Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Sony Locks 93,000 Accounts After Hacking Attempt

By - Source: Sony | B 20 comments

Déjà vu?

Sony has locked the PSN and SOE accounts of 93,000 users following a hacking attempt that saw hackers try to test a 'massive set of log-in IDs and passwords.' The company revealed the attempted breach in a blog post published last night. Philip Reitinger, SVP & Chief Information Security Officer at Sony Group, said that the data likely came from another source, and not from Sony's own networks.

"These attempts appear to include a large amount of data obtained from one or more compromised lists from other companies, sites or other sources," he said. "In this case, given that the data tested against our network consisted of sign-in ID-password pairs, and that the overwhelming majority of the pairs resulted in failed matching attempts, it is likely the data came from another source and not from our Networks. We have taken steps to mitigate the activity."

However, the hackers weren't totally unsuccessful. Reitinger said that there were roughly 93,000 accounts (60K on PSN/SEN and 33K on SOE) where the attackers succeeded in verifying valid sign-in IDs and passwords. Sony has locked those accounts and is reviewing them for unauthorized access. The company assured affected users that credit card numbers associated with their accounts are not at risk. He also explained that users will need to change their passwords.

"As a preventative measure, we are requiring secure password resets for those PSN/SEN accounts that had both a sign-in ID and password match through this attempt," Retinger said. "If you are in the small group of PSN/SEN users who may have been affected, you will receive an email from us at the address associated with your account that will prompt you to reset your password."

Affected SOE account holders will receive an email advising them on steps to take that will validate their account and switch it back on.

Read the full post from Sony here.

Display 20 Comments.
This thread is closed for comments
Top Comments
  • 21 Hide
    garyshome , October 12, 2011 6:10 PM
    Well here we go again.
  • 19 Hide
    mobrocket , October 12, 2011 6:09 PM
    "The company assured affected users that credit card numbers associated with their accounts are not at risk"

    because those were already stolen from the last time
  • 16 Hide
    The Greater Good , October 12, 2011 6:13 PM
    Every time I read a story like this, I'm more thankful that I game on the PC.
Other Comments
  • 14 Hide
    HansVonOhain , October 12, 2011 6:07 PM
    Unfortunate for Sony as they are getting a lot of attention while they are trying to fix their quirks
  • 19 Hide
    mobrocket , October 12, 2011 6:09 PM
    "The company assured affected users that credit card numbers associated with their accounts are not at risk"

    because those were already stolen from the last time
  • 21 Hide
    garyshome , October 12, 2011 6:10 PM
    Well here we go again.
  • 16 Hide
    The Greater Good , October 12, 2011 6:13 PM
    Every time I read a story like this, I'm more thankful that I game on the PC.
  • 15 Hide
    LongLiveRock1974 , October 12, 2011 6:29 PM
    I game 99% on PC and 1% on PS3. That 1% is really biting me in the ass.
  • 6 Hide
    COLGeek , October 12, 2011 6:36 PM
    While these stories get lots of attention on forum sites like Tom's, this sort of thing happens everyday, around the world, at countless businesses, banks, agencies, schools, etc and doesn't make headlines.

    This is an unfortunate side-effect of a "connected" world. Just trying to keep things in perspective.
  • 4 Hide
    dola74 , October 12, 2011 6:40 PM
    My ps3 is my blu ray player and that's about it. My xbox sits and collects dust because it's ancient tech. I game 100% PC 8)it just looks better and plays better.
  • 2 Hide
    nemo888 , October 12, 2011 6:50 PM
    I did not like receiving an email that my Sony Online account had been buying stuff. At least they didn't use my credit card as the one I used for Sony was expired.
  • 4 Hide
    AbdullahG , October 12, 2011 8:05 PM
    Console gamers complain about the price for gaming PCs. We get what we pay for, and much more. You guys get this :p 
  • -1 Hide
    soundping , October 12, 2011 8:13 PM
    Need more biometric security.
  • 6 Hide
    stingstang , October 12, 2011 8:31 PM
    Haha! Remember the last time they said all the credit cards weren't on jeopardy?
  • 1 Hide
    jsheridan , October 12, 2011 9:18 PM
    you guys did read the article right? I mean it says that 33k of the accounts were from SOE.....so that is console only? I think this affects both console and PC gamers. The accounts probably belong to the people that gave up on Sony after the last attack and never logged back in to change their passwords. Hopefully it will all be cleaned up soon.
  • 9 Hide
    hetneo , October 12, 2011 9:47 PM
    I see 93,000 idiots who didn't bother to change their passwords after previous PSN blackout.
  • 0 Hide
    mrecio , October 12, 2011 10:31 PM
    "These attempts appear to include a large amount of data obtained from one or more compromised lists from other companies, sites or other sources," he said. "In this case, given that the data tested against our network consisted of sign-in ID-password pairs"

    Why do other companies have databases with login ID's and Passwords to begin with? that in itself is very insecure, does Sony actually give this database out to other companies? If so to what purpose? I would much rather think that these are list stolen during the last break and are being tested, too bad 93K people are too stupid to actually change their password after knowingly being hacked.
  • 0 Hide
    Novulux , October 12, 2011 10:31 PM
    hetneoI see 93,000 idiots who didn't bother to change their passwords after previous PSN blackout.


    I didn't. Not because I am an idiot, but because I had never logged back on (no sensitive info)
  • 4 Hide
    spectrewind , October 12, 2011 10:48 PM
    Having seen this coming before it actually happened as it did, those PSN $20/$50 cards you can buy at just about any grocery store seem to be then answer.
    Load your money into one of those and validate the number against the website. When you do buy something, no credit card needed.

    There's probably a more ingenious way to do it, but that seems to work for me, and ensures security by not inserting my credit card info to the PSN service/website.
  • 2 Hide
    izmanq , October 13, 2011 1:32 AM
    soundpingNeed more biometric security.

    i don't think biometric will help much :D  if they can get users biometric data, it's just like users password, and the bad news is, you can't change your biometrics :D 
  • 0 Hide
    psychotek71 , October 13, 2011 4:21 AM
    i just got hit with with credit card fraud
    someone stole my info from the psn ..
    now what sony ... im so gonna sue
  • 1 Hide
    eddieroolz , October 13, 2011 4:44 AM
    At least Sony seems a lot more prepared now to deal with these sorts of attacks. Make no mistake; cyber attacks will not end.
  • 0 Hide
    velocityg4 , October 13, 2011 4:45 PM
    "If you are in the small group of PSN/SEN users who may have been affected, you will receive an email from us at the address associated with your account that will prompt you to reset your password."

    How many of these people will actually pay attention to the e-mail and not just delete it immediately as spam. As we have been trained to do with all the scam e-mail claiming to be Paypal, eBay, Bank of America, &c. Which then ask to click a link to verify information among other things to get passwords, usernames, personal identification, &c.