Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Be Quiet!, Fractal Design & Thermaltake Release List of Haswell Compatible PSUs

By - Source: TechPowerUp | B 21 comments

Fractal Design, Thermaltake, and Be Quiet! all release their list of Haswell compatible power supplies.

Earlier, we heard that Intel's Haswell CPUs might have problems with certain less expensive or older power supplies, because the Haswell CPUs would be too efficient for them. A number of manufacturers have already released their lists with compatible power supplies, and now three manufacturers join in: Fractal Design, Thermaltake and Be Quiet!.

First, Be Quiet! has announced that all of its current power supplies are compatible with the Haswell CPUs. This includes all the models that are currently in production and for sale, but not older units, which might still be on shelves, but are not necessarily compatible. Some older units are mostly compatible, it mentions. The model series that are definitely compatible are: the Dark Power Pro 10, Straight Power E9, Pure Power L8, System Power 7, and Pure Power L7 series (630 W and 730 W).

Moving on, Thermaltake has announced that the Toughpower Platinum (700 W and 600 W), Toughpower Gold (1200 W, 1050 W, 850 W, 750 W, 650 W), Toughpower XT (1475 W, 1375 W, 1275 W), Toughpower (1500 W, 1200 W, 1000 W, 850 W, 750 W), EVO_BLUE 2.0 (850 W, 750 W, 650 W), and SMART M (850 W, 750 W) are all 100 percent compatible with the upcoming Intel Haswell CPUs.

Lastly, Fractal Design has also released a list of Haswell compatible power supplies. The power supplies that it has mentioned as compatible include the Newton R3 (1000 W, 1000 W White, 800 W, 600 W) and the Tesla R2 (1000 W, 800 W, 650 W, 650 W White, 500 W). The Integra R2 lineup (750 W, 650 W, 500 W) have been rated as likely compatible, although the compatibility is questioned since Intel hasn't released any formal testing procedure or minimum qualifications.

Discuss
Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the News comments forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

This thread is closed for comments
  • -1 Hide
    dietrich1 , May 21, 2013 6:11 PM
    haswell's too good for my psu? then i'm too good for haswell. i'm sticking with pentium.
  • 0 Hide
    afrobacon , May 21, 2013 6:11 PM
    Would be nice if SeaSonic released something similar.
  • 0 Hide
    unknown9122 , May 21, 2013 6:30 PM
    Yeah Seasonic only has 1 compatible PSU (if I remember correctly) according to Intel.
  • Display all 21 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    Cons29 , May 21, 2013 6:40 PM
    seasonic already said that their psu lineup is compatible with haswell.
    i've seen their statement like at least 2 weeks ago. can't remember where though
  • 0 Hide
    Cons29 , May 21, 2013 6:42 PM
    here you go, from Toms as well
    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Seasonic-Haswell-Power-Supply,22544.html
  • -1 Hide
    JonnyDough , May 21, 2013 8:48 PM
    Intel hasn't released any formal testing procedure or minimum qualifications.
    So just what is "Haswell compatible"?
    Seems like marketing fluff to me. Won't a regular 24 pin PSU with the latest standards work fine?
  • 2 Hide
    JonnyDough , May 21, 2013 8:49 PM
    Intel hasn't released any formal testing procedure or minimum qualifications.
    So just what is "Haswell compatible"?
    Seems like marketing fluff to me. Won't a regular 24 pin PSU with the latest standards work fine?
  • 0 Hide
    cobra5000 , May 21, 2013 10:19 PM
    Looks like bs, to me.
  • 0 Hide
    JonnyDough , May 21, 2013 10:35 PM
    Intel hasn't released any formal testing procedure or minimum qualifications.
    So just what is "Haswell compatible"?
    Seems like marketing fluff to me. Won't a regular 24 pin PSU with the latest standards work fine?
  • 0 Hide
    -Jackson , May 21, 2013 10:49 PM
    Umm, what?
    What is it new exactly about Haswell that requires "compatible" PSUs?
    Edit: Never mind, just read the power states article.
  • 0 Hide
    dimar , May 21, 2013 10:55 PM
    Haswell requires the power supply to handle very low power states.
  • 0 Hide
    WINTERLORD , May 21, 2013 11:07 PM
    any idea if a real power pro from coolemaster 650watt would handle hasweel? what wou;ld happen if your psu did'nbt handle/like haswell burn your stuff?
  • 0 Hide
    invisibilian , May 22, 2013 2:13 AM
    I would be really angry, if they told me that my new corsair TX 750W PSU was not longer compatible with the latest chips from intel.
  • 0 Hide
    VirtualMark , May 22, 2013 6:20 AM
    BeQuiet are junk - my top of the line PSU failed after only a few weeks. It put out a high pitched whine. Absolute rubbish, I've never had one fail, let alone in a few days.
  • 0 Hide
    DJChangsta , May 22, 2013 6:46 AM
    Quote:
    Intel hasn't released any formal testing procedure or minimum qualifications.
    So just what is "Haswell compatible"?
    Seems like marketing fluff to me. Won't a regular 24 pin PSU with the latest standards work fine?

