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Sony Makes Peripheral That Adds 3D to Laptop Screen

By - Source: TechOn | B 30 comments

Sony is releasing an external lenticular screen "peripheral" that adds 3D to non-3D laptops.

During the IFA electronics show in Berlin last week, Sony revealed a 3-mm sheet that was placed over the front side of a standard notebook's screen, providing glasses-free 3D imagery. Additional dedicated software took advantage of the laptop's built-in webcam to determine the user's face and adjusted the 3D images accordingly.

According to reports, the 3D sheet/software bundle will be commercially released alongside the launch of Sony's 15.5-inch VAIO VPCSE1Z9E (S Series) laptop over in Europe next month. This could mean that there's a good chance consumers with other non-Sony 15.5-inch laptops will be able to convert to glasses-free 3D as well.

The 3D sheet reportedly measures just under 15.5-inches and is based on the lenticular method: a parallax is created by arraying lenses that are thin and long and have a semicircular cross section. In this case, the 3D images are created by the software based on the viewer's position. Faces can be detected at a distance of 11.8-inches to 39.3-inches from the display, and at an angle of 60 to 120° to the display horizontally.

So far there's no word when the display peripheral will arrive here in the States, or if Sony plans to develop additional sizes. However, the screen is expected to retail for 129 euro (approx $183 USD) when it goes on sale next month in Europe.

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  • 14 Hide
    icepick314 , September 7, 2011 12:04 AM
    lostmyclanMe too i want my eyes healtly...


    yall DO realize we live in 3D world....

    so far life hasn't gouged my eyeballs.....yet
  • 12 Hide
    HMRkingpin , September 6, 2011 11:47 PM
    That's pretty fu*king magnificent, If I do say. 3D for everyone!.
Other Comments
  • 12 Hide
    HMRkingpin , September 6, 2011 11:47 PM
    That's pretty fu*king magnificent, If I do say. 3D for everyone!.
  • -1 Hide
    fyasko , September 6, 2011 11:47 PM
    enough with the 3D. am i the only one who doesn't want anything to do with current 3D tech?
  • 6 Hide
    Pyree , September 6, 2011 11:48 PM
    Very very tempting.
  • 14 Hide
    icepick314 , September 7, 2011 12:04 AM
    lostmyclanMe too i want my eyes healtly...


    yall DO realize we live in 3D world....

    so far life hasn't gouged my eyeballs.....yet
  • 9 Hide
    jamie_1318 , September 7, 2011 12:28 AM
    contrary to most belief 3D doesn't really damage your eyes. Current research shows problems with developing children's brains in understanding 3D images. 3D content does not appear to affect anyone's vision above the age of 5.

    wouldn't you want 3D at all? I can't see it hurting anyone. You have extra data in the same space. It's fantastic (provided it's used right). Have you ever tried 3D gaming? It actually works Really Really well, and improves the immersion by quite a bit. I agree that they are pushing it to much in the theaters, and not in the right way, but it certainly is the future. I just wish that the glasses were standard.
  • -5 Hide
    Zenthar , September 7, 2011 12:40 AM
    The fact is 3D on a screen makes the eye focus on an object that is not really at the distance it is perceived to be. Whether or not this can damage your stereoscopic vision in adults is debatable; for many years people through that stereoscopic visions didn't change after 8-10 years of age, but recent studies tend to prove otherwise. I don't think watching something in 3D once in a while is unhealthy, but I would be careful not to go over 1-2 hours a day as it's usually the amount of time use to correct stereoscopic deficiencies so I guess it could do the opposite just as well.
  • -1 Hide
    palladin9479 , September 7, 2011 1:16 AM
    Seeing as I've been using 3D gaming since 2001 (NEC 17 Inch CRT 1024x768 @87hz) and I've yet to have eye issues, I'm fairly certain that there won't be any health risks. What's really happening is people's who are new to "3D" don't know what to do with it. Your trying to focus your eyeballs on something, STOP IT. Relax your eyes, don't try to focus on virtual objects, instead let the 3D engine do the focusing for you. Learn to focus at the screen and not at the visual tricks. It takes getting used to but once your comfortable doing this then it becomes so much more immersive. Games are awesome in 3D, and movies can be too, provided they don't try to go overboard and kill you with it. Thor is a really good movie to show how 3D could be done right, they used it heavily for the backgrounds of the Asguard and some of the special effects.

