 3G HSPA+ modem with Dual-SIM 2G/3G, a 300 MHz graphics core, 720p playback and up to an 8MP rear facing camera. Intel plans to sample the Z2000 chip in mid-2012 with customer products scheduled by early 2013.

As for the Atom Z2580, it will come with two cores clocked at 1.8 GHz and accompanied by four hyperthreads, acting as virtual cores, so that the SoC can split its power more effectively by designating one thread to any given task. Intel is hoping that hyperthreading will offset any gains made by Nvidia and Qualcomm's quad-core products while also delivering better power and battery efficiencies thanks to the 32-nm architecture (Tegra 3 is a bigger 40-nm).

Intel also added that the new Atom Z2580 will come packed with a dual-core graphics core clocked at 533 MHz built into the Penwall SoC architecture, and an "advanced multimode LTE/3G/2G solution." Intel plans to sample the Z2580 in the second half of the year with customer products scheduled in the first half of 2013.

In addition to the two new Atom Z announcements, Intel said that it plans to outpace Moore's Law by shipping 22-nm SoCs for carrier certification next year, and that it's already in development on 14-nm SoC technology. The company also revealed the XMM 7160, an advanced multimode LTE/3G/2G platform with support for 100 Mbps downlink and 50 Mbps uplink, and support for HSPA+ 42Mbps. Intel will sample the product in the second quarter with customer designs scheduled to launch by the end of 2012.

The XMM 6360 platform, a new slim modem 3G HSPA+ solution supporting 42Mbps downlink and 11.5Mbps uplink for small form factors, is currently being sampled, Intel said.

Discuss
Display all 27 comments.
This thread is closed for comments
  • 6 Hide
    Yuka , February 27, 2012 10:05 PM
    This is what I like about competition... If there were no competition on the smartphones, I bet Intel would give us a single core Atom at the low end and this with a holy-cow-price premium on top; if at all they'd care about smartphones, lol.

    Hope ARM and friends don't hold back on Intel and keep the lead.

    Cheers!
  • 6 Hide
    omega21xx , February 27, 2012 10:07 PM
    The 1ghz single core model won't be released until 2013 in products? That's a little too late as there are plenty of budget dual core phones out now and will only be more by then.
  • -1 Hide
    LuckyDucky7 , February 27, 2012 10:12 PM
    Yes, but can it run Crysis Mobile?

    Anyways. It's good to see some x86 development come for smartphones; now that Android runs on x86 and Windows 8 soon to be released- I don't want an ARM version of Windows that can't run the programs I want, but the x86 version of it running on a tablet? That's certainly a better investment than anything ARM technology has to offer right now.
  • 4 Hide
    killerchickens , February 27, 2012 10:19 PM
    Isn't it 2 threads and 2 hyperthreads not 4 hyperthreads?
  • 0 Hide
    burnley14 , February 27, 2012 10:31 PM
    I wouldn't doubt that this is the beginning of the end of of ARM's reign on the mobile space. Intel is simply too advanced, already producing 14nm chips and 3D transistors that will so drastically reduce power consumption. Once they gain a foothold they are going to plow over the competition. It may be several years from now, but that's what I foresee.
  • 7 Hide
    kyuuketsuki , February 27, 2012 10:43 PM
    Why don't they hyperthread the single-core model? A cheap SoC with a single physical thread but two logical threads would seem a good solution to the low-end smartphone market.
  • 0 Hide
    omega21xx , February 27, 2012 10:53 PM
    Turns out dual core (4 thread) chip will have the PowerVR 544 which is a step up from the GPU in the iPhone (almost double the performance from what I've heard). When this comes out I'll finally stop hearing "the iPhone has the best GPU! IT'S TEH BEST FONE EVA!!!!1111"
  • 0 Hide
    vilenjan , February 27, 2012 10:55 PM
    I love Intel, thier cpu cant compete with ARM in terms power draw, but they have the manufacturing tech in the world, the new 22nm tri-gate process will make up for a lot of power differential vs TCMS's 28nm.
    Where windows goes, intel follows, welcome to the WINTEL dominion.
  • 5 Hide
    Unolocogringo , February 27, 2012 10:57 PM
    That is what some people dont get. Intels Reaserch and Developement budget is probably as much as AMDs or ARM'swhole operating budgets.
    Intel has some of the brightest minds the world has to offer in its research labs not including funding for college research projects in which they benefit also.
    I have AMD and INTEL machines. They serve their intended purposes well. So no flaming.
  • -3 Hide
    __-_-_-__ , February 28, 2012 12:06 AM
    5seconds battery time. atoms are really efficient (not.)
  • 4 Hide
    Anonymous , February 28, 2012 12:50 AM
    Atoms have excellent efficiency. Not sure what you are talking about. Even the netbook Atoms run 8 to 12 hours if you don't use the nVidia ION chipset. The ION chipset is the battery guzzler. My netbook consistently runs all day on 1 charge (12 hours). These are ATOM SoCs so they are a great deal more efficient. They are probably not quite as efficient as ARM which is why they have to perform better in benchmarks. I'll bet they are pretty close though in terms of efficiency.
  • 0 Hide
    A Bad Day , February 28, 2012 1:31 AM
    What architecture does the Medfield has?
  • 0 Hide
    omega21xx , February 28, 2012 1:41 AM
    A Bad DayWhat architecture does the Medfield has?