    There was concern for power supplies supporting the sleep modes for Haswell.

    "The new C6/C7 power states on the Haswell-Shark Bay platform will require the system power supply to be able to maintain a minimum current load of 0.05Amps on the CPU exclusive 12V2 rail (0.6W)."

    Source
  • 0 Hide
    mrjhh , May 22, 2013 6:48 AM
    Quote:
    Intel hasn't released any formal testing procedure or minimum qualifications.
    So just what is "Haswell compatible"?
    Seems like marketing fluff to me. Won't a regular 24 pin PSU with the latest standards work fine?


    I ran into a similar problem a few years ago when I got one of the first Intel processors with an integrated GPU. Without the load of a separate GPU, the PSU wouldn't even stay on for more than a few seconds until I connected an old disk to the power supply, just to add more power usage.
  • 0 Hide
    mmculber , May 22, 2013 10:23 AM
    From what I have read it looks like Haswell will support a couple new low power states (see link below) that not all power supplies will support. I'm not sure, however, if that means that your old PS won't work at all or will works but just won't be able to support the features enabled by the C6/C7 low power states. My guess would be the latter. I am hoping that someone can better clarify.
    Hopefully the link below helps. Thanks.
    http://techreport.com/news/24738/few-psus-support-haswell-c6-c7-low-power-states
  • 0 Hide
    DJChangsta , May 22, 2013 10:46 AM
    Quote:
    From what I have read it looks like Haswell will support a couple new low power states (see link below) that not all power supplies will support. I'm not sure, however, if that means that your old PS won't work at all or will works but just won't be able to support the features enabled by the C6/C7 low power states. My guess would be the latter. I am hoping that someone can better clarify.
    Hopefully the link below helps. Thanks.
    http://techreport.com/news/24738/few-psus-support-haswell-c6-c7-low-power-states


    This is the best answer I could find.

    "According to Intel's presentation at IDF, the new Haswell processors enter a sleep state called C7 that can drop processor power usage as low as 0.05A. Even if the sleeping CPU is the only load on the +12V rail, most power supplies can handle a load this low. The potential problem comes up when there is still a substantial load on the power supply's non-primary rails (the +3.3V and +5V). If the load on these non-primary rails are above a certain threshold (which varies by PSU), the +12V can go out of spec (voltages greater than +12.6V). If the +12V is out of spec when the motherboard comes out of the sleep state, the PSU's protection may prevent the PSU from running and will cause the power supply to "latch off". This will require the user to cycle the power on their power supply using the power switch on the back of the unit."

    Source
  • 1 Hide
    mmculber , May 22, 2013 2:23 PM
    This is the best answer I could find.

    "According to Intel's presentation at IDF, the new Haswell processors enter a sleep state called C7 that can drop processor power usage as low as 0.05A. Even if the sleeping CPU is the only load on the +12V rail, most power supplies can handle a load this low. The potential problem comes up when there is still a substantial load on the power supply's non-primary rails (the +3.3V and +5V). If the load on these non-primary rails are above a certain threshold (which varies by PSU), the +12V can go out of spec (voltages greater than +12.6V). If the +12V is out of spec when the motherboard comes out of the sleep state, the PSU's protection may prevent the PSU from running and will cause the power supply to "latch off". This will require the user to cycle the power on their power supply using the power switch on the back of the unit."

    Source[/quotemsg]

    Thanks DJChangsta!
  • 0 Hide
    zodiacfml , May 22, 2013 6:41 PM
    bs,indeed. this is not news.
Display more comments