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Intel Xeon E5-2690 Sandy Bridge-EP Performance Revealed

By - Source: TechPowerUp | B 17 comments

TechPowerUp received a "leaked" presentation that allegedly details Intel's Sandy Bridge-EP platform, along with early performance numbers.

Intel is taking its newly launched Core i7 Sandy Bridge-E platform to the enterprise market with a new line of Xeon processors. Intel's new enterprise variations include the Sandy Bridge-EN and Sandy Bridge-EP. The Sandy Bridge-EN is designed for high-density, low-power servers, while the Sandy Bridge-EP is designed for high-performance servers and workstations. The Sandy Bridge-EP is multi-socket capable platform. 


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The Sandy Bridge-EP appears to be basically the same design as the Sandy Bridge-E, but has several additional features not found with the Core processors. The Sandy Bridge-EP offers two QuickPath Interconnect (QPI) links, which utilize QPI 8.0 GT/s. This will help facilitate high-bandwidth inter-socket communication in multi-socket systems, up to eight cores, sixteen threads enabled by HyperThreading, and up to 20 MB of L3 cache memory. Sandy Bridge-EP will utilize a quad-channel DDR3 integrated memory controller (DDR3-1600 MHz) with support up to 768 GB of memory, via two sockets, eight DDR3 channels in all, LRDIMMs. In addition, Intel Integrated I/O has support for up to 80 lanes of PCIe 3.0.

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Image Leaked by TechPowerUpImage Leaked by TechPowerUp



Intel claims up to 80 percent performance boost versus its prior generation Westmere-EP platform. Using a Xeon X5690 six-core processor (@ 3.64 GHz) as the baseline, Intel put its new Xeon E5-2690 eight-core processor (@ 2.90 GHz) to the test. Performance results showed an improvement across the board on all testing; OLTP Database (TPC-C Oracle), Middle-Tier Java (SPECjbb 2005), Integer Throughput (SPECint_base2006), Floating Point Throughput (SPECfp_rate_base2006), Memory Bandwidth (STREAM_MP Triad), and Matrix Multiplication (Linpack).

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Intel provided details on its new Data Direct I/O Technology (DDIO). DDIO works to increase I/O performance by up to 2.3 times that of previous generation, reduces latency and allows system memory to remain in low power state.

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Top Comments
  • 11 Hide
    friskiest , December 28, 2011 4:04 PM
    I honestly feel bad whenever I read Intel "leaks" and comparisons for their upcoming chips since they almost always deliver on the promise and hype,.

    AMD so far never get past the hype with its Bulldozer,. a repeat performance from their Piledriver should essentially seal off AMD from the x86 market.

    To AMD,. please give us the same joy with the release of Athlon 64,.
    Alot probably gave up on you,. but there's always a second chance..
Other Comments
  • 7 Hide
    theuniquegamer , December 28, 2011 3:23 PM
    Nice specs it 768gb RAM support my pc has only 500gb hdd. Lol
  • 5 Hide
    jgutz2006 , December 28, 2011 3:37 PM
    I'm excited to see benchmarks/comparisons to latest Opterons and their own Westmere Xeons.
  • Display all 17 comments.
  • -6 Hide
    dgingeri , December 28, 2011 4:01 PM
    Personally, I like the look of that SB-EN chip. It's not as overblown as the SB-E: 3 memory channels, 8 cores, 20MB cache, 24 PCIe3 lanes (3 x8 slots would be nice for 3 way SLi without overdoing it, maybe using a bridge chip to change those to x16 PCIe2), and a single QPI link. It's meant for single socket designs. We already know the quad channel memory config doesn't help anything. Triple channel memory would be fine. (Works fine for my 920.) I just hope it's not too overpriced.
  • 11 Hide
    friskiest , December 28, 2011 4:04 PM
    I honestly feel bad whenever I read Intel "leaks" and comparisons for their upcoming chips since they almost always deliver on the promise and hype,.

    AMD so far never get past the hype with its Bulldozer,. a repeat performance from their Piledriver should essentially seal off AMD from the x86 market.

    To AMD,. please give us the same joy with the release of Athlon 64,.
    Alot probably gave up on you,. but there's always a second chance..
  • 8 Hide
    doron , December 28, 2011 4:32 PM
    dgingeriPersonally, I like the look of that SB-EN chip. It's not as overblown as the SB-E: 3 memory channels, 8 cores, 20MB cache, 24 PCIe3 lanes (3 x8 slots would be nice for 3 way SLi without overdoing it, maybe using a bridge chip to change those to x16 PCIe2), and a single QPI link. It's meant for single socket designs. We already know the quad channel memory config doesn't help anything. Triple channel memory would be fine. (Works fine for my 920.) I just hope it's not too overpriced.