    x86, it's just a tweaked atom from a netbook to be blunt.
  • 0 Hide
    livebriand , February 28, 2012 2:09 AM
    Papa BusterAtoms have excellent efficiency. Not sure what you are talking about. Even the netbook Atoms run 8 to 12 hours if you don't use the nVidia ION chipset. The ION chipset is the battery guzzler. My netbook consistently runs all day on 1 charge (12 hours). These are ATOM SoCs so they are a great deal more efficient. They are probably not quite as efficient as ARM which is why they have to perform better in benchmarks. I'll bet they are pretty close though in terms of efficiency.

    But in a phone, standards change. Atom is fast by those standards, but you also need lots of battery life to go with it (and the battery is smaller).
  • 4 Hide
    rantoc , February 28, 2012 2:58 AM
    livebriandBut in a phone, standards change. Atom is fast by those standards, but you also need lots of battery life to go with it (and the battery is smaller).


    With the latest atom already fitting the power budget of phones - then a 22 shrink with 3gate it will be a heavy player. Its not without reason the Arm ceo continuously try to downplay Intels achievements, he is running scared of the giant that now have awoken with a focus. I would not be surprised if Arm goes down in history much like Amd have, both had superior products but then got outpaced by the insanely huge r&d and manufacturing capability of Intel.
  • 1 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , February 28, 2012 5:17 AM
    omega21xxTurns out dual core (4 thread) chip will have the PowerVR 544 which is a step up from the GPU in the iPhone

    The SGX544 is pretty much identical to the SGX543...
  • 0 Hide
    omega21xx , February 28, 2012 5:32 AM
    It's got twice the shader performance according to anandtech. Didn't look into it too much as gpu for phone gaming is... Well pointless to me. :/  can't stand not having legitimate controls (using wiimote VIA Bluetooth doesn't cut it)
  • 1 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , February 28, 2012 6:08 AM
    Omega21XXIt's got twice the shader performance according to anandtech.

    Umm, no it doesn't. The specs are the same, and at comparable core counts and clock speeds the SGX544/543 perform identically. The only difference is the SGX544 supports DX9.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/4413/ti-announces-omap-4470-and-specs-powervr-sgx544-18-ghz-dual-core-cortexa9

    "As an aside, the difference between SGX543 and SGX544 is purely that full DirectX 9 compliance is offered in the latter, making it a possible shoe-in for future Windows 8 platforms."
  • 0 Hide
    omega21xx , February 28, 2012 6:16 AM
    "The CPU isn't the only part of the SoC to get an upgrade: Intel equipped the Z2580 with a PowerVR SGX 544MP2 GPU running at 533MHz. The SGX 544 is similar to the 543 used in Apple's A5, however it adds support for Direct3D 9_3. At 533MHz you can expect roughly twice the shader/compute performance of the 543MP2 that's in the A5. Granted by early next year we'll likely see competitive, if not faster GPUs implemented in SoCs (quite possibly long before then)."

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/5592/intel-atom-z2580-z2000

    :) 
  • 1 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , February 28, 2012 6:38 AM
    Omega21XX"The CPU isn't the only part of the SoC to get an upgrade: Intel equipped the Z2580 with a PowerVR SGX 544MP2 GPU running at 533MHz. The SGX 544 is similar to the 543 used in Apple's A5, however it adds support for Direct3D 9_3. At 533MHz you can expect roughly twice the shader/compute performance of the 543MP2 that's in the A5. Granted by early next year we'll likely see competitive, if not faster GPUs implemented in SoCs (quite possibly long before then)."http://www.anandtech.com/show/5592 [...] 2580-z2000

    ... "The specs are the same, and at comparable core counts and clock speeds the SGX544/543 perform identically."

    Ya, it's clocked significantly higher in that implementation. The SGX 544 is not inherently any faster then the 543. It'll definitely perform better if you clock it higher then the SGX543 you're comparing it to, but it's about as profound as saying an SGX543 clocked twice as high as another SGX543 will provide roughly twice the performance.
Display more comments