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MSI to Use Killer Network Adapters in Laptops, Motherboards

By - Source: MSI | B 18 comments

MSI to use Killer network adaptors in a select number of motherboards and gaming laptops.

MSI has joined companies such as Gigabyte and Alienware (Dell) in featuring Qualcomm Atheros' Killer network adapters on certain motherboards and gaming laptops to improve gaming experience and video streaming performance. The chip in question is the Killer E2200 which features a number of improvements over its predecessor, the E2100. For example, the E2200 has driver support for Windows 8 and Linux and MSI has worked with Qualcomm Atheros to create a software package that allows users to choose which data packets get priority.

We can expect the first Killer-powered MSI devices to be announced during CEBIT from March 5 to 9 in Germany.


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  • 3 Hide
    Firedrops , February 21, 2013 11:26 AM
    What a name, I thought it meant that the network adapters were of supermystical performance!
  • 0 Hide
    falchard , February 21, 2013 11:35 AM
    It means the Network Adapter is sophisticated enough to easily allow the user to determine network traffic priority. Still I like what MSI does.
  • 1 Hide
    mouse24 , February 21, 2013 11:42 AM
    falchardIt means the Network Adapter is sophisticated enough to easily allow the user to determine network traffic priority. Still I like what MSI does.


    No no I am quite certain that it injects network packets directly into the human brain to kill them.
    (in other news have you seen there commercials? They are hilarious. I require this to be linked in the article, its too good.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhm8QcAMdSc
  • 0 Hide
    ubercake , February 21, 2013 11:42 AM
    Do these things really make a difference?
  • 2 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 21, 2013 11:42 AM
    basically pointless chip. With a software, all the functionality of this chip can be done on the CPU itself, using barely 1-2% load. I wouldnt want this chip to suck uo=p battery.

    Still as a marketing gimmick, this is great.
  • 1 Hide
    Onus , February 21, 2013 12:02 PM
    I seem to recall an article some time back in which they were shown to make a statistically significant, but very small difference. My take was that if it adds more than a couple dollars to the price, it isn't worth it. I suspect an application like cFosSpeed can do at least as much; a version of this utility is bundled with many Asus and ASRock boards.
    I'd prefer MSI to work on quality. They need to improve their VRMs and/or cool them better, especially on lower-end boards.
  • 0 Hide
    bucknutty , February 21, 2013 12:15 PM
    I few years back I bought a Killer M1 PCI for around $20 bucks. At the time they were still going for around $200 new. The card worked great and I used it for about a year and tested it in every way I could imagine to see if it increased FPS in games, or if it decreased CPU load. It is no faster than the basic $10 generic nic with a broadcom chip.
    It was infact a good bit slower when doing transfers of large amounts of files. For example when I backed up my computer, I only backed up my important files and docs, so maybe 10-20 gigs but it was 1000s of files. That took for ever, twice as long as the onboard nic or the cheap pci nic.
  • 6 Hide
    TheBigTroll , February 21, 2013 12:26 PM
    id prefer a intel nic over this. better drivers
  • 0 Hide
    cats_Paw , February 21, 2013 12:53 PM
    MSI is always trying to improve... seems good to me.
  • 0 Hide
    mcoutu , February 21, 2013 1:01 PM
    I have a MSI GE60 / W8 with the E2200 in it. Have this laptop for a month and a half now. Works fine so far. is it faster than another NIC ? Can't say, I don't do benchmark for NICs.
  • 4 Hide
    jacobdrj , February 21, 2013 1:02 PM
    TheBigTrollid prefer a intel nic over this. better drivers

    This: I wish more mobo manufacturers would include bona fide Intel networking chipsets...
  • 0 Hide
    N.Broekhuijsen , February 21, 2013 1:58 PM
    mouse24No no I am quite certain that it injects network packets directly into the human brain to kill them.(in other news have you seen there commercials? They are hilarious. I require this to be linked in the article, its too good. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhm8QcAMdSc

    Drop me a message when you come across an ad for the E2200 and I might even write a piece on it ;) 
  • 1 Hide
    ddpruitt , February 21, 2013 3:14 PM
    TheBigTrollid prefer a intel nic over this. better drivers


    Provided you use Windows, otherwise you're screwed.
  • 2 Hide
    susyque747 , February 21, 2013 3:39 PM
    Thanks for the Linux support MSI.
  • 0 Hide
    jazz84 , February 21, 2013 4:00 PM
    Marketing gimmick, nothing more. I'd like to see how much extra the boards will cost now due to the inclusion of this "premium feature."
  • 0 Hide
    rantoc , February 21, 2013 4:03 PM
    You might end up gaining a ms or soo as well as a miniscule offload in cpu power, benefits... sure but their so darn small its only synthetic tests that can tell the difference as long as one app is working towards the internet. Placing 2 computers side by side and blind testing and peeps wont be able to tell the difference.
  • 0 Hide
    Soda-88 , February 21, 2013 7:27 PM
    It better not add a $50 extra to each boards price.
  • 0 Hide
    blazorthon , February 21, 2013 8:54 PM
    Killer WiFi adapters have proven (by Tom's, no less) to be much less of a marketing gimmick than the Ethernet Killer networking interfaces. Still, so long as these don't suck up much more power than regular NICs and don't increase costs, they shouldn't be a bad thing to have, right?