    I really don't see the point of talking about the advantages / disadvantage of these platforms from an end-user perspective as these are meant for servers. Quad channel is really most beneficial for various server uses.
    Going back to the end-user, enthusiasts finally have the opportunity to create a rather large RAM-Disk thanks to 64gb support of the SB-E platform (thanks to quad channel config).
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , December 28, 2011 5:06 PM
    I want a dual core 2600 with a 3 card FireGL solution and quad striped SSD configuration. I wonder what that would cost me? 10k for a workstation setup? It would no doubt be louder than crap but what a whopper that thing would be. The kind of research I could do on that baby though. Wow!
  • 7 Hide
    newbie_mcnoob , December 28, 2011 5:43 PM
    So this is where the two disabled cores from Sandy Bridge-E went.
  • -1 Hide
    BSMonitor , December 28, 2011 6:56 PM
    Quote:
    So this is where the two disabled cores from Sandy Bridge-E went.


    Yup!
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , December 28, 2011 7:04 PM
    A true Bulldozer ....to bad it's running on lower Ghz compared to the 6core. What would be the difference if you overclock a 6 vs 8 core(starting from lower Ghz) not much I think. Nevertheless a beast and useful for professional applications since most of them still don't benefit from parallel GPU computing power.
  • -4 Hide
    Rock_n_Rolla , December 28, 2011 8:00 PM
    WOW! Looks very interesting! :-) Imagine installing TWO XEON E5-2600 procs on an EVGA SR3
    dual LGA2011 slot X79 mobo and OC it to 4.7ghz with 64 gigabyte of 2000+ mhz RAM and TWO
    Radeon 7970 3GB video cards on Xfire?.. That would make my After Effects / Sony Vegas Pro
    video editing, Cinema 4D renders and gaming experience more exciting and faster than ever!

    - Cant wait for EVGA's SR3 mobo and Intel's XEON E5-2600 release! :-)
  • 0 Hide
    stingstang , December 28, 2011 9:56 PM
    Where's the smart-alec who claims that this is an old article?
  • 1 Hide
    tomfreak , December 28, 2011 11:32 PM
    3960x should have be 8 cores, not many would prefer to pay $400 for 3MB cache.
  • 0 Hide
    PreferLinux , December 29, 2011 3:06 AM
    Rock_n_RollaWOW! Looks very interesting! :-) Imagine installing TWO XEON E5-2600 procs on an EVGA SR3dual LGA2011 slot X79 mobo and OC it to 4.7ghz with 64 gigabyte of 2000+ mhz RAM and TWO Radeon 7970 3GB video cards on Xfire?.. That would make my After Effects / Sony Vegas Pro video editing, Cinema 4D renders and gaming experience more exciting and faster than ever! - Cant wait for EVGA's SR3 mobo and Intel's XEON E5-2600 release! :-)

    Don't you mean 96 GB? And FOUR 7970s or whatever NVIDIA comes up with? And why only overclock to 4.7, especially as you would obviously be water cooling?
  • -1 Hide
    Rock_n_Rolla , December 29, 2011 5:08 AM
    freenss

    @ Freenss

    Yes, 96GB and four 7970's or maybe TWO 7990's are possible with SR3 but i dont know
    if i could afford it, as for the cooling system yes im planing to install water cooling in
    a Xigmaek Elysium case where the SR3 could fit nicely to achieve a much higher OC,
    since the XEON E5-2600 has 8 cores and 16 threads, installing two of it on an EVGA's SR3
    would result in a 32 processing threads that i can utilize on my After Effects previews
    specially when im editing HD videos and adding effects together with Sony Vegas Pro.
    It will also help me a lot on my Cinema 4D renders, AND for other USERS who's work
    is similar to what i do specially those freelance 3d artist and into digital film effects
    needing to have a much faster system, this will give them the processing power they
    need to make their work faster instead of buying bulky setup very expensive render
    servers.

    Although this setup is a bit expensive and not suitable for others, and for my very long
    term use and to make my work faster i think its worth it. IMO :-)


    - Advance Happy New Year to All! :-)
  • 0 Hide
    Rock_n_Rolla , December 29, 2011 5:13 AM
    Correction, i meant @ PreferLinux :-)
  • 0 Hide
    jkflipflop98 , December 29, 2011 7:47 AM
    BSMonitorYup!

    newbie_mcnoobSo this is where the two disabled cores from Sandy Bridge-E went.


    lol nope. Two totally different masks.
  • 0 Hide
    eddieroolz , December 29, 2011 10:25 PM
    While on paper (img 1) Sandy Bridge-EP seems like not much of an upgrade, the performance numbers are quite staggering. 2.2x performance against its own server processors a few years ago, that's nice.