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Lenovo Releases 30-inch Professional AH-IPS Display

By - Source: HiTechReview | B 16 comments

Lenovo announced the release of its ThinkVision LT3053p professional monitor.

Lenovo has released a 30" monitor that is aimed at the business market and professionals: the ThinkVision LT3053p.

The Thinkvision LT3053p will pack an AH-IPS panel, which will deliver much better colors and viewing angles as compared to typical TN panels. The viewing angles are as such 178 degrees in all directions, and the panel should cover 99 percent of the Adobe RGB spectrum. The screen also has a resolution of 2560 by 1600 pixels, giving it an aspect ratio of 16:10. The contrast ratio is 1,000:1 static, 3,000,000:1 dynamic, and the brightness will go as high as 300 cd/m2.

Display inputs include HDMI, DVI-D, VGA and DisplayPort. The monitor also packs an integrated USB hub, which can drive up to five USB devices.

Included with the screen is a monitor hood which will reduce light reflection and improve perceived color consistency.

The Lenovo ThinkVision LT3053p will be available by the end of this month, and Lenovo will part with one and make you its owner for $1,600.

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  • -3 Hide
    samuelspark , April 6, 2013 6:02 PM
    That's expensive... Even for a QHD monitor.
  • 7 Hide
    joytech22 , April 6, 2013 6:29 PM
    Does it have built-in calibration sensors? No?
    Does it automatically calibrate colours to compensate for room variances? No?

    Then why does it cost so much again?
    The quality of the display itself is impressive, but not $1600 impressive.

    Bring on automated colour calibration and built-in sensors and maybe I'll meet them somewhere between $1500-$1700.
  • 9 Hide
    chicofehr , April 6, 2013 10:41 PM
    Dell and HP both got a 30" at around $1000 without the hood. I can use a cardboard box to make a hood and save $600. I got the Dell U3011 and don't see the need for the hood part. Waiting for the 4K monitors to come down to same price before I get one.
  • 0 Hide
    slomo4sho , April 7, 2013 2:51 AM
    Are the blinders really necessary?
  • 5 Hide
    patrick hamilton , April 7, 2013 5:16 AM
    They claim much better viewing angles, then tack on a hood.
  • -2 Hide
    Anonymous , April 7, 2013 8:36 AM
    When is someone going to make a LED 30 incher? That hood is hideous who would use that? Ive been using my HP 30 incher for 2 years now and never looked back at any less resolution. Once you have one of these you won't go back either.
  • 0 Hide
    chumly , April 7, 2013 11:12 AM
    Overpriced!
  • 3 Hide
    phyco126 , April 7, 2013 11:26 AM
    soldier2013When is someone going to make a LED 30 incher? That hood is hideous who would use that? Ive been using my HP 30 incher for 2 years now and never looked back at any less resolution. Once you have one of these you won't go back either.


    I'm really confused by your first question. This monitor is LED backlit. Graphic designers and video editors at my job use hoods, though they tend to make their own with cardboard.
  • 0 Hide
    kensingtron , April 7, 2013 3:19 PM
    phyco126I'm really confused by your first question. This monitor is LED backlit. Graphic designers and video editors at my job use hoods, though they tend to make their own with cardboard.


    He's talking about . Our designers turn all the lights off and shut the blinds.
  • 0 Hide
    kensingtron , April 7, 2013 3:20 PM
    true LED display

    http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-tvs/samsung-kn55f9500-real-oled/4505-6482_7-35561989.html
  • 1 Hide
    Blarg44 , April 7, 2013 3:25 PM
    patrick hamiltonThey claim much better viewing angles, then tack on a hood.

    I am 97% sure the hood will be removable. It is appeasing the professional by including it.
  • 1 Hide
    eklipz330 , April 7, 2013 9:03 PM
    the hood is to reduce external glare and other stimulus that would affect the image. probably a glass screen. clearly for professionals.
  • 0 Hide
    vaughn2k , April 7, 2013 10:10 PM
    The hood pretty much block the angle views... so much for that!
  • 1 Hide
    razor512 , April 8, 2013 12:38 AM
    Professional IPS panels are designed to be looked at directly from the front, while IPS has a wide view, the color quality begins to drop with even a slight change in angle.

    For that price, they need to include something to calibrate the display, along with a few light stands and lights for a proper color temperature lighting for the work environment.
  • 1 Hide
    Non-Euclidean , April 8, 2013 6:06 AM
    chicofehrDell and HP both got a 30" at around $1000 without the hood. I can use a cardboard box to make a hood and save $600. I got the Dell U3011 and don't see the need for the hood part. Waiting for the 4K monitors to come down to same price before I get one.


    Word. Then you can make a cardboard hood for your 4K!
  • 0 Hide
    CrArC , April 9, 2013 2:49 AM
    vaughn2kThe hood pretty much block the angle views... so much for that!


    I work in the LCD industry. That's not how this works. Viewing angles don't define an instant cutoff point at which monitors suddenly degrade in quality. Rather they define a point at which the display's performance has dropped below acceptable parameters (for example, a point at which the contrast ratio is no longer more than 20:1). That's a shockingly low number, right? The datasheet will define what these parameters are, but of course you end customers don't get to see those usually.

    If you have a 175+ degree display, try it. Try looking at it from that angle and telling me it looks even remotely like it does head-on. That number means nothing to you as a consumer. Just another number that sounds good, like dynamic contrast ratios.

    So we see the big performance difference at even angles within the quoted viewing angle range. This becomes a problem if the display is large, because it is so large that you can actually see a difference in performance across the surface of the monitor simply because the viewing angle of the edges of the monitor with respect to your eyes are so much different to the portion of the monitor directly in front of you.

    To prevent this, you need wide viewing angle panels, so the perceived performance doesn't drop between the middle and edges in normal use... But as we discussed, that results in ridiculous numbers because now the display reaches that threshold at a very wide angle. But that 178 degree number still doesn't actually mean a lot. So you end up with displays quoting wild 175+ angles because someone in marketing thought it sounded good, when in actuality at that angle the performance is terrible for real use and the display probably deteriorates visibly at 150 degrees or less.