    Anyhow this seems to be really nice, you can add 3D support to any LCD device, although it'll be half resolution it's still nice.
  • 2 Hide
    Lekko , September 7, 2011 1:21 AM
    Nifty. Hopefully they make it for all screen sizes and systems, and also easily removable so you can take it off and put it back on multiple times.
  • 2 Hide
    the_krasno , September 7, 2011 3:23 AM
    This could also work very well with a desktop monitor, which is doubly awesome!! :D 
  • 3 Hide
    drwho1 , September 7, 2011 3:44 AM
    icepick314yall DO realize we live in 3D world....so far life hasn't gouged my eyeballs.....yet


    We actually live in 4D but who's counting...
  • 1 Hide
    fb39ca4 , September 7, 2011 4:02 AM
    Won't they have to make them specifically for each screen size and pixel pitch? Or am I missing something here?
  • -1 Hide
    buzznut , September 7, 2011 4:26 AM
    the_krasnoThis could also work very well with a desktop monitor, which is doubly awesome!!


    Yeah, but no way in hell I'm payin $183 for a piece of plastic to stick on my monitor.
  • 1 Hide
    CoffeeDrinker , September 7, 2011 6:51 AM
    jamie_1318contrary to most belief 3D doesn't really damage your eyes. Current research shows problems with developing children's brains in understanding 3D images. 3D content does not appear to affect anyone's vision above the age of 5. wouldn't you want 3D at all? I can't see it hurting anyone. You have extra data in the same space. It's fantastic (provided it's used right). Have you ever tried 3D gaming? It actually works Really Really well, and improves the immersion by quite a bit. I agree that they are pushing it to much in the theaters, and not in the right way, but it certainly is the future. I just wish that the glasses were standard.


    Actually, I do think that Sony is heading the right direction. however, you wish that Glasses were standard, i pressume you dont wear glasses everyday, so for the guys that do wear glasses, its a problem to wear 3D glasses, Glasses free 3D is great way to go for everyone.
  • 0 Hide
    alyoshka , September 7, 2011 6:56 AM
    That's really cool..... but I wonder if these sheets will work on all sorts of displays
  • 0 Hide
    cats_Paw , September 7, 2011 8:56 AM
    Definitly much more interesting than a stupid glasses non-working most times technology.we will see how it goes.
    As the last 7 years, im happy to "wait and see" when it comes to new technologies.
  • -1 Hide
    palladin9479 , September 7, 2011 9:08 AM
    Quote:
    Definitly much more interesting than a stupid glasses non-working most times technology.we will see how it goes.
    As the last 7 years, im happy to "wait and see" when it comes to new technologies.


    Huh ... non-working glass's?

    I've been doing stereoscopic 3D for 10 years now, and I've ~NEVER~ had stereoscopic glass's not work. LCD shutter glass's are simple, very little to break / screw up. Now polarization glass's really depend on the quality of the glass's and the matching screen / projection technique. It's the reason I only go to two theater's in my city, the rest use really poor glass's that aren't properly cleaned between use's.
  • 1 Hide
    DSpider , September 7, 2011 9:19 AM
    alyoshkaThat's really cool..... but I wonder if these sheets will work on all sorts of displays

    Well, you also need a webcam to track you (and adjust accordingly). So you'd have to be the only one watching. If someone else pops their head closer to the camera, the effect may be lost (although they probably could ignore the second face via software).

    But let's say it does come in various shapes and sizes to perfectly fit my screen size (and dot pitch). If they use one lens for 2 (or more) pixels that would effectively reduce the resolution possibly by more than half.

    Anyway. Almost $200 for a piece of plastic and some software. Um, I don't know...


    PS: And it's glasses, theatres not "theatre's". The apostrophe stands for "is". You're basically saying "theatre is" (just like "you're" stands for "you are").

    I'm not trying to be mean or anything but when I see "glass's" I rage a bit, on the inside.
  • 6 Hide
    back_by_demand , September 7, 2011 12:20 PM
    drwho1We actually live in 4D but who's counting...

    We actually live in an 11D world but most of the higher dimensions are not percievable unless you are a minor god or a Gallifreyan Timelord, but who's counting...
  • 1 Hide
    back_by_demand , September 7, 2011 12:21 PM
    BTW, although good for personal use, this is not much good for scaling upwards to a TV as there could be more than 1 person viewing it
  • 1 Hide
    bystander , September 7, 2011 2:42 PM
    All these comments on 3D hurting eyes clearly is a result of people not having used the technology. The glasses free versions could be different, but the shutter glasses method has no adverse effect in terms of stereoscopic 3D. It simply causes you to focus on objects the same way you would if it was at the distance it's supposed to be. The only adverse effect is that it blacks out one eye at a time at a rate of 60hz. It's the blacking out part that may give issues, not the stereoscopic 3D itself.

    The blacking of one eye at a time, is quite similar to the flickering caused by CRT monitors. While a low refresh rate did cause headaches, I have never heard of CRT's damaging your eyes as a result.
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