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Intel P67 Express Chipset Begins Product Discontinuance Cycle

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 25 comments

On April 2nd, Intel quietly announced its P67 Express chipset has been discontinued just ahead of Ivy Bridge's release.

With the market demand going more towards Z68 motherboards and now with the release of the new Intel 7 Series Z77 (coming soon: Z75, H77 and B75) chipsets, Intel has announced the product discontinuance of the P67 chipset. The P67 will not necessarily go quietly into the night, though. The chipset that has powered the current generation Sandy Bridge processors since the start, will be compatible with Intel's new Ivy Bridge processors through an appropriate UEFI update. The chipset will be available through April 5, 2013.

Forecasted Key Milestones:

  • Product Discontinuance Program Support Began: Apr 02, 2012
  • Product Discontinuance Demand to Local Intel Representative: Jul 06, 2012
  • Finalize Discontinuance Assurance: Aug 10, 2012
  • Last Corporate Assurance Product Critical Date: Oct 18, 2012
  • Last Product Order Date: Oct 26, 2012
  • Orders are Non-Cancelable and Non-Returnable After: Oct 26, 2012
  • Last Shipment Date: Apr 05, 2013

   

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  • 13 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , April 10, 2012 3:11 PM
    No probs! P67 kicked some ass and that means that if my board will ever die on me, I'll get a shiny new Z68/Z77 on warranty claim because P67 is "no stock" like they say in the local store :p 
  • 10 Hide
    rubix_1011 , April 10, 2012 4:03 PM
    I think people need to understand that by moving forward to bigger and better things, you must leave the older, unused feature sets behind. There is a reason that NEW features and functionality are developed and that old ones disappear. We are just now seeing floppy disks disappear after how long? I don't understand this desire to hang on to outdated hardware and the specs that powered them.
Other Comments
  • 8 Hide
    Murissokah , April 10, 2012 2:21 PM
    Thanks god we still have Intel's backward compatibility. Wait...
  • 4 Hide
    alvine , April 10, 2012 2:39 PM
    ^ I see what you did there har har
  • 13 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , April 10, 2012 3:11 PM
    No probs! P67 kicked some ass and that means that if my board will ever die on me, I'll get a shiny new Z68/Z77 on warranty claim because P67 is "no stock" like they say in the local store :p 
  • 6 Hide
    SuperVeloce , April 10, 2012 3:58 PM
    MurissokahThanks god we still have Intel's backward compatibility. Wait...

    Tell me... how do you expect to drive a processor with memory controler, pci-e, voltage regulators and all that stuff integrated on chip with an old P45 motherboard? Do you want FSB back? DO YOU?
    Ivy will be backward compatible with Sandy motherboards with a simple BIOS update, if your motherboard maker is kind enough to support it.

    It's nothing unusual, if you need to upgrade your bios on older motherboards with pci-e 1.1 or 2.0 to support 2.1 graphics cards... so why is making an update on arhitecture any worse?
  • 10 Hide
    rubix_1011 , April 10, 2012 4:03 PM
    I think people need to understand that by moving forward to bigger and better things, you must leave the older, unused feature sets behind. There is a reason that NEW features and functionality are developed and that old ones disappear. We are just now seeing floppy disks disappear after how long? I don't understand this desire to hang on to outdated hardware and the specs that powered them.
  • 4 Hide
    officeguy , April 10, 2012 4:07 PM
    What is a floppy disk?
  • 3 Hide
    eddieroolz , April 10, 2012 4:22 PM
    A shaky start but it ended its life rather solidly, I must say.
  • -4 Hide
    ctbaars , April 10, 2012 5:08 PM
    ^All that said. I still need a fully functional Parallel port, two serial ports and a Floopy, I mean Floppy for work.
  • 0 Hide
    SuperVeloce , April 10, 2012 5:35 PM
    You can get parallel, serial and IDE connectors on pci-e boards. one example
  • -3 Hide
    jurassic512 , April 10, 2012 5:47 PM
    MurissokahThanks god we still have Intel's backward compatibility. Wait...


    Unlike AMD, Intel makes drastic changes to their CPU's every year to warrant a new socket and chipset.
  • 7 Hide
    fomoz , April 10, 2012 6:41 PM
    officeguyWhat is a floppy disk?

    It's like a 1.44 MB USB stick.
  • 0 Hide
    Murissokah , April 10, 2012 6:45 PM
    jurassic512Unlike AMD, Intel makes drastic changes to their CPU's every year to warrant a new socket and chipset.That was


    That was my point.
  • 1 Hide
    samwelaye , April 10, 2012 7:17 PM
    jurassic512Unlike AMD, Intel makes drastic changes to their CPU's every year to warrant a new socket and chipset.


    Unlike AMD, Intel also makes changes to their CPU architecture that actually ADD to performance. If that is the trade-off with breaking compatibility, so be it.
  • 0 Hide
    LuckyDucky7 , April 10, 2012 7:43 PM
    Quote:

    Unlike AMD, Intel also makes changes to their CPU architecture that actually ADD to performance. If that is the trade-off with breaking compatibility, so be it.


    Except we already know that that's essentially BS. Remember ASRock's P67 Transformer?
    That was a motherboard that, while based on the P67 chipset, powered the first-generation Core i3 processors (LGA 1156, native to the 5-series chipset).

    So we can see that there weren't "drastic changes" made. In fact, there was a certain decision made (where the clock generator was located) to intentionally break compatibility- something that could (and probably should) have continued on.
  • 1 Hide
    atminside , April 10, 2012 8:01 PM
    so many god damned socket revisions. I would be a loyal intel consumer if they would just try to be consistent in keeping the same socket configuration. This is the only reason I am with AMD even though intel offers a more powerful line up of cpus. I can't just keep dishing out hundreds for a new mobo just so i can use a new processor with slightly more features than the previous generation.
  • 3 Hide
    SteelCity1981 , April 10, 2012 8:57 PM
    For years intel didn't change the socket platform of the LGA 775 that ranged fomr the Pentium 4 era to the Core 2 Quad era and the performance jump leaps and bounds. Intel could have kept the same LGA 1155 socket until Haswell if they wanted to, but didn't. there was no drastic arch changes that prompted for a new socket between the first and second Core i generations. compared to the Pentuim 4 and Core 2 Duo generations where there were drastic changes in the arch but Intel kept the same LGA 775 platform all those years. So no there isn't an actual need to change sockets every other year other then for marketing reasons.
  • 0 Hide
    SuperVeloce , April 10, 2012 9:15 PM
    yeah, and Pentium 4 communication with memory, pci-e, ... is no different from core 2 duo/quad. Internal arhitecture was different, but not in a manner of communication with other computer components. you forgot to mention the difference in northbridges from different chipsets. you had 8xx and 915 only for P4. 945 and 965 was backward compatible with P4. P35 ended support for P4. So no, you had 775, but it did not support every arhitecture through all of its life.
  • -1 Hide
    A Bad Day , April 10, 2012 9:22 PM
    rubix_1011I think people need to understand that by moving forward to bigger and better things, you must leave the older, unused feature sets behind. There is a reason that NEW features and functionality are developed and that old ones disappear. We are just now seeing floppy disks disappear after how long? I don't understand this desire to hang on to outdated hardware and the specs that powered them.


    On the flip side, compatibility can't be thrown out completely. Why is PCI-E so successful? Because PCI-E 2.0 is compatible with 1.0 or 3.0. If every version was completely different, the market adoption would've been much slower.

    Unless if you're the only one who's making the stuff that uses it (CPU and CPU socket). However, I would find it unreasonable if Intel got extremely greedy and tied each small groups of or individual processors to a specific chipset or sockets, even if they had the same steppings.
  • 0 Hide
    aaronstyle , April 10, 2012 11:53 PM

    fomozIt's like a 1.44 MB USB stick.

    A 1.44 MB USB stick the size of a small plate. (FTFY)
  • 0 Hide
    tomfreak , April 11, 2012 2:53 AM
    amk-aka-phantomNo probs! P67 kicked some ass and that means that if my board will ever die on me, I'll get a shiny new Z68/Z77 on warranty claim because P67 is "no stock" like they say in the local store
    oh yeah i got 4yrs and 3months left on my sabertooth warranty. Guess if I mange to break it b4 that I get a free z77 sabertooth upgrade.